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John Patitucci|Imprint

Imprint

John Patitucci

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When GRP dropped John Patitucci in 1996, it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. The bassist found a supportive new home in Concord Jazz, where his creativity was encouraged and he was able to take his share of chances. Just as 1998's cerebral Now was a departure from 1996's introspective, deeply personal One More Angel, Imprint finds Patitucci surprising his followers once again by emphasizing Latin elements. Employing drummer Jack DeJohnette and saxman Chris Potter, as well as Latino improvisers, pianist Danilo Perez and drummer/percussionist Horacio "El Negro" Hernandez, Imprint is the most Latin-minded album that he recorded in the 1990s. However, Imprint isn't Latin jazz in the sense that Poncho Sanchez is Latin jazz -- it is more intellectual and less direct, and it's not as accessible. While Sanchez's releases tend to favor immediacy and take an extroverted, party-time approach, that's hardly what Patitucci is going for on this acoustic post-post-jazz effort. Sticking to the upright bass, Patitucci delivers an album that is almost as intellectual as Now, but with an emphasis on Latin rhythms. For those who aren't afraid of being challenged, Imprint is a welcome addition to the bassist's catalogue.
© Alex Henderson /TiVo

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Imprint

John Patitucci

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1
King Kong
00:08:38

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

2
Postcard
00:06:45

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

3
Little Steps
00:07:11

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

4
Joan
00:06:45

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

5
Maroon Bells
00:00:41

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - Sachi Patitucci, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

6
Imprint
00:11:21

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

7
The Well
00:05:51

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

8
Essay
00:09:03

John Patitucci, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

9
Japanese Folk Song
00:05:23

Traditional, ComposerLyricist - John Patitucci, MainArtist

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

10
Afro Blue
00:05:36

John Patitucci, MainArtist - Mongo Santamaria, Composer

℗ 2000 Concord Records, Inc.

Album Description

When GRP dropped John Patitucci in 1996, it turned out to be a blessing in disguise. The bassist found a supportive new home in Concord Jazz, where his creativity was encouraged and he was able to take his share of chances. Just as 1998's cerebral Now was a departure from 1996's introspective, deeply personal One More Angel, Imprint finds Patitucci surprising his followers once again by emphasizing Latin elements. Employing drummer Jack DeJohnette and saxman Chris Potter, as well as Latino improvisers, pianist Danilo Perez and drummer/percussionist Horacio "El Negro" Hernandez, Imprint is the most Latin-minded album that he recorded in the 1990s. However, Imprint isn't Latin jazz in the sense that Poncho Sanchez is Latin jazz -- it is more intellectual and less direct, and it's not as accessible. While Sanchez's releases tend to favor immediacy and take an extroverted, party-time approach, that's hardly what Patitucci is going for on this acoustic post-post-jazz effort. Sticking to the upright bass, Patitucci delivers an album that is almost as intellectual as Now, but with an emphasis on Latin rhythms. For those who aren't afraid of being challenged, Imprint is a welcome addition to the bassist's catalogue.
© Alex Henderson /TiVo

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