San Francisco Symphony & Michael Tilson Thomas Berlioz: Roméo et Juliette

Berlioz: Roméo et Juliette

San Francisco Symphony & Michael Tilson Thomas

Hi-Res 24-bit – 96.00 kHz

Includes: 1 Digital booklet

Released on November 30, 2018 by San Francisco Symphony

Main artist: San Francisco Symphony

Genre: Classical > Symphonic Music

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Album : 1 disk - 9 tracks Total length : 01:36:46

  1. 1 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 1: Introduction and Prologue

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor - Sasha Cooke, Mezzo-soprano - Nicholas Phan, Tenor

  2. 2 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 2: Roméo Alone - Festivity at the Capulets'

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor

  3. 3 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 2: The Capulets' Garden - Love Scene

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor

  4. 4 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 2: Scherzo - Queen Mab

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor

  5. 5 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 3: Second Prologue - Juliet's Funeral Cortege

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor

  6. 6 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 3: Roméo in the Tomb of the Capulets

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor

  7. 7 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 3: Finale - Brawl between the Capulets and the Montagues

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor

  8. 8 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 3: Finale - Friar Laurence's Recitative and Aria

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor - Luca Pisaroni, Bass-Baritone

  9. 9 Roméo et Juliette Op. 17, H. 79, Pt. 3: Finale - Oath of Reconciliation

    San Francisco Symphony, Orchestra, MainArtist - Hector Berlioz, Composer - San Francisco Symphony Chorus, Chorus - Michael Tilson Thomas, Conductor, MainArtist - Nicholas Phan, Tenor Vocals Copyright : 2018 San Francisco Symphony 2018 San Francisco Symphony

About

Berlioz's preface for his dramatic symphony Romeo and Juliet reads as follows: "Although voices are frequently used in it, it is neither a concert opera, nor a cantata, but a choral symphony. The reason there is singing almost from the start is to prepare the listener’s mind for the dramatic scenes where the feelings and passions are to be expressed by the orchestra. This latter scene depicts the reconciliation of the two families and is the only one to belong to the genre of opera or oratorio. If, in the celebrated scenes in the garden and in the cemetery, the dialogue of the two lovers, Juliet’s asides and the impassioned pleas of Romeo are not sung, if in short the love duet and the duet of despair are entrusted to the orchestra, the reasons for this are numerous and easy to grasp. First, and this would by itself be a sufficient justification for the author, the work is a symphony and not an opera. Then, since duets of this kind have been treated countless times in vocal form by the greatest masters, it was wise as well as interesting to try another mode of expression. It is also because the very sublimity of this love made its depiction so dangerous for the composer that he needed to allow his imagination a freedom which the literal meaning of the words sung would have denied him. Hence the resort to instrumental language, a language which is richer, more varied, less finite, and through its very imprecision incomparably more powerful in such a situation." This new recording by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra brings together American mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke and tenor Nicholas Phan, as well as Italian bass-baritone Luca Pisaroni with Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas. Some people may disagree with the absence of French voices; it is true that the pronunciation of the soloists is a little wobbly at times, but let’s not forget that this is Berlioz: the overwhelming majority of the score is symphonic, and that is where the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra truly shines through. © SM/Qobuz

Hi-Res 24-bit – 96.00 kHz

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