Your basket is empty

Categories :

Albums

From
CD€34.99

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released January 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
CD€34.99

Symphonic Music - Released January 12, 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
These are the recordings of Mozart created by Ferenc Fricsay at the head of the Berlin RIAS orchestra, now known at the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, of which he was the musical director from 1948 to 1954, and then from 1959 to his premature death in 1963. More precisely, these recordings date from 1951 and 1952, still in mono (high-fidelity music lovers take note); the majority having been recorded in the studio, the last few in concert. They cover almost all the symphonies of Mozart's youth, from No. 1 to No. 9, and No. 23 and No. 27; as well as a number of serenades and cassations, and some rather less-usual concertos - the Concerto for bassoon, and the Sinfonia Concertante for Four Winds – and an air from the Noces with Suzanne Danco as well as a duet from Don Giovanni with Danco and Rita Streich. The impeccable sound recording by Radio Berlin, even in mono, attests to the immense musical talent and vitality of the conductor, a student of Bartók (whom he would always faithfully champion) and Kodály, who disappeared at the unreasonably-young age of 48. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€19.49€34.99(44%)
CD€13.99€24.99(44%)

Classical - Released October 6, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
First you think : “here we go... yet agaaaaain another recording of Chopin’s two concertos”, then you read ‘world premiere’ in the description. Surprising, isn’t it? And yet, this is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth! This world premiere is describing the brand new orchestrations realised by Mikhail Pletnev. These re-orchestrations give prominence to the much more chamber-like aspect of the accompaniment, which admittedly is a little pale and formulaic in the version that we’ve known for almost two centuries. Pletnev has moderated the music score, thinning out some parts while not changing a single note: the piano part remains the same, and in the orchestra nothing changes apart from the instrumental assignation. In addition to those two concertos that are much more colorful, the pianist Daniil Trifonov offers us a handful of tributes to Chopin by his peers and successors: Schumann, whose admiration for the Polish composer wasn’t reciprocated, Grieg, Barber and Tchaikovsky, and most of all Mompou’s splendid series of Variations on a Theme of Chopin. New from old, but always for the best we won’t hasten to add. © SM/Qobuz
From
HI-RES€23.49
CD€16.49

Classical - Released September 22, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
After his exciting journey into the musical tradition of Eastern Europe (Journey East) and the Baroque sound-scapes of J.S. Bach (Bach), Nemanja Radulović now turns his attention to the Russian master of the Romantic era, Tchaikovsky, excelling as violinist and (in an arrangement of the famed Rococo-Variations for viola and string ensemble) a violist. For Nemanja Radulović a personal approach when creating an album is essential. Bringing together Tchaikovsky’s two most important works for solo strings and orchestra is bringing together the two of the most relevant poles of his life –  Belgrade and Paris: The Rococo Variations are linked to the first part of his life, when he was a student in Belgrade before the Balkan war. At this time Nemanja not only used to playing the violin, but also the viola and sometimes the cello. Playing an arranged viola version of the Rococo variations which originally were composed for cello takes him back to his musical childhood in Belgrade. Yvan Cassar, who worked with Nemanja on Journey East has now produced compelling arrangements for strings and piano of the Rococo Variations. They provide a lightness and an energy that are perfectly suited for Tchaikovsky’s music. The Rococo Variations were recorded in Belgrade with ensemble Double Sens (French for: “double direction” & “double meaning”). The group reflects perfectly Nemanja’s dual past between Paris and Belgrade as it includes his former student-friends from Serbia, and his friends from the Conservatoire de Paris (including 2 members of the Fontanarosa family). The Tchaikovsky concerto is linked to Nemanja’s arrival in Paris. He began to work on the concerto with his Conservatoire de Paris’ teacher Patrice Fontanarosa. Since then, this piece has been the concerto Nemanja has played most often during his career, opening the doors to the great concert halls of the world like in Paris, London or Tokyo. The concerto was recorded in Istanbul with the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra and Sascha Goetzel, with which Nemanja feels he finds the freedom to develop and express what is fundamentally important to him in the respective work.
From
HI-RES€58.49
CD€41.99

