Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Anton Bruckner - Bruckner: Symphony No. 9, Live at the Salzburg Festival

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

Bruckner: Symphony No. 9, Live at the Salzburg Festival

Philharmonia Orchestra

Digital booklet

Available in
logo Hi-Res
24-Bit 48.0 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Christoph von Dohnányi and the Philharmonia Orchestra recorded Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 9 in D minor at the Salzburg Festival in 2014, offering a powerful live rendition that is also controlled and clear. This work often suffers in performance from murky textures and excessive heaviness in the bass parts, but Dohnányi balances the sections so the orchestration is lighter, and he pays close attention to details in the inner parts, making the music seem almost transparent in places. Also, he takes tempos a bit faster than might be expected and builds momentum to alleviate the ponderous weight of the first movement. Pacing is critical to keep the symphony from stalling out in the Scherzo and utterly falling apart in the Adagio, which often happens in less concentrated performances, so Dohnányi keeps the orchestra moving forward, sometimes even accelerating it to avoid an overly reverent feeling and to give purpose to Bruckner's repetitive rhythms. This is a first-rate performance of the three-movement version, and even though Dohnányi didn't take a chance with one of the completed finales that are gradually finding a place in the repertoire, it is still a worthwhile interpretation that bears repeated listening.
© TiVo

More info

Bruckner: Symphony No. 9, Live at the Salzburg Festival

Anton Bruckner

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

Copy the following link to share it

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 70 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this album and more than 70 million songs with your unlimited streaming plans.

1
Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, WAB 109: I. Feierlich, misterioso
Philharmonia Orchestra
00:24:50

Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Anton BRUCKNER, Composer - Christoph von Dohnanyi, Conductor

(C) 2015 Signum Records (P) 2015 Philharmonia Orchestra

2
Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, WAB 109: II. Scherzo: Bewegt, lebhaft – Trio: Schnell – Scherzo
Philharmonia Orchestra
00:10:51

Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Anton BRUCKNER, Composer - Christoph von Dohnanyi, Conductor

(C) 2015 Signum Records (P) 2015 Philharmonia Orchestra

3
Symphony No. 9 in D Minor, WAB 109: III. Adagio: Langsam, feierlich
Christoph von Dohnányi
00:25:41

Philharmonia Orchestra, Orchestra, MainArtist - Anton BRUCKNER, Composer - Christoph von Dohnanyi, Conductor

(C) 2015 Signum Records (P) 2015 Philharmonia Orchestra

Album Description

Christoph von Dohnányi and the Philharmonia Orchestra recorded Anton Bruckner's Symphony No. 9 in D minor at the Salzburg Festival in 2014, offering a powerful live rendition that is also controlled and clear. This work often suffers in performance from murky textures and excessive heaviness in the bass parts, but Dohnányi balances the sections so the orchestration is lighter, and he pays close attention to details in the inner parts, making the music seem almost transparent in places. Also, he takes tempos a bit faster than might be expected and builds momentum to alleviate the ponderous weight of the first movement. Pacing is critical to keep the symphony from stalling out in the Scherzo and utterly falling apart in the Adagio, which often happens in less concentrated performances, so Dohnányi keeps the orchestra moving forward, sometimes even accelerating it to avoid an overly reverent feeling and to give purpose to Bruckner's repetitive rhythms. This is a first-rate performance of the three-movement version, and even though Dohnányi didn't take a chance with one of the completed finales that are gradually finding a place in the repertoire, it is still a worthwhile interpretation that bears repeated listening.
© TiVo

About the album

Distinctions:

Improve this page

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

On sale now...

Aqualung

Jethro Tull

Aqualung Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick

Jethro Tull

Thick as a Brick Jethro Tull

Source

Nubya Garcia

Source Nubya Garcia

Misplaced Childhood

Marillion

More on Qobuz
By Anton Bruckner

Fuji

Anton Bruckner

Fuji Anton Bruckner

Bruckner: Symphonies No. 1-9

Anton Bruckner

Brahms & Bruckner: Motets

Anton Bruckner

Brahms & Bruckner: Motets Anton Bruckner

Anton Bruckner : Symphony No. 8

Anton Bruckner

Bruckner: Symphony No. 7

Anton Bruckner

Bruckner: Symphony No. 7 Anton Bruckner
You may also like...

Sibelius: Luonnotar, Op. 70 & Other Orchestral Works

Lise Davidsen

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 & Francesca da Rimini

Tonhalle-Orchester Zürich

Gershwin : Rhapsody in Blue, An American in Paris...

Leonard Bernstein

Debussy: La mer, Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune – Ravel: Rapsodie espagnole

François-Xavier Roth

Grieg : Peer Gynt, Op. 23 - Piano Concerto

Edward Gardner

In your panoramas...
Herbert Von Karajan and The Grand Masters of Classical Music

30 years after his death, the Austrian Herbert von Karajan (Salzbourg 1908 – Anif 1989) still embodies the musical conductor like no other. In charge of the Berlin Philharmonic for 35 years (1955-1989), Karajan helped to elevate the orchestra to a level of global prestige. Throughout his career, he methodically diversified his repertoire: from Beethoven, Brahms and Bruckner to Verdi, Wagner and Strauss…

Picasso, when painting meets music

Picasso's modernist genius swiftly stretched beyond the pictorial and spread into music and dance, two art forms with which the Spanish painter always maintained a close relationship, to the point of influencing composer friends he met along the way.

Strauss & Kempe: Elective Affinities

The name of conductor Rudolf Kempe (1910-1976) is indissociable from those of composer Richard Strauss and the Dresden Staatskapelle orchestra. As Warner is now re-releasing the recordings made between 1970 and 1975, Qobuz is putting the spotlight on the Straussian legacy of a precise, often incisive conductor, who always paid the greatest attention to the text and its charms.

In the news...