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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 26 juillet 2019 | Fiction

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Mini Mansions hinted they were getting more serious -- or, at least, more confessional -- with the title track of their 2018 EP Works Every Time. As it turns out, that was just a glimpse of the musical and emotional territory they cover on Guy Walks into a Bar…. The band's third album presents singer/multi-instrumentalist Michael Shuman's ill-fated, whirlwind relationship with his ex-fiancée as a joke with a giddy setup -- and a painful punch line. The steep rise and fall of this romance honed Mini Mansions' already sharp songwriting, and the first half of Guy Walks into a Bar… is as immediate and irresistible as love at first sight. From the slow-motion, disco-tinged prologue of "We Should Be Dancing" to the fizzy piano pop of "I'm in Love," these songs are made out of the addictive adrenaline and endorphin rush of a new relationship. At times, Mini Mansions sound like they might be even more in love with love (or lust) itself than with an actual woman: "Don't Even Know You" is a rose-tinted montage of romantic images with helium-laced vocals that would do Marc Bolan proud, while "Bad Things (That Make You Feel Good)" -- which sounds like Devo on the prowl -- and "Forgot Your Name"'s chrome-plated new wave get carried away by their own head-over-heels momentum. Since Guy Walks into a Bar… begins on such a high, its inevitable lows hit all the harder. On the album's second half, Mini Mansions don't just fall out of love; they fall in love in reverse. In a neat mirror image, the disco and new wave thrills of the album's first half curdle on the sullenly slinky "GummyBear" and "Living in the Future," a glittery yet bitter piece of synth-rock that could be a face-off between Supertramp and Sparks. The band manages to make heartache almost as appealing as falling in love on "Works Every Time," where lyrics like "sky's flashing like a zoetrope as the stars fall apart on the floor," reflect Shuman's longing with fittingly glam-rock imagery. They also flip the script with "Hey Lover," a duet that sounds like a soft-focus love song until the Kills' Alison Mosshart responds to Shuman with a tender "hey, f*cker" before the song builds to climactic harmonies. Moments like these prove that even when they're heartbroken, Mini Mansions are remarkably witty, and the way they combine their cleverness with newfound emotional depth makes Guy Walks into a Bar… their most satisfying album yet. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Paru le 23 mars 2015 | Electro Magnetic Corporation

Pour son deuxième album, le trio composé de Michael Schuman (bassiste des Queens of the Stone Age), Tyler Parkford et Zachary Dawes a choisi le producteur T-Bone Burnett (Roy Orbison, Elton John, Diana Krall) et son propre label pour un rock à la fois moderne et vintage. Avec une touche de pop brillante (Fantasy) et de saturation psyché (Mirror Mountain), The Great Pretenders ressemble plutôt à une démence musicale maîtrisée qu’à un hommage aux Platters. Avec la collaboration d’Alex Turner (Artic Monkeys) sur Vertigo et de Brian Wilson (The Beach Boys) sur Any Emotion, les Mini Mansions oscillent entre Nick Cave et Elliott Smith pour un opus qui se résume en 3 mots selon Michael Schuman : « amour, mort et existentialisme ». © LR/Qobuz
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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 28 septembre 2018 | Fiction

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Two years after the release of The Great Pretenders, Mini Mansions' Michael Shuman, Zach Dawes, and Tyler Parkford finally had some downtime from their other bands -- Queens of the Stone Age, Last Shadow Puppets, and Arctic Monkeys, respectively -- to record some of their own songs. As on The Great Pretenders, the Works Every Time EP reveals more of Mini Mansions' vulnerability without losing any of their music's glitz and glam. The title track is one of the band's smoothest, poppiest songs yet, with glistening synths and '80s guitar solos polishing soul-baring lyrics like "I don't even know what I'm looking for" to a high shine. Later, "This Bullet"'s synth rock conflates falling in love with a death wish. There's more than a little synthwave influence on Works Every Time, but Mini Mansions come by it honestly; keyboards have been an integral part of their sound since the start, and the juxtaposition of sexy electro sounds and desperate words on "Midnight in Tokyo" proves they know how to wield a synth more expressively than many up-and-comers. While the industrial-tinged reworking of Edwyn Collins' "A Girl Like You" isn't quite as strong as some of their other covers, it echoes the way the EP's original songs teeter between lust and anxiety. As it distills where they've been and where they're going, Works Every Time reaffirms that Mini Mansions' EPs are just as important to their body of work as their albums. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Paru le 30 mai 2011 | Rekords Rekords

