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Film Soundtracks - Released August 13, 2021 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2004 | Varese Sarabande

Sometimes, Christmas songs do more than conjure up images of blatant commercialism and forced family congeniality. Even the blackest heart cannot deny the healing power of hearing Judy Garland sing the winsomely nostalgic "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" or the joyful bounce of Chet Atkins' guitar on "Jingle Bell Rock." It's nice that these and three other holiday classics occur at the very beginning of Surviving Christmas, because any listener willing to wade through the crap that follows is indeed a fetishist. Somewhere between a terrible remix of Bing Crosby singing "Happy Holidays" -- simply laying down a hip-hop beat and playing with vocal effects is neat if you're 14 -- and a truly forgettable score from the usually reliable Randy Edelman, the not-so-ironically titled Surviving Christmas becomes an Olympic event in endurance. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1996 | Geffen*

Dragonheart remains Randy Edelman's most memorable and fully realized film score, achieving a unique fusion of epic fantasy and light comedy that fully emphasizes the composer's strengths. Edelman's main theme, "World of the Heart," will be instantly familiar to anyone who's seen a movie trailer in the last decade of so -- a soaring melody that's equal parts grandeur and adventure, it's been recycled umpteen times over by films with none of the sword-and-sorcery elements of Dragonheart, but its all-purpose romanticism is undeniably potent. Between the widescreen themes that bookend the score, however, Edelman returns to the intimate character-driven themes that are his bread and butter, capturing an energy and whimsy that perfectly complement the onscreen action. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1996 | Varese Sarabande

It sometimes seems Randy Edelman would score a film for nothing more than a sack of peanuts and a pat on the head -- who else would agree to collaborate with Jean-Claude Van Damme on the martial-arts lunkhead's directorial debut, the kickboxing opus The Quest? What, Edelman didn't have his neighbors' home movies to score instead? Anyway, The Quest is pretty much what you'd expect -- an energetic but unchallenging action entry with elements of Far Eastern influences, its combination of strings, brass and electronics sounds pretty much exactly like every other score the composer's ever written, most closely recalling the earlier Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story. Yawn. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1996 | Universal Music

Randy Edelman composed and conducted the soundtrack in 1996 for the Sylvester Stallone vehicle Daylight. Being an action drama, the songs are fitting, full of suspenseful music meant to drive the audience wild while it sits in the background of the movie. Edelman probably succeeded decently in this respect, as the music is fitting for the movie. The problem is that without the movie, all of the songs sound somewhat similar, and not one of the songs particularly stands out as any sort of crowning accomplishment. As usual, Edelman's sound begins to sound a bit like John Williams' work. After 14 tracks of ambient background drama music, there is a soft duet by Bruce Roberts and former disco diva Donna Summer, which was presumably used for ending credits fodder. Finally, unknown group Ho-hum appears with a bit of soft alt-rock à la Fastball. Overall, the music is perfect for the purpose it was composed for, though a full album of ambient instrumental dramatic runs is perhaps not needed. © Adam Greenberg /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1992 | Varese Sarabande

After proving himself a composer of genuine substance earlier in 1992 with The Last of the Mohicans, Randy Edelman backslides with The Distinguished Gentleman, an utterly undistinguished light comedy score even frothier and more forgettable than his average fare. Apart from the Caribbean-inspired title theme and the jazz-influenced "You, Me and a Martini," the melodies and arrangements are virtually interchangeable. Easy on the ears, effervescent, and thoroughly vanilla, the music holds almost no value when separated from the onscreen narrative it accompanies. Edelman has proven himself a compelling talent in the past. Why he consistently wastes his time and ours with this kind of tripe is a mystery. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 16, 2000 | Milan Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1997 | Varese Sarabande

For better or worse, composer Randy Edelman is the king of the family-friendly film score. His lighthearted and lightweight approach emphasizes traditional virtues like heart-tugging string arrangements and fanciful piano melodies, perfectly complementing paint-by-numbers popcorn fare like Kindergarten Cop and Beethoven. Edelman's work on the 1997 feature film remake of the vintage television sitcom Leave It to Beaver ranks among his best, in part because of his wise decision to adapt the series' classic theme, as evocative a paean to idyllic family life as any ever written. Edelman's own original themes boast an unusual playfulness well suited to the film's suburban whimsy. It's by no means a groundbreaking score, but as pure froth goes, it's undeniably appealing. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 12, 2010 | Varese Sarabande