Symphonies - Released June 16, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama - Gramophone Record of the Month - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
With Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducting, the Chamber Orchestra of Europe here presents Mendelssohn’s complete Symphonies (Nos. 1 to 5), composed between 1824 and 1842. Considered by some to be “the best chamber orchestra in the world” (BBC2 Television), the Chamber Orchestra of Europe was born three decades ago from the desire of several young musicians of the former European Union Youth Orchestra (EUYO) to pursue the adventure as an orchestra. After a few – unavoidable – changes within its ranks, this ensemble – currently – based in London retains the spirit that prevailed over its creation, shaped by complicity, generosity and liberty. Without a dedicated music director or conductor, the orchestra is now reunited with Yannick Nézet-Séguin, with whom there is, according to the latter, “a completely unique bond”. Their most recent releases, such as in Mozart’s operas, highlighted this shared complicity. And, after a complete collection on Schumann, it is only fair that the conductor and his musicians explore the effusive lyric, the “classical” side of German romanticism, by working on Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy’s five symphonies. But the aim however with these five symphonies is to explore widely differing universes: the very romantic Symphony No. 3, “the Scottish”, in which Wagner heard a “prime landscaper”; Symphony No. 4, “the Italian”, is almost a great symphonic poem, as illustrated (by?) numerous composers after 1834; Symphony No. 2, “Lobgesang”, ends on an immense cantata full of praise, which approach was inspired by Beethoven’s Ninth; Symphony No. 5 is strongly linked to Protestant religion, as its fugue finale cites one of the Lutheran chorales used, notably, by Johann Sebastian Bach: “Eine feste Burg ist unser Gott” (Our God is a secure fortress) (cf. Cantata BWV 80). © Qobuz, based on a Philarmonie de Paris leaflet for concerts in Paris, February 2016.
From
HI-RES€15.49€21.49(28%)
CD€10.99€14.99(27%)

Classical - Released March 10, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Although only 21 when this album appeared in early 2017, Polish-Canadian pianist Jan Lisiecki was no newcomer: he had already been on Deutsche Grammophon's roster since 2010 and released several recordings. The buzz surrounding Lisiecki, especially in Poland and its orbit, has been intense, and this recording will show the curious why. Lisiecki has yet to develop real power (and he's hampered by a rather distant NDR studio acoustic from DG), but the music on the program here, catching the moment when Chopin's distinctive style unfurled like a rare flower, fits his style uncannily well. These piano-and-orchestra works (and one posthumous piano nocturne) are not often performed. Probably the most popular piece is the Andante spianato and Grande Polonaise, Op. 22. Its solo piano introduction was composed after the fact and seems imperfectly joined to the polonaise, but Lisiecki's utterly arresting reading will make you forget all about that. Even better are the other piano-and-orchestra pieces, all of them normally counted as second-tier Chopin. Lisiecki doesn't just make a case for them; he calls the whole ranking into question. Sample the two movements of the the Rondo à la Krakowiak, Op. 14, with Lisiecki setting up subtle tension between the opening pentatonic material and the lively krakowiak, Chopin's only essay in this dance form. The Lisztian Fantasy on Polish Airs, Op. 13, is a flashier work and is not quite as successful, but the Variations on "Là ci darem la mano," Op. 2, have an unusual dramatic sense. This is an extremely promising release from a young specialist in Chopin and Mozart. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€15.49€21.49(28%)
CD€10.99€14.99(27%)