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Rock - Paru le 24 février 2015 | Electro Magnetic Corporation

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Rock - Paru le 2 décembre 2014 | Electro Magnetic Corporation

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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 17 octobre 2019 | Fiction

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A partir de :
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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 28 septembre 2018 | Fiction

Two years after the release of The Great Pretenders, Mini Mansions' Michael Shuman, Zach Dawes, and Tyler Parkford finally had some downtime from their other bands -- Queens of the Stone Age, Last Shadow Puppets, and Arctic Monkeys, respectively -- to record some of their own songs. As on The Great Pretenders, the Works Every Time EP reveals more of Mini Mansions' vulnerability without losing any of their music's glitz and glam. The title track is one of the band's smoothest, poppiest songs yet, with glistening synths and '80s guitar solos polishing soul-baring lyrics like "I don't even know what I'm looking for" to a high shine. Later, "This Bullet"'s synth rock conflates falling in love with a death wish. There's more than a little synthwave influence on Works Every Time, but Mini Mansions come by it honestly; keyboards have been an integral part of their sound since the start, and the juxtaposition of sexy electro sounds and desperate words on "Midnight in Tokyo" proves they know how to wield a synth more expressively than many up-and-comers. While the industrial-tinged reworking of Edwyn Collins' "A Girl Like You" isn't quite as strong as some of their other covers, it echoes the way the EP's original songs teeter between lust and anxiety. As it distills where they've been and where they're going, Works Every Time reaffirms that Mini Mansions' EPs are just as important to their body of work as their albums. © Heather Phares /TiVo
A partir de :
CD13,49 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 26 juillet 2019 | Fiction

Mini Mansions hinted they were getting more serious -- or, at least, more confessional -- with the title track of their 2018 EP Works Every Time. As it turns out, that was just a glimpse of the musical and emotional territory they cover on Guy Walks into a Bar…. The band's third album presents singer/multi-instrumentalist Michael Shuman's ill-fated, whirlwind relationship with his ex-fiancée as a joke with a giddy setup -- and a painful punch line. The steep rise and fall of this romance honed Mini Mansions' already sharp songwriting, and the first half of Guy Walks into a Bar… is as immediate and irresistible as love at first sight. From the slow-motion, disco-tinged prologue of "We Should Be Dancing" to the fizzy piano pop of "I'm in Love," these songs are made out of the addictive adrenaline and endorphin rush of a new relationship. At times, Mini Mansions sound like they might be even more in love with love (or lust) itself than with an actual woman: "Don't Even Know You" is a rose-tinted montage of romantic images with helium-laced vocals that would do Marc Bolan proud, while "Bad Things (That Make You Feel Good)" -- which sounds like Devo on the prowl -- and "Forgot Your Name"'s chrome-plated new wave get carried away by their own head-over-heels momentum. Since Guy Walks into a Bar… begins on such a high, its inevitable lows hit all the harder. On the album's second half, Mini Mansions don't just fall out of love; they fall in love in reverse. In a neat mirror image, the disco and new wave thrills of the album's first half curdle on the sullenly slinky "GummyBear" and "Living in the Future," a glittery yet bitter piece of synth-rock that could be a face-off between Supertramp and Sparks. The band manages to make heartache almost as appealing as falling in love on "Works Every Time," where lyrics like "sky's flashing like a zoetrope as the stars fall apart on the floor," reflect Shuman's longing with fittingly glam-rock imagery. They also flip the script with "Hey Lover," a duet that sounds like a soft-focus love song until the Kills' Alison Mosshart responds to Shuman with a tender "hey, f*cker" before the song builds to climactic harmonies. Moments like these prove that even when they're heartbroken, Mini Mansions are remarkably witty, and the way they combine their cleverness with newfound emotional depth makes Guy Walks into a Bar… their most satisfying album yet. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 17 octobre 2019 | Fiction

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Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 19 mai 2018 | Mini Mansions

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Rock - Paru le 2 novembre 2010 | Ipecac Recordings

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Pop/Rock - Paru le 6 juin 2011 | Rekords Rekords

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Rock - Paru le 3 février 2015 | Electro Magnetic Corporation

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CD2,49 €

Rock - Paru le 21 octobre 2014 | Electro Magnetic Corporation