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2008 | Varese Sarabande

Given that Randy Edelman's reputation as a Hollywood composer rests on his work on romantic comedies and family-friendly fare, he's an unlikely choice to score an effects-driven, popcorn adventure like The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, but while his signature playfulness and sentimentality occasionally bubble to the surface, this is nevertheless a solid, often exciting effort that manages to fulfill the mandates of the genre in question. The film's Chinese setting allows Edelman the freedom to return to the Eastern influences of past scores like Shanghai Knights and Dragon, juxtaposing traditional instrumentation against bold strings, electric guitar, and soaring electronics. While the action themes are a bit over the top in their sheer relentlessness, Edelman balances the onslaught with a clutch of lighter, more romantic cues (most notably "Love in the Himalayas" and "A Warm Rooftop") that play to his core strengths. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1992 | Geffen

For better or worse, composer Randy Edelman is the king of the family-friendly film score. His lighthearted and lightweight approach emphasizes traditional virtues like heart-tugging string arrangements and fanciful piano melodies, and while it's undoubtedly pap, it's created with genuine care and craftsmanship. Beethoven is perhaps the quintessential Edelman soundtrack. Easy on the ears, effervescent, and utterly forgettable, it typifies the forced frivolity that is Hollywood's stock-in-trade. Though the film has nothing to do with Beethoven himself -- the title refers to a large, slobbering St. Bernard, not the famed composer -- Edelman still takes it upon himself to employ strings and other classical elements in an apparent effort to lend the film some much-needed dignity and substance; it doesn't quite work, but hey, at least he tried. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 20, 2015 | Back Lot Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released February 14, 2006 | Varese Sarabande

Regardless of the moral imperatives etched upon the stone tablets Moses brought down from Mount Sinai, right-thinking soundtrack enthusiasts have long followed one primary directive: thou shalt not listen to Randy Edelman. The composer's score for the 2006 television remake of The Ten Commandments is his usual slick, soulless fare. Its anthemic synthesizer melodies and pounding rhythms contrast sharply with the project's Old Testament setting, although it's entirely possible this is precisely the kind of music Rameses programmed into his iPod. Edelman does capture the kind of grandiose sweep one expects from Biblical epics, but the relentless bombast is as exhausting as a browbeating from a Sunday School teacher. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1995 | Varese

Randy Edelman's score to the 1995 romantic comedy While You Were Sleeping is as bland and inoffensive as the film itself. With its sweetly syrupy strings, gentle woodwinds, and expressive piano, the music is interchangeable with dozens of other contemporary rom-com scores. It's by no means unpleasant listening, but there's nothing remotely memorable about it, either. And to be fair to Edelman, the film doesn't give him much to work with. Given the right project (e.g., The Last of the Mohicans or Shanghai Noon), he can prove a formidable talent, but too often he wastes his time and energy on this kind of tripe. © Jason Ankeny /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1995 | Varese Sarabande

It's an unfortunate fact of life in the soundtrack album business that the American Federation of Musicians imposes such heavy re-use fees on orchestral material recorded for movies or television that many soundtrack albums are brief affairs. This is why Citizen X runs a few seconds under 30 minutes; it's a good 30 minutes, however. Edelman's score for this HBO movie (about a Russian serial killer and the policeman who worked the case) manages to suggest suspense and despair throughout the majority of the ten cues, working in Russian themes and textures wherever possible. Edelman relies more on sustained chords from the strings than on gratuitous stingers, deep rumbling tones and high squeaky violin attacks. © Steven McDonald /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released May 10, 2019 | Back Lot Music

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Film Soundtracks - Released May 4, 2009 | Sony Classical

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2007 | Hollywood Records

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Pop - Released January 1, 1984 | Cherry Red Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 1, 2008 | Varese Sarabande

Randy Edelman's score for 27 Dresses relies on a light touch and playful melodies, which is understandable for a romantic comedy. However, the tradeoff for these elements is a lack of depth; the songs are sweet, but also too short to develop beyond a fleeting hint of emotion. True, film scores are meant to enhance rather than overwhelm a scene, but nothing on 27 Dresses sticks out as a theme or a memorable moment -- there's nothing sweeping, plaintive, poignant, or jubilant, which seems odd, given the film's plot. (Even the melancholy tunes aren't particularly moving.) 27 Dresses may be a nice reminder or souvenir for fans of the film, but it could prove too insubstantial for casual consumption. © Katherine Fulton /TiVo