Votre panier est vide

Catégories :

Artistes similaires

Les albums

A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 4 octobre 2010 | Domino Recording Co

Distinctions 5/6 de Magic - Sélection Les Inrocks - 3 étoiles Technikart
Pour son sixième album, le quatuor de Liverpool fait évoluer sa marque de fabrique jusqu'ici inébranlable : les riffs en série et les chants fiévreux font désormais place à un nuage suave composé de clavecins, de cithares et de cordes. Mélodies et douceur sont désormais les maître-mots du groupe qui crée une symphonie ping-pong d'une beauté pop éblouissante. Produit par John Congleton (Bill Callahan, St Vincent) et enregistré à l’Elevator Studio de Liverpool, Bubblgum marque un sommet dans la carrière de Clinic.
A partir de :
HI-RES11,99 €
CD7,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 10 mai 2019 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res
A partir de :
HI-RES1,04 €
CD0,69 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 2 juin 2021 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res
A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 5 mars 2002 | Domino Recording Co

Right down to its gritty, mod-punk art direction, Walking With Thee seems like it should fit right in with Clinic's previous work. Indeed, the group's second full-length album could've been a carbon copy of their debut, Internal Wrangler, but to Clinic's credit, the band makes a few changes, opting for a smoother production and a quieter, more implosive sound than their previous work offered. Frustratingly, though, most of these changes end up detracting from the group's strengths and diluting the album's impact. Walking With Thee's production is far from slick, but a huge part of Clinic's appeal was that the band seemed to record in an underwater garage, giving their songs a fuzzy, cavernous sound that made their messy, thrashy moments even more dangerously alluring and their ballads that much more affecting. Stripped nearly bare of reverb and static, much of Walking With Thee sounds incomplete, particularly on the almost-punk of "Pet Eunuch," "Welcome," and "The Equaliser," which, with its rattling percussion and driving bassline, could've rivaled Internal Wrangler's ugly-beautiful intensity if had a little more oomph. However, the album isn't a total washout -- for every lackluster moment, there's one that connects. "The Vulture" and "Walking With Thee" nearly reach the frenzied, strangely sexy, bottom-dwelling heights (depths?) of Clinic's best work. And beginning with the chilly, hypnotic opener, "Harmony," many of the album's quietest moments are the most compelling. Filmic tracks like "Come Into Our Room" and the dreamy finale "For the Wars" follow suit, though their brooding, stark sound will only strengthen the Radiohead comparisons. There's a lot of promise on Walking With Thee, but nothing here touches the deadpan cool of Internal Wrangler's "The Second Line," the detached poignancy of "Distortion," or the raw energy of "Second Foot Stomp." The band sounds like they're still figuring out how to make the urgency of their previous work jell with a more polished, experimental sound, which makes Walking With Thee not so much a progression or regression as a step sideways. Clinic is still one of the most intriguing acts around, and while this isn't the masterpiece the band has the potential to deliver, an interesting disappointment from them is still better than a successful but boring album from a less-inspired group. © Heather Phares /TiVo
A partir de :
HI-RES1,04 €
CD0,69 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 22 juillet 2021 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res
A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 mai 2000 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
CD5,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 4 mars 2013 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 1 janvier 1999 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 29 octobre 2006 | Domino Recording Co

At their best, Clinic's songs are puzzles that, despite being made of simple pieces, are nigh-on impossible to figure out. The band goes deeper into their mysterious, noisy blankness on Visitations, which they've described as a "party album." Though it actually seems better suited for a bad trip or a séance, there's no doubt that this is some of Clinic's most consistently exciting work since Internal Wrangler (the band reunited with Gareth Jones, who mixed Wrangler, for this album). And while there aren't any drastic changes here, by the time the surging opening track, "Family," literally ends with a bang, it's clear that the men of Clinic are back to their gleefully cryptic selves. The band doesn't spend much time with the extremes of their sound -- "Tusk," a fiery rave-up, and the torchy title track are as far as it goes for Clinic's thrashy and reflective sides. Instead, they delve into their weird middle ground with spectacularly odd results, like "If You Could Read Your Mind"'s gypsy psych-rock and "Gideon"'s spaghetti Western punk. Zithers, autoharps, theremins, and percussion of all kinds give Visitations a creaky, antiquated feel, especially on the evil nursery rhyme folk of "Jigsaw Man"; even when Clinic goes acoustic, they've got a lock groove of bongos and rattlesnake rhythms powering them. They also craft some strikingly surreal audio collages: "Animal Human" begins with haunted house doo-wop incantations, then segues to a rumbling bassline and boom-chick-a-wow guitars straight out of a '70s porn soundtrack. "Children of Kellog" starts with a flourish of brass before moving to a lumbering groove sprinkled with xylophones, then an explosion-like gong sounds and the song morphs into a pretty slow jam with sawing sound effects in the background. In fact, there are only a couple of songs on Visitations that feel close to predictable. The languidly strummy "Paradise" sounds almost exactly like "Kimberley" from 1998's Cement Mixer EP, and "Harvest"'s insistent bass, tribal beat, and garbled vocals are so typically Clinic that they make the song too safe of a choice for Visitations' single -- especially since "The Second Line," the song that made their name in the first place, sounded like nothing else at the time. Overall, though, this dark, knotty album shows that Clinic's muse is back. Visitations may not be as immediate as Walking with Thee or Winchester Cathedral, but that's exactly what makes it intriguing -- and a welcome return to form. © Heather Phares /TiVo
A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 12 novembre 2012 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
CD1,94 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 2 juillet 2002 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
CD7,99 €

