Catégories :
Panier 0

Votre panier est vide

Prince - The Rainbow Children

Mes favoris

Cet élément a bien été ajouté / retiré de vos favoris.

The Rainbow Children

Prince

Disponible en
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Musique illimitée

Écoutez cet album en haute-qualité dès maintenant dans nos applications

Démarrer ma période d'essai et lancer l'écoute de cet album

Profitez de cet album sur les apps Qobuz grâce à votre abonnement

Souscrire

Profitez de cet album sur les apps Qobuz grâce à votre abonnement

Téléchargement digital

Téléchargez cet album dans la qualité de votre choix

Langue disponible : anglais

Billed as Prince's most controversial album -- at least by his press agency and label -- upon its release in the fall of 2001, The Rainbow Children was arguably his most curious album to date, which isn't necessarily the same thing as controversial. It could have been controversial, that's for sure, given that it follows his conversion to the Jehovah's Witnesses and that it trumpets his faith, over the most elastic, jazziest backing music he's made. If Prince hadn't marginalized himself through his record company battles, multi-disc sets, and botched superstar comebacks, this could have been genuinely controversial, since people would be paying attention to what he's doing. As of 2001, nobody outside of the diehards -- those who sign up for the Paisley Park subscription service and those that will seek out an album like The Rainbow Children, which was initially only available through the Internet -- was really paying enough attention to listen to this record, since they were the only ones to sit through the cascade of arcania he turned out after his liberation from Warner. Since they're so deeply immersed in this work, they would realize that musically The Rainbow Children is his most cohesive set since The Gold Experience, and the only one to really push past his traditional limits since then (which, admittedly, is still much more imaginative). And, you know, that's really too bad, because as a musical experience, this is pretty rich, demonstrating not just that Prince knows no borders, but that his music effortlessly mutates within the course of one song, perhaps drawing from his standard book of tricks -- jazz fusion, smooth soul, lite psychedelia, hard rock, and funk general weirdness -- but always sounding unpredictable and rewarding. It's too bad, then, that the very thing that inspired the album for its creator is what will turn off even those diehards that stuck with him this long, seeking out this album -- namely, its religious views. It's not that Prince has become a Jehovah's Witness -- any objective listener really wouldn't care -- but it's that his message doesn't support the music and doesn't fit with the sounds or the approach; it's hard to shut it out, not just because the words are so prominent, but because they're delivered in so many different voices (most distracting of all, the electronically altered basso profundo voice last heard on the decidedly secular "Bob George"), often in short, two-minute songs. This becomes a little overwhelming about halfway through, when the opera comes in on "Wedding Feast," reminding us that this is indeed a concept album, then delving into three eight-minute jams to conclude the record. It all winds up as a bit much, but it doesn't erase the musical facts: this is Prince at his most focused and rewarding in a long time, since Emancipation really. Too bad nobody outside of the diehards cares at this point.
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Plus d'informations

The Rainbow Children

Prince

launch qobuz app J'ai déjà téléchargé Qobuz pour Mac OS Ouvrir

download qobuz app Je n'ai pas encore téléchargé Qobuz pour Mac OS Télécharger l'app

Copier le lien pour partager la page

Vous êtes actuellement en train d’écouter des extraits.

Écoutez plus de 70 millions de titres avec votre abonnement illimité.

Écoutez cet album et plus de 70 millions de titres avec votre abonnement illimité.

1
Rainbow Children
00:10:03

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Najee, Flute, Saxophone - Milenia, Vocal - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

2
Muse 2 the Pharaoh
00:04:21

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

3
Digital Garden
00:04:07

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other - Kip Blackshire, Vocal

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

4
The Work Pt. 1
00:04:28

Larry Graham, Bass - Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other - Kip Blackshire, Vocal - The Hornheadz, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

5
Everywhere
00:02:54

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - The Hornheadz, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

6
The Sensual Everafter
00:02:58

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

7
Mellow
00:04:24

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Najee, Flute - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other - The Hornheadz, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

8
1+1+1 is 3
00:05:17

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other - Kip Blackshire, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

9
Deconstruction
00:01:59

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - Kip Blackshire, Vocal

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

10
Wedding Feast
00:00:54

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - Kip Blackshire, Vocal

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

11
She Loves Me 4 Me
00:02:49

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

12
Family Name
00:08:16

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Femi Jiya, Vocal - Mr. Hayes, Vocal - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

13
The Everlasting Now
00:08:18

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other - The Hornheadz, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

14
Last December
00:07:57

Larry Graham, Bass - Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer - Milenia, Vocal - John Blackwell, the Magnificent, Other

