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Classical - Released September 30, 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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To mark his debut on Deutsche Grammophon with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Yannick Nézet-Séguin pays tribute to his legendary predecessor on the podium, Leopold Stokowski. The transcriptions of Bach's organ music are among Stokowski's most celebrated achievements, and none is more famous than his expansive arrangement of the Toccata and Fugue in D minor, which was prominently featured in Walt Disney's Fantasia. It's a classic showpiece for the orchestra, as are Stokowski's fulsome orchestrations of the "Little" Fugue in G minor, and the Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. Somewhat less obvious is the choice of Igor Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps, though Stokowski gave the work its American premiere and recorded it for RCA Victor in 1929 with the Philadelphia Orchestra, so its place on this program is justified. Not that Nézet-Séguin would present a slavish imitation of Stokowski's interpretation, because modern standards of performance are so much higher than when the work was still a novelty, and the Philadelphia Orchestra today is far more skilled in playing this piece. Nézet-Séguin's reading is much faster and sharper than Stokowski's, and the digital reproduction is far superior for depth, tone colors, and details. Indeed, this is one of the finest modern performances of Le Sacre on CD, and fans of the piece will find much to get excited about. To round out the disc, a performance of Stravinsky's Pastorale is offered as an encore. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 1, 2013 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
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Classical - Released January 1, 2000 | Naxos Classical Archives

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 29, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The crushing failure of Rachmaninov's Symphony No. 1 at its premiere on 15 March 1897 plunged its young author into a deep depression from which he would later issue Concerto No. 2, composed in compensation for this disaster and under the influence of a medical treatment based on hypnosis. This first Symphony was ambitious. The young artist wanted to express so many feelings that the score bulged, opaque in terms of its form and profuse by the admission of the writer, who would go on to denigrate it later. This cursed score would never be played again during the composer's lifetime and the manuscript remains lost. It was reconstructed, probably with the help of orchestral parts, and recreated in Moscow in 1945. Captured in concert in 2018, here it is adorned with a thousand and one colours from the Philadelphia Orchestra under the charged, powerful and imaginative direction of Yannick Nézet-Seguin who believes in this work and conducts it as a masterpiece and not in any sense for the purpose of rehabilitation. Under such an inspired baton, this youthful opus 13 can happily be presented next to Rachmaninov's final score for orchestra, one of the most successful: the famous Symphonic Dances that are a metaphor for the three ages of man. Rachmaninov's obsession with bells and the Catholic theme of the Dies Irae is well known, both of which he sets to music in virtually all of his works; it is already the case in Symphony No. 1 and it will be the case again in the masterful Symphonic Dances performed here by the orchestra for which they were written in 1940, three years before the composer's death in California, where he had gone into exile. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 24, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Jazz - Released May 21, 2021 | Blue Engine Records

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Classical - Released July 16, 2021 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1982 | Warner Classics

Classical - Released January 1, 1961 | BnF Collection

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Classical - Released November 22, 2010 | Warner Classics

Classical - Released October 28, 2013 | BnF Collection

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Classical - Released January 29, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The crushing failure of Rachmaninov's Symphony No. 1 at its premiere on 15 March 1897 plunged its young author into a deep depression from which he would later issue Concerto No. 2, composed in compensation for this disaster and under the influence of a medical treatment based on hypnosis. This first Symphony was ambitious. The young artist wanted to express so many feelings that the score bulged, opaque in terms of its form and profuse by the admission of the writer, who would go on to denigrate it later. This cursed score would never be played again during the composer's lifetime and the manuscript remains lost. It was reconstructed, probably with the help of orchestral parts, and recreated in Moscow in 1945. Captured in concert in 2018, here it is adorned with a thousand and one colours from the Philadelphia Orchestra under the charged, powerful and imaginative direction of Yannick Nézet-Seguin who believes in this work and conducts it as a masterpiece and not in any sense for the purpose of rehabilitation. Under such an inspired baton, this youthful opus 13 can happily be presented next to Rachmaninov's final score for orchestra, one of the most successful: the famous Symphonic Dances that are a metaphor for the three ages of man. Rachmaninov's obsession with bells and the Catholic theme of the Dies Irae is well known, both of which he sets to music in virtually all of his works; it is already the case in Symphony No. 1 and it will be the case again in the masterful Symphonic Dances performed here by the orchestra for which they were written in 1940, three years before the composer's death in California, where he had gone into exile. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 1979 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released April 21, 1995 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | The Philadelphia Orchestra

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Classical - Released January 11, 2010 | The Philadelphia Orchestra

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Classical - Released March 17, 1998 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Christian Thielemann is a self-professed admirer of Wilhelm Furtwängler, and the older conductor's influence is perhaps most readily identified in these 1997 performances of the music of Richard Wagner, particularly in the fluid phrasing, elastic tempos, and swelling dynamics. One may well feel transported to Furtwängler's era, when such liberties of interpretation were common, and Wagner's music regularly received unabashedly Romantic and highly personalized treatments from German maestros. Some might consider Thielemann's rubato and drawn-out tempos to be self-indulgent and even manipulative, and he certainly takes advantage of every expressive possibility in these selections from Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, Lohengrin, Parsifal, and Tristan und Isolde. Then again, Thielemann's ardent fans will overlook the supposed excesses and instead revel in the passionate playing and gorgeous sonorities that the Philadelphia Orchestra produces under his direction, and especially relish the expansive readings of the Prelude to Act I of Lohengrin, the Prelude and the Good Friday Music from Parsifal, and the Prelude and Liebestod from Tristan, which have always provided excellent opportunities for emoting. Deutsche Grammophon's reproduction is spectacular, with full orchestral colors and spacious dimensions. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 2, 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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