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Folk - Paru le 1 janvier 2002 | Kahn Records

The Devil Makes Three have been setting the San Francisco Bay Area ablaze with their hyper driven version of old-time music. The trio's sound combines bluegrass, primitive country music, folk, rockabilly, Piedmont blues, and ragtime, played with a blazing post-punk attack. They don't have a drummer, but when Cooper McBean's percussive rhythm guitar accents and Lucia Turino's crackling slap-hand bass kick in, they supply a pounding four on the floor that drives the band as hard as any drummer might. Guitarist, lead singer, and chief songwriter Pete Bernhard completes the trio with vocals that are as rhythmic as they are melodic, a bluesy, jazzy style that's part Cab Calloway, part Ralph Stanley, part Blind Willie McTell. This eponymous debut was put out by the Devil Makes Three on their own Monkey Wrench label in 2002 and more recently picked up for national distribution by Milan, a label planning to pitch the trio's songs to filmmakers and television show producers looking for music with a folksy, rootsy feel. The songs on The Devil Makes Three are the backbone of the band's live shows, marked by impressive energy, mordant humor, and timeless lyrics. The remastering makes the instruments crackle and pop, and pushes the vocals a bit more up front. The Devil Makes Three inhabit a hardscrabble working-class world full of problem drinkers, tellers of tall tales, pirates, and troublemakers, but they deliver their desperate parables with a charming deadpan wit. "The Plank" is rollicking sea shanty that has the bandmembers watching their enemies walk the plank. "Graveyard" is a bleary waltz rife with images of shipwrecks, broken dreams, booze, and delirium tremens. The ragtime bounce of "Shades" is a portrait of a good-time girl and her beau, who are usually drunk by noon. "Chained to the Couch" mines the same territory. It's a syncopated blues that examines the life of an aging alcoholic looking back on his life with a so much regret that he's immobilized. "The Bullet" is a macabre cowboy ballad that dances on the edge of the grave with a smirk on its face, dreaming of the bullet that will bring sweet relief. The one spark of light is "For My Family," a beautiful prayer for good times, full of compassion and love. The four bonus tracks on the reissue, all recorded around the same time as the album, are as good as the original tracks. "Nobody's Dirty Business" is a ragtime arrangement of a Mississippi John Hurt tune driven by Turino's forceful bass; "Dynamite" is a bad-man ballad full of the band's trademark dark humor; and two live tracks close the album -- "Ocean's Cold" is a celebration of debauchery with an unnamed drummer adding to its frenetic energy, while "Fun Has Just Begun" describes the blood and confusion of a battlefield with a chilling devil-may-care humor. © j. poet /TiVo
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Country - Paru le 1 janvier 2006 | The Devil Makes Three

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Country - Paru le 26 août 2016 | New West Records

Releasing a covers album to follow up 2013's commercially and critically successful I'm a Stranger Here might seem like a curious commercial move, but Santa Clara's the Devil Makes Three are no ordinary band. For 15 years, the drummerless trio has issued album after album of stomping roots music that weds country, bluegrass, early blues, and jug band traditions. This set of classic and obscure American tunes is divided thematically (and in reverse order of Redemption & Ruin's title: it journeys from a raucous and sinful Saturday night to Sunday morning and the hereafter). All-star invited guests assist on various interpretations. The "Ruin" side opens with a smoking modern bluegrass read of Robert Johnson's "Drunken Hearted Man." Cooper McBean's popping five-string banjo introduces Pete Bernhard's lead vocal as Lucia Turino's upright bass and backing vocal pace him. Shawn Camp's stinging lead guitar and fiddle and Jerry Douglas' steel guitar get wrapped tightly in the tune's stomp and swagger. They stick with the blues, offering a rocking take on Muddy Waters' "Champagne and Reefer." Mickey Raphael's moaning harmonica rides above McBean's choogling electric six-string, paced by the bassline and Jerry Roe's primitive drum kit with Shad Cobb adding fiddle fills. An excellent ragtime version of Willie Nelson's "I Gotta Get Drunk" features Larry Paxton's tuba as a rhythmic complement to the bassline, with Douglas' Dobro chugging on the changes. The first half closes with countrified psychedelia as the trio enlists Emmylou Harris' harmony vocals on Townes Van Zandt's already otherworldly Americana blues "Waiting Around to Die." Fine as those six songs are, the second half, drenched in gospel, is even more successful, commencing with Phil Moore's popping "There'll Be a Jubilee" with McBean delivering a Carl Perkins-inspired rockabilly guitar pattern. Ralph Stanley's "I Am the Man Thomas," sung from the perspective of Jesus to his doubting disciple, is a 21st century bluegrass ramble with Jerry Roe providing percussion on spoons. Tom Waits' "Come on Up to the House" is completely (and beautifully) reimagined as country gospel with upright honky tonk piano, three-part vocal harmony, and a tenor banjo appending the acoustic guitar, bass, and Chance McCoy's fiddle. The traditional nugget "Down in the Valley" is a sprightly, high lonesome read done with absolute conviction and a finger-popping tempo thanks to Tim O'Brien's fiddle and Darrell Scott's Dobro that add to the urgency in the band's attack. Hank Williams' "The Angel of Death" closes the set on a reflective note, but the soul in Bernhard's vocal -- accompanied by his bandmates' haunted harmonies -- in this waltz-time country blues is chilling. Dan Dugmore's pedal steel and Douglas' acoustic one are appended by Duane Eddy's skeletal reverb-o-phonic electric leads, a viola, and fiddle. Redemption & Ruin is a fine covers album: it not only illuminates and adds new dimensions to these songs, but it unmistakably reflects the Devil Makes Three's musical persona, making it a welcome addition to their catalog. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Country - Paru le 24 août 2018 | New West Records