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

15
Last December (Reprise)
00:00:37

Prince, Composer, Lyricist, Arranger, MainArtist, AssociatedPerformer

(P) 2001 NPG Records, Inc. Manufactured and Distributed by Legacy Recordings

Descriptif de l'album

Billed as Prince's most controversial album -- at least by his press agency and label -- upon its release in the fall of 2001, The Rainbow Children was arguably his most curious album to date, which isn't necessarily the same thing as controversial. It could have been controversial, that's for sure, given that it follows his conversion to the Jehovah's Witnesses and that it trumpets his faith, over the most elastic, jazziest backing music he's made. If Prince hadn't marginalized himself through his record company battles, multi-disc sets, and botched superstar comebacks, this could have been genuinely controversial, since people would be paying attention to what he's doing. As of 2001, nobody outside of the diehards -- those who sign up for the Paisley Park subscription service and those that will seek out an album like The Rainbow Children, which was initially only available through the Internet -- was really paying enough attention to listen to this record, since they were the only ones to sit through the cascade of arcania he turned out after his liberation from Warner. Since they're so deeply immersed in this work, they would realize that musically The Rainbow Children is his most cohesive set since The Gold Experience, and the only one to really push past his traditional limits since then (which, admittedly, is still much more imaginative). And, you know, that's really too bad, because as a musical experience, this is pretty rich, demonstrating not just that Prince knows no borders, but that his music effortlessly mutates within the course of one song, perhaps drawing from his standard book of tricks -- jazz fusion, smooth soul, lite psychedelia, hard rock, and funk general weirdness -- but always sounding unpredictable and rewarding. It's too bad, then, that the very thing that inspired the album for its creator is what will turn off even those diehards that stuck with him this long, seeking out this album -- namely, its religious views. It's not that Prince has become a Jehovah's Witness -- any objective listener really wouldn't care -- but it's that his message doesn't support the music and doesn't fit with the sounds or the approach; it's hard to shut it out, not just because the words are so prominent, but because they're delivered in so many different voices (most distracting of all, the electronically altered basso profundo voice last heard on the decidedly secular "Bob George"), often in short, two-minute songs. This becomes a little overwhelming about halfway through, when the opera comes in on "Wedding Feast," reminding us that this is indeed a concept album, then delving into three eight-minute jams to conclude the record. It all winds up as a bit much, but it doesn't erase the musical facts: this is Prince at his most focused and rewarding in a long time, since Emancipation really. Too bad nobody outside of the diehards cares at this point.
© Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

À propos

Améliorer cette page album

Qobuz logo Pourquoi acheter sur Qobuz ?

Les promotions du moment...

A Love Supreme

John Coltrane

A Love Supreme John Coltrane

The Black Saint And The Sinner Lady

Charles Mingus

Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No.3 / Ravel: Piano Concerto In G Major

Martha Argerich

The Blues And The Abstract Truth

Oliver Nelson

À découvrir également
Par Prince

Welcome 2 America

Prince

Sign O' The Times (Super Deluxe)

Prince

Purple Rain

Prince

Purple Rain Prince

Parade - Music from the Motion Picture Under the Cherry Moon

Prince

Purple Rain Deluxe (Expanded Edition)

Prince

Playlists

Dans la même thématique...

Funk Is My Religion

Nils Landgren Funk Unit

Funk Is My Religion Nils Landgren Funk Unit

High Times: Singles 1992-2006 ((Remastered))

Jamiroquai

Where Do We Go From Here

Dumpstaphunk

Maggot Brain

Funkadelic

Maggot Brain Funkadelic
Les Grands Angles...
Tim Burton en 10 albums

Qu’il tourne en prises de vues réelles ou en stop motion, Tim Burton a construit en plus de trente ans un monde cinématographique où le merveilleux poétique côtoie le gothique et l’humour macabre. À quelques exceptions près, c’est le compositeur Danny Elfman qui l’a épaulé dans cette aventure, formant un duo symbiotique : sans les images de Burton, la musique de Elfman n’aurait pas la même saveur et vice versa, ce qu’ils ont encore prouvé en 2019 avec le bouleversant “Dumbo”.

Le Prince des années 80

Dans la famille funk, Prince Rogers Nelson, qui a nous a quittés il y a cinq ans, en avril 2016, fut un genre à lui seul. En presque 40 ans de carrière, il a réussi à mêler l’héritage des pères fondateurs (James Brown, Sly Stone et George Clinton) à des influences aussi bien rock’n’roll qu’électroniques voire jazz. Un groove exubérant et bluffant qui brilla essentiellement entre 1978 et 1988…

La nu soul en 10 albums

Au milieu des 90’s, alors que le hip-hop vit son âge d’or, la soul entame aussi sa révolution. Avec Erykah Badu, D’Angelo, Jill Scott et quelques autres, le genre retrouve la classe, la sobriété et le raffinement qui animaient les albums de Marvin Gaye, Curtis Mayfield ou Roberta Flack. Après les années de règne du R&B sirupeux ultra-commercial, la nu soul, nettement plus underground, ravive la flame de la soul originelle, dans ses arrangements comme dans ses textes. Un mouvement bref mais hautement influent.

Dans l'actualité...