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Shabazz Palaces|Black Up

Black Up

Shabazz Palaces

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Only a little more than a year after releasing two EPs -- a self-titled one, and Of Light -- Seattle's Shabazz Palaces signed to Sub Pop for their full-length debut. Even on a high-profile label, former Digable Planets member Ishmael Butler (formerly Butterfly) maintains a shroud of mystique, rapping under the facade of Palaceer Lazaro and purposely avoiding publicity, interviews, and liner credits. Considering his long-term time in the game, his wordplay is still surprisingly relevant, and, masked as Lazaro, he reinvents himself by adding an air of sophistication to the persona of a streetwise gangster. Jazz references are no longer the norm and Butler steers away from the blaxploitation slang and rhymes about being an insect or a creamy spy, but he still has a distinctive, surreal style of flowing. Compared to former albums by Digable Planets, Cherrywine, Camp Lo (Butler guested on some of their tracks), or even on the prior Shabazz Palaces EPs (which were pretty dark to begin with), Black Up is a much harder-edged album. There are no obvious singles, and the beats are murky, splintered, and synthesized, reminiscent of the space-age rap of acts like Deltron 3030, Kool Keith, and Dälek. In a year when minimal production is on the upswing -- a trend highlighted by the enormous buzz surrounding Odd Future and Tyler, the Creator's bare-boned productions -- Shabazz Palaces seems perfectly in tune with a modern underground movement that embraces the most ominous and difficult aspects of hip-hop. As the mainstream becomes more and more predictable, Shabazz Palaces’ inscrutability is a welcome change. Because the beats are so abstract, roots take precedent, and a strong presence on the microphone becomes the most important aspect. Butler fills this role with ease. His smooth, sparkling rhymes glue Knife Knights' watery environment together to create a provocative listen from start to finish.
© Jason Lymangrover /TiVo

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Black Up

Shabazz Palaces

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1
free press and curl Explicit
00:04:15

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

2
An echo from the hosts that profess infinitum Explicit
00:03:14

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

3
Are you... Can you... Were you? (Felt) Explicit
00:04:47

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

4
A treatease dedicated to The Avian Airess from North East Nubis (1000 questions, 1 answer) Explicit
00:02:45

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

5
Youlogy Explicit
00:03:58

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

6
Endeavors for Never (The last time we spoke you said you were not here.  I saw you though.)
00:02:51

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

7
Recollections of the wraith Explicit
00:03:35

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

8
The King's new clothes were made by his own hands
00:02:06

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

9
yeah you Explicit
00:03:20

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

10
Swerve... the reeping of all that is worthwhile (Noir not withstanding) Explicit
00:05:10

Shabazz Palaces, MainArtist

© 2011 Sub Pop Records ℗ 2011 Sub Pop Records

Album Description

Only a little more than a year after releasing two EPs -- a self-titled one, and Of Light -- Seattle's Shabazz Palaces signed to Sub Pop for their full-length debut. Even on a high-profile label, former Digable Planets member Ishmael Butler (formerly Butterfly) maintains a shroud of mystique, rapping under the facade of Palaceer Lazaro and purposely avoiding publicity, interviews, and liner credits. Considering his long-term time in the game, his wordplay is still surprisingly relevant, and, masked as Lazaro, he reinvents himself by adding an air of sophistication to the persona of a streetwise gangster. Jazz references are no longer the norm and Butler steers away from the blaxploitation slang and rhymes about being an insect or a creamy spy, but he still has a distinctive, surreal style of flowing. Compared to former albums by Digable Planets, Cherrywine, Camp Lo (Butler guested on some of their tracks), or even on the prior Shabazz Palaces EPs (which were pretty dark to begin with), Black Up is a much harder-edged album. There are no obvious singles, and the beats are murky, splintered, and synthesized, reminiscent of the space-age rap of acts like Deltron 3030, Kool Keith, and Dälek. In a year when minimal production is on the upswing -- a trend highlighted by the enormous buzz surrounding Odd Future and Tyler, the Creator's bare-boned productions -- Shabazz Palaces seems perfectly in tune with a modern underground movement that embraces the most ominous and difficult aspects of hip-hop. As the mainstream becomes more and more predictable, Shabazz Palaces’ inscrutability is a welcome change. Because the beats are so abstract, roots take precedent, and a strong presence on the microphone becomes the most important aspect. Butler fills this role with ease. His smooth, sparkling rhymes glue Knife Knights' watery environment together to create a provocative listen from start to finish.
© Jason Lymangrover /TiVo

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