Classical - Released February 24, 2017 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
This group of Rachmaninov piano trios was released in celebration of the 70th birthday of Latvian violinist Gidon Kremer. One might have expected something that placed Kremer more in the spotlight than chamber music, and perhaps something devoted to the enormous influence he has had in reviving neglected Baltic and Eastern European repertory. On greater reflection, though, the decision is typical: Kremer has always been one who guides rather than one who takes the spotlight himself, and he has recorded a great deal of Russian music, often in fresh ways. So it is here with Rachmaninov. His two "trios élégiaques" are both youthful works; the Trio élégiaque No. 2 in D minor, Op. 9, was composed when he was 21, and the person being given the elegy was the late Tchaikovsky, whose own piano trio also had a set of variations for its central movement. The trios give priority not to the violin, but to the piano, and for chamber music partners Kremer chooses a mix of his own generation -- cellist Giedré Dirvanauskaité -- and the new one, Russian pianist Daniil Trifonov. It's an effective constellation overall, with Trifonov getting the virtuoso parts and the two older players putting in commentary. This isn't top-drawer Rachmaninov (the Trio No. 2 is a bit sprawling), but the group captures its mood of bravado and interiority. Another bonus is the rarely heard Preghiera, the slow movement of the Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, arranged for piano trio by none other than Fritz Kreisler. Sample this, for it introduces the fresh balances that are the distinctive feature of this recording. Deutsche Grammophon's sound, from the wooden and gentle Trifolion hall in Echternach, Luxembourg, is idiomatic to the music and exceptionally pleasant. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released September 2, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or / Arte - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Soprano Anna Netrebko is a major box-office draw on both sides of the Atlantic, but her catalog has been short on the aria-selections albums that remain the way most buyers listen to recorded opera. This collection of verismo ("realism") Italian arias goes a long way toward filling the hole. It's actually a bit out in front of her repertoire, which has focused on Verdi, and before that Mozart, but as her voice has darkened she has announced plans to add some of the roles represented here to her repertoire. From what's heard on the album, the prospects seem very good for a career phase that will elevate Netrebko's star even higher than it already is. You can sample the aria "In questa reggia" from Turandot to assure yourself of Netrebko's confidence in hitting the high notes, and hear one of several fine duet passages with the singer's tenor husband, Yusif Eyvazov. But also take time to explore the big hits, like "Un bel dì vedremo," from Madama Butterfly, where Netrebko seems to approach the music as if for the first time, and also some of the arias by some of the one-hit wonders of the verismo genre. With capable accompaniment from the Coro e orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia under Antonio Pappano, this is a major Netrebko release and a definitive verismo collection. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released January 8, 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Pianist Jan Lisiecki, just out of his teens when this recording was released, might have been expected to take a safe path with his recording of one of the most popular concertos in the repertory, the Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54. He has done anything but. This recording is unusual in several respects. It eschews the almost universal pairing with the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 16, in favor of a pair of late Schumann works that are rarely performed. But the real news here is the antiheroic and completely counter-to-type Schumann concerto itself. Lisiecki takes as a point of departure a waggish remark by Franz Liszt that the work is a "concerto without piano." The comment was surely a bit backhanded, but it gets to something essential about the piece that most performances do not focus on: in comparison with the common run of Romantic piano concertos, there is comparatively little solo piano work here and quite a few passages in which the piano swirls around within or even underneath the orchestra in basically accompanimental material. Lisiecki's contribution is to tone down the heroic passages and to explore the passagework in a great deal of detail. He's ably backed in this enterprise by the indefatigable Antonio Pappano and the Orchestra dell'Accademia di Santa Cecilia, and also by Deutsche Grammophon's engineers, who coax from the Auditorium Parco della Musica a wide-open sound that exposes Lisiecki's basically interior vision of the work. Another point in the recording's favor is the inclusion of the late Schumann pieces, especially the Introduction and Concert-Allegro, Op. 134, written in 1853 in the twilight of the composer's sanity. This work, never before recorded on Deutsche Grammophon in its 100-plus-year history, was traditionally regarded as part of Schumann's decline, and the booklet notes here reproduce that view. But the young Brahms played the work often, and it had more than a little influence on his first piano concerto. Lisiecki gives a riveting performance, and doesn't try to make it fit the pattern he has laid down with the Concerto in A minor. Should this be the only Schumann A minor in your collection? Probably not: it's quite unorthodox. Does it portend great things from its youthful pianist? Absolutely. © TiVo
From
CD€41.99

