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Orbital|Are We Here? (30 Something)  (Remixes)

Are We Here? (30 Something) (Remixes)

Orbital

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An Orbital fan looking for an album with 45 minutes of "Are We Here?" need look no further. Containing dance mixes, cut-and-paste warped versions, and a chill-out rendition, Are We Here? takes the title track and plays it nearly to death. The best showings here are the bookend tracks. "Who Are They?" is similar to the version that appears on Snivilisation, the album from which the single is taken. The final three minutes sees the brothers expertly warping the song's tones and Alison Goldfrapp's fragile vocals. The next three tracks are remixes, though they aren't labeled as such. In these mixes, the song takes on a slight industrial feel with storming bass, becomes something of a rave workout, and turns into a more spare ambient piece. "What Was That?" is rather beautiful, sounding somewhat wounded and less arranged, with the song's melody and Goldfrapp's humming emerging from the sonic ether. At more than ten minutes, the track's chiming nature eventually outwears its welcome. "Criminal Justice Bill" is an unfunny joke/political statement; it's four minutes of silence. "Industry Standard?" is a radio edit, and it's here perhaps that the song shines brightest. Are We Here? is a release best left for fans with Orbital posters covering their walls.
© Tim DiGravina /TiVo

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Are We Here? (30 Something) (Remixes)

Orbital

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1
Are We Here? (30 Something) (Dusky Remix)
00:05:48

Orbital, MainArtist - PHIL HARTNOLL, Composer - PAUL HARTNOLL, Composer - Dusky, Remixer

© 2021 Orbital Recordings Ltd. ℗ 2021 Orbital Recordings Ltd.

2
Are We Here? (30 Something) (Shanti Celeste Remix)
00:05:36

Orbital, MainArtist - PHIL HARTNOLL, Composer - PAUL HARTNOLL, Composer - Shanti Celeste, Remixer

© 2021 Orbital Recordings Ltd. ℗ 2021 Orbital Recordings Ltd.

Album Description

An Orbital fan looking for an album with 45 minutes of "Are We Here?" need look no further. Containing dance mixes, cut-and-paste warped versions, and a chill-out rendition, Are We Here? takes the title track and plays it nearly to death. The best showings here are the bookend tracks. "Who Are They?" is similar to the version that appears on Snivilisation, the album from which the single is taken. The final three minutes sees the brothers expertly warping the song's tones and Alison Goldfrapp's fragile vocals. The next three tracks are remixes, though they aren't labeled as such. In these mixes, the song takes on a slight industrial feel with storming bass, becomes something of a rave workout, and turns into a more spare ambient piece. "What Was That?" is rather beautiful, sounding somewhat wounded and less arranged, with the song's melody and Goldfrapp's humming emerging from the sonic ether. At more than ten minutes, the track's chiming nature eventually outwears its welcome. "Criminal Justice Bill" is an unfunny joke/political statement; it's four minutes of silence. "Industry Standard?" is a radio edit, and it's here perhaps that the song shines brightest. Are We Here? is a release best left for fans with Orbital posters covering their walls.
© Tim DiGravina /TiVo

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