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John Hiatt - Bring The Family

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Bring The Family

John Hiatt

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In 1987, John Hiatt, clean and sober and looking for an American record deal, was asked by an A&R man at a British label to name his dream band. After a little thought, Hiatt replied that if he had his druthers, he'd cut a record with Ry Cooder on guitar, Nick Lowe on bass, and Jim Keltner on drums. To Hiatt's surprise, he discovered all three were willing to work on his next album; Hiatt and his dream band went into an L.A. studio and knocked off Bring the Family in a mere four days, and the result was the best album of Hiatt's career. The musicians certainly make a difference here, generating a lean, smoky groove that's soulful and satisfying (Ry Cooder's guitar work is especially impressive, leaving no doubt of his singular gifts without ever overstepping its boundaries), but the real triumph here is Hiatt's songwriting. Bring the Family was recorded after a period of great personal turmoil for him, and for the most part the archly witty phrasemaker of his earlier albums was replaced by an wiser and more cautious writer who had a great deal to say about where life and love can take you. Hiatt had never written anything as nakedly confessional as "Tip of My Tongue" or "Learning How to Love You" before, and even straight-ahead R&B-style rockers like "Memphis in the Meantime" and "Thing Called Love" possessed a weight and resonance he never managed before. But Bring the Family isn't an album about tragedy, it's about responsibility and belatedly growing up, and it's appropriate that it was a band of seasoned veterans with their own stories to tell about life who helped Hiatt bring it across; it's a rich and satisfying slice of grown-up rock & roll.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

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Bring The Family

John Hiatt

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1
Memphis In The Meantime Album Version
00:03:58

John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

2
Alone In The Dark Album Version
00:04:42

John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

3
Thing Called Love Album Version
00:04:10

Ry Cooder, Background Vocalist, AssociatedPerformer - John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

4
Lipstick Sunset Album Version
00:04:11

Nick Lowe, Bass Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - Jim Keltner, Drums, AssociatedPerformer - Ry Cooder, Electric Guitar, AssociatedPerformer - John Hiatt, Acoustic Guitar, Vocalist, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

5
Have A Little Faith In Me Album Version
00:04:01

John Hiatt, Piano, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

6
Thank You Girl Album Version
00:04:08

John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

7
Tip Of My Tongue Album Version
00:05:52

John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

8
Your Dad Did Album Version
00:04:02

Ry Cooder, Sitar, AssociatedPerformer - John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

9
Stood Up Album Version
00:05:57

John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

10
Learning How To Love You Album Version
00:04:05

Nick Lowe, Background Vocalist, AssociatedPerformer - John Hiatt, MainArtist, ComposerLyricist - John Chelew, Producer - Larry Hirsch, Mixer, Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel - Joe Schiff, Asst. Recording Engineer, StudioPersonnel

℗ 1987 A&M Records

Album Description

In 1987, John Hiatt, clean and sober and looking for an American record deal, was asked by an A&R man at a British label to name his dream band. After a little thought, Hiatt replied that if he had his druthers, he'd cut a record with Ry Cooder on guitar, Nick Lowe on bass, and Jim Keltner on drums. To Hiatt's surprise, he discovered all three were willing to work on his next album; Hiatt and his dream band went into an L.A. studio and knocked off Bring the Family in a mere four days, and the result was the best album of Hiatt's career. The musicians certainly make a difference here, generating a lean, smoky groove that's soulful and satisfying (Ry Cooder's guitar work is especially impressive, leaving no doubt of his singular gifts without ever overstepping its boundaries), but the real triumph here is Hiatt's songwriting. Bring the Family was recorded after a period of great personal turmoil for him, and for the most part the archly witty phrasemaker of his earlier albums was replaced by an wiser and more cautious writer who had a great deal to say about where life and love can take you. Hiatt had never written anything as nakedly confessional as "Tip of My Tongue" or "Learning How to Love You" before, and even straight-ahead R&B-style rockers like "Memphis in the Meantime" and "Thing Called Love" possessed a weight and resonance he never managed before. But Bring the Family isn't an album about tragedy, it's about responsibility and belatedly growing up, and it's appropriate that it was a band of seasoned veterans with their own stories to tell about life who helped Hiatt bring it across; it's a rich and satisfying slice of grown-up rock & roll.
© Mark Deming /TiVo

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