Classical - Released January 5, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
CD€55.99

Classical - Released December 2, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released February 9, 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
The subject matter of this collection of classic music from (mostly) Hollywood seems a major departure from violinist Daniel Hope's previous focus on music contending with the Nazi cultural orbit, but actually it's a logical step: a great deal of Hollywood film music was composed by refugees from Germany, and the stylistic world they created continues to resonate today. There are several good recordings of this repertory by young violinists, but Hope's stands out. Partly it's because Hope's big, richly sentimental sound fits this repertory well. Partly it's because he varies the program effectively with the full Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 35, of Erich Korngold, and an appearance by none other than Sting in Hanns Eisler's The Secret Marriage, while still finding the core that connects all these pieces. Partly it's that Hope finds some unusual things that connect with the rest of the program: a couple of German film scores from the early 1930s, and the German melody better known as As Time Goes By, from the film Casablanca. And partly it's the variety and sequence of arrangements running from Jascha Heifetz down to the present day. The result is a fine outing that will satisfy anyone in the mood for big film themes, but also those who are seriously interested in film music. © TiVo
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released September 15, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
While violinist Lisa Batiashvili has recorded mostly Romantic and modernist music, she has chosen to perform works by J.S. Bach for her third album on Deutsche Grammophon, signaling an expansion of a repertoire that is already quite varied. Even the selections on this 2014 release show a preference for a mix of pieces, with only the Violin Concerto in E major, the solo Violin Sonata in A minor, and the Sinfonia from the cantata Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe to showcase her talents as soloist. The rest of her program features her husband, oboist François Leleux, in the Double Concerto for violin and oboe in C minor, and the aria from the St. Matthew Passion, Erbarme dich, mein Gott, which he plays on oboe d'amore; and the Trio for flute, violin, and continuo in B minor by C.P.E. Bach, with flutist Emmanuel Pahud. Batiashvili generously shares the spotlight with these musicians, and their inclusion gives the whole CD an enjoyable feeling of conversation and flexibility of approach, which a straight run of violin concertos would have lacked. One drawback is the sound of the recording, which is echoic and a little indistinct, due to the resonant acoustics of the venues. Otherwise, this is a vibrant and appealing mainstream presentation of Bach that shows Batiashvili and her colleagues in a positive light. © TiVo
From
CD€19.49

Classical - Released May 5, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
Celebrating 25 years of musical partnership, violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter and pianist Lambert Orkis present a double-disc collection that demonstrates the duo's artistic aims, looking backward to past achievements and facing forward to new prospects. Featuring fresh performances of Massenet's Méditation and Ravel's Pièce en forme de Habanera, and offering world-premiere recordings of Penderecki's La Follia and Previn's Violin Sonata No. 2, this album provides sufficient evidence to show that Mutter and Orkis are as vital and dynamic as ever and that they aren't content to rest on their laurels. However, laurels are here in abundance, if one regards the reissues of older performances as high points of their career as chamber musicians. The recordings of violin sonatas by Beethoven, Brahms, Mozart, and Fauré are staples of Deutsche Grammophon's catalog, and as core works in the repertoire, they receive committed interpretations from Mutter and Orkis, while the shorter pieces by Kreisler, Brahms, and Debussy are attractive encores that give the program lighter moods. Considering the mix of old and new material, this package may attract longtime collectors, but it seems best suited as an introduction for newcomers. © TiVo
From
CD€14.99