Chains Are Broken could refer to the Devil Makes Three themselves, as the longtime trio have decided to make touring drummer Stefan Amidon an official member and bring him into the studio to record their first collection of original material since 2013's I'm a Stranger Here. It's a big move eclipsed by the hiring of Ted Hutt, a producer who helmed records by Dropkick Murphys, the Gaslight Anthem, and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones -- rockers whose music is a far cry from the rough-and-tumble that's the Devil Makes Three's specialty. They haven't abandoned their signatures -- they still sing songs of redemption and ruin, as adept with galloping rave-ups as they are with heartache -- but Hutt helps the Devil add color to their noir, a transition that also helps the group usher in some new styles. "Paint My Face" opens with ringing guitars straight out of the '60s; "Castles" and "Bad Idea" are filled with chunky rock & roll riffs, each one sounding like a natural extension of the Devil Makes Three's sly Americana. These styles may suit the band, yet the big, robust production of Chains Are Broken can still startle upon the first listen or two. Once the shock of the bigger, bolder sound fades, Chains Are Broken reveals itself as a perhaps inevitable maturation for the Devil Makes Three, one that broadens their horizons while retaining their vigor, humor, and heart. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Paru le 9 août 2019 | New West Records

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Folk - Paru le 1 janvier 2002 | The Devil Makes Three

The Devil Makes Three have been setting the San Francisco Bay Area ablaze with their hyper driven version of old-time music. The trio's sound combines bluegrass, primitive country music, folk, rockabilly, Piedmont blues, and ragtime, played with a blazing post-punk attack. They don't have a drummer, but when Cooper McBean's percussive rhythm guitar accents and Lucia Turino's crackling slap-hand bass kick in, they supply a pounding four on the floor that drives the band as hard as any drummer might. Guitarist, lead singer, and chief songwriter Pete Bernhard completes the trio with vocals that are as rhythmic as they are melodic, a bluesy, jazzy style that's part Cab Calloway, part Ralph Stanley, part Blind Willie McTell. This eponymous debut was put out by the Devil Makes Three on their own Monkey Wrench label in 2002 and more recently picked up for national distribution by Milan, a label planning to pitch the trio's songs to filmmakers and television show producers looking for music with a folksy, rootsy feel. The songs on The Devil Makes Three are the backbone of the band's live shows, marked by impressive energy, mordant humor, and timeless lyrics. The remastering makes the instruments crackle and pop, and pushes the vocals a bit more up front. The Devil Makes Three inhabit a hardscrabble working-class world full of problem drinkers, tellers of tall tales, pirates, and troublemakers, but they deliver their desperate parables with a charming deadpan wit. "The Plank" is rollicking sea shanty that has the bandmembers watching their enemies walk the plank. "Graveyard" is a bleary waltz rife with images of shipwrecks, broken dreams, booze, and delirium tremens. The ragtime bounce of "Shades" is a portrait of a good-time girl and her beau, who are usually drunk by noon. "Chained to the Couch" mines the same territory. It's a syncopated blues that examines the life of an aging alcoholic looking back on his life with a so much regret that he's immobilized. "The Bullet" is a macabre cowboy ballad that dances on the edge of the grave with a smirk on its face, dreaming of the bullet that will bring sweet relief. The one spark of light is "For My Family," a beautiful prayer for good times, full of compassion and love. The four bonus tracks on the reissue, all recorded around the same time as the album, are as good as the original tracks. "Nobody's Dirty Business" is a ragtime arrangement of a Mississippi John Hurt tune driven by Turino's forceful bass; "Dynamite" is a bad-man ballad full of the band's trademark dark humor; and two live tracks close the album -- "Ocean's Cold" is a celebration of debauchery with an unnamed drummer adding to its frenetic energy, while "Fun Has Just Begun" describes the blood and confusion of a battlefield with a chilling devil-may-care humor. © j. poet /TiVo
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CD1,49 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 26 août 2016 | New West Records

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Country - Paru le 28 octobre 2020 | Kahn Records

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Rock - Paru le 10 mai 2019 | Kahn Records

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Country - Paru le 29 juillet 2016 | New West Records

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Country - Paru le 2 décembre 2016 | Kahn Records

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Folk - Paru le 16 juin 2014 | The Devil Makes Three

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Country - Paru le 8 juin 2018 | New West Records

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Country - Paru le 17 août 2018 | New West Records

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Country - Paru le 13 juillet 2018 | New West Records

A partir de :
HI-RES16,49 €
CD11,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 26 août 2016 | New West Records

Hi-Res
A partir de :
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Country - Paru le 3 juin 2016 | New West Records

L'interprète

The Devil Makes Three dans le magazine