Pop/Rock - Paru le 24 août 2004 | Domino Recording Co

There's a fine line between expression within a style of music and just playing it by number, and this problem is compounded when a band or artist crafts an especially distinctive sound. Just how long does it take until they cross that line? In Clinic's case, it took a slew of fascinating singles and three albums of diminishing returns before their mix of garage, punk, dub, and pop started to sound stale. In all fairness, the band's limitations were beginning to show on Walking With Thee, but the fact that Winchester Cathedral comes two and a half years after that album -- and was described initially as "a marked shift from Walking With Thee's darker character" -- makes it all the more disappointing that this is, overall, the least inspired work of Clinic's career to date. Winchester Cathedral isn't a verbatim rehashing of their previous work (although it is uncomfortably easy to graft the melody of Walking With Thee's "Come Into Our Room" onto "Thank You [For Living]"): it's neither the wonderfully cavernous clatter of their early singles and Internal Wrangler, nor the frosty detachment of their previous album. Winchester Cathedral's most gnawing problem isn't that the band fails to recapture past glories, it's that Clinic seem to have lost the spark that would keep their current work interesting. At several points during the album, it feels like the band has forgotten how much dark, mischievous fun it used to be, and that makes it hard for listeners to remember as well. On songs like "Circle of Fifths" and "W.D.Y.Y.B.," the rhythms churn, evil surf guitars abound, and Ade Blackburn once again sounds cryptically pissed off, but this time around, it's just not intriguing enough to unravel what he's going on about. The dull, grating instrumental "Vertical Takeoff in Egypt" wouldn't even have been a B-side during the band's peak. In many ways, Clinic aren't really much of an album-format band. As good as Internal Wrangler was, the group excelled at singles, which allowed them to include their noisy, experimental side as well as their more full-fledged songs in short bursts that left the listener wanting more. As they've tried to adapt their sound to the album format, they've become more subtle, and most of Winchester Cathedral's pleasures are found in its subtleties. Rattling percussion and hints of Middle Eastern and klezmer music snake their way through songs like "August." "Anne" boasts a sarabande-like intro, and "The Magician"'s droning clarinets almost save it from being a good but typical Clinic song. And fortunately, the band's skill with a ballad hasn't deserted them: "Home" suggests "Goodnight Georgie" recast as the theme to a beatnik spaghetti Western. "Falstaff," meanwhile, is one of the most striking songs of Clinic's career: blending oddly soulful, nearly Smokey Robinson-like verses with bittersweet, very British choruses, it's eerie, affecting, strangely sensual -- and also makes the rest of Winchester Cathedral all the more frustrating as it offers proof that Clinic are indeed still capable of pushing their sound in different yet familiar directions. It's a cliché to say that a band was better back in the day, but albums like this are the reason this cliché exists. If it was pared down to its best tracks, Winchester Cathedral would make a solid EP. As it stands, it's far from bad, but it's a little boring, which is worse than bad from a band that has sounded so unique in the past. © Heather Phares /TiVo
A partir de :
CD1,94 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 1 juillet 2000 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
HI-RES1,04 €
CD0,69 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 7 septembre 2021 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res
A partir de :
HI-RES11,99 €
CD7,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - À paraître le 22 octobre 2021 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res
A partir de :
CD2,49 €

Techno - Paru le 28 février 2019 | Three Hands Records

A partir de :
CD0,99 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 19 septembre 2010 | Domino Recording Co

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 8 avril 2019 | Domino Recording Co

Téléchargement indisponible
A partir de :
CD1,29 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 5 mars 2002 | Domino Recording Co

A partir de :
HI-RES1,04 €
CD0,69 €

Alternatif et Indé - Paru le 8 avril 2019 | Domino Recording Co

Hi-Res