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Fretwork - In Nomine II

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In Nomine II

Fretwork

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The very select viola consort Fretwork made its name in 1987 with the release of In Nomine, a début album dedicated to the English Renaissance, which contained the complete works of Thomas Tallis, written for this very noble instrumental family. This first record from the English musicians seduced composer George Benjamin to the point that it inspired his composition Upon Silence, which brought back an instrumental genre which had not been seen since the end of the Renaissance. The composer and his performers went on to open the way for the revival of sounds which were popular in the 16th Century before the creation of the violin family by the great luthiers of Italy. Michael Nyman, Sir John Taverner and many others all in turn enriched the repertoire of the Fretwork ensemble, which would become, almost despite itself, a pioneering force for contemporary music, with almost 40 works having been written for it. More than 30 years on, here is In Nomine II, held up like a mirror to the trajectories of the Fretwork artists. Continuing on from their 1987 "opus primus", here they are exploring three centuries of music: the 16th, the base of their work; our 21st Century with two minimalist composers, one the American Nico Muhly, the other the Englishman Gavin Bryars; and on the way, the 17th Century, with a homage to the great Purcell, a father of English music. In an irony of history, while the violin supplanted the viola to the point of relegating the latter to the museum, the older instrument still has something to say, and today it is taking a fine revenge. © François Hudry/Qobuz

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In Nomine II

Fretwork

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1
Slow (In Nomine in 5 Parts) 00:08:18

Nico Muhly, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Chester Music, MusicPublisher - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

2
In Nomine IV in 7 Parts 00:02:29

Fretwork, MainArtist - Robert Parsons, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

3
In Nomine V in 7 parts 00:03:03

Fretwork, MainArtist - Robert Parsons, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

4
In Nomine in 11/4 00:05:37

John Bull, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

5
Proportions to the Minim 00:02:31

John Baldwin, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

6
Upon In Nomine 1592 00:01:36

John Baldwin, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

7
In Nomine 1606 00:02:19

John Baldwin, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

8
In Nomine in 6 Parts, No. 1 00:03:45

Fretwork, MainArtist - Alfonso Ferrabosco II, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

9
In Nomine in 6 Parts, No. 2 00:04:07

Fretwork, MainArtist - Alfonso Ferrabosco II, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

10
In Nomine Through All the Parts 00:05:47

Fretwork, MainArtist - Alfonso Ferrabosco II, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

11
In Nomine 00:09:16

Fretwork, MainArtist - Gavin Bryars, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer - SCHOTT MUSIC, MusicPublisher

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

12
In Nomine in 5 Parts 00:03:19

Fretwork, MainArtist - John Ward, Composer - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

13
Reporte 00:01:46

Christopher Tye, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

14
Howlde Fast 00:01:09

Christopher Tye, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

15
Re La Re 00:01:22

Christopher Tye, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

16
In Nomine in 7 Parts, Z. 747 00:03:39

Henry Purcell, Composer - Fretwork, MainArtist - Adrian Hunter, Producer

(C) 2019 Signum Records (P) 2019 Signum Records

Album Description

The very select viola consort Fretwork made its name in 1987 with the release of In Nomine, a début album dedicated to the English Renaissance, which contained the complete works of Thomas Tallis, written for this very noble instrumental family. This first record from the English musicians seduced composer George Benjamin to the point that it inspired his composition Upon Silence, which brought back an instrumental genre which had not been seen since the end of the Renaissance. The composer and his performers went on to open the way for the revival of sounds which were popular in the 16th Century before the creation of the violin family by the great luthiers of Italy. Michael Nyman, Sir John Taverner and many others all in turn enriched the repertoire of the Fretwork ensemble, which would become, almost despite itself, a pioneering force for contemporary music, with almost 40 works having been written for it. More than 30 years on, here is In Nomine II, held up like a mirror to the trajectories of the Fretwork artists. Continuing on from their 1987 "opus primus", here they are exploring three centuries of music: the 16th, the base of their work; our 21st Century with two minimalist composers, one the American Nico Muhly, the other the Englishman Gavin Bryars; and on the way, the 17th Century, with a homage to the great Purcell, a father of English music. In an irony of history, while the violin supplanted the viola to the point of relegating the latter to the museum, the older instrument still has something to say, and today it is taking a fine revenge. © François Hudry/Qobuz

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