Classical - Released September 15, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
While violinist Lisa Batiashvili has recorded mostly Romantic and modernist music, she has chosen to perform works by J.S. Bach for her third album on Deutsche Grammophon, signaling an expansion of a repertoire that is already quite varied. Even the selections on this 2014 release show a preference for a mix of pieces, with only the Violin Concerto in E major, the solo Violin Sonata in A minor, and the Sinfonia from the cantata Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe to showcase her talents as soloist. The rest of her program features her husband, oboist François Leleux, in the Double Concerto for violin and oboe in C minor, and the aria from the St. Matthew Passion, Erbarme dich, mein Gott, which he plays on oboe d'amore; and the Trio for flute, violin, and continuo in B minor by C.P.E. Bach, with flutist Emmanuel Pahud. Batiashvili generously shares the spotlight with these musicians, and their inclusion gives the whole CD an enjoyable feeling of conversation and flexibility of approach, which a straight run of violin concertos would have lacked. One drawback is the sound of the recording, which is echoic and a little indistinct, due to the resonant acoustics of the venues. Otherwise, this is a vibrant and appealing mainstream presentation of Bach that shows Batiashvili and her colleagues in a positive light. © TiVo
From
CD€38.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released May 6, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
In celebration of Richard Strauss' 150th anniversary, baritone Thomas Hampson and pianist Wolfram Rieger present a recital of 18 songs that represent an output of more than 200, written throughout this composer's long career. Strauss achieved his greatest fame from his operas Salome, Elektra, and Der Rosenkavalier, and orchestral tone poems, such as Don Juan, Ein Heldenleben, Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche, and Also Sprach Zarathustra. But his vocal music has been respected rather more than widely known, and somewhat less performed than the comparable art songs of his contemporaries, Gustav Mahler and Hugo Wolf. It could be said that Hampson performs a great service by bringing attention to this overlooked body of work, but if all things were equal, his CD should be appreciated for its varied expressions and artistic depth, and not just because it reawakens interest in Strauss' neglected songs. Once past the feeling that this is unknown music, many listeners will begin to feel a familiarity with Strauss' material, and recognize that many of his poets -- Heine, Rückert, Dehmel, and others -- were favored by other great composers. Furthermore, Strauss' extraordinary gift for expressive melodies and rich harmonies make these songs as satisfying and compelling as any lieder from the 19th century. However, it must be said that Hampson's deeply felt interpretations and Rieger's sympathetic accompaniment make this music especially communicative and memorable, and Deutsche Grammophon's exceptional recording gives both musicians an ideal platform to start a revival. Highly recommended. © TiVo
From
CD€38.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
CD€38.99

Classical - Released March 17, 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
From
HI-RES€21.49
CD€14.99

Classical - Released October 21, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Daniil Trifonov's 2013 recital at Carnegie Hall is a clear demonstration of what this pianist does well, in works well-suited to his talents. Trifonov has a reputation for his dazzling technique, which he has shown to best advantage in performances of Romantic repertoire, and his live readings of Alexander Scriabin's Piano Sonata No. 2 in G sharp minor, "Sonata-Fantasy," Franz Liszt's Piano Sonata in B minor, and Frédèric Chopin's 24 Preludes, Op. 28, offer a well-rounded impression of his extraordinary abilities. The Scriabin opener gives Trifonov an opportunity to display his amazingly quick prestidigitation in the second movement, and several of Chopin's preludes are whipped off with a velocity that impresses, even while being unnecessarily showy. But Trifonov has a much greater depth than his fireworks suggest, and his Scriabin and Chopin have moments of lucid reflection that reveal Trifonov's thoughtful, expressive side. Yet he seems most at home in Liszt's monumental sonata, with its brooding passages, wistful reveries, and dynamic surges that reveal the volatile and poetic temperaments to which he feels most attuned. Trifonov is decidedly a virtuoso in the Lisztian mold, so it would behoove him to make his next recital album an all-Liszt program, though this exceptional performance of the Sonata in B minor will have to satisfy his fans until then. © TiVo

Label

Deutsche Grammophon (DG) in the magazine