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Classical - Released February 23, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released January 1, 1967 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Symphonic Music - Released October 13, 2017 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
This live recording is being billed as a kind of youth-in-old-age romp from the 76-year-old Martha Argerich and the 82-year-old Seiji Ozawa. And so it is. In the Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major of Beethoven, Op. 15, Argerich, despite talk that she is slowing down, is fully her playful self, and a bit of sampling anywhere that soloist and orchestra are both active should convince you of the joy that comes from hearing a soloist and conductor who have done this often enough to have a sixth sense of what's coming from the other, and to act on that knowledge on the fly. This is an unusually strong performance of this concerto, actually Beethoven's second, that catches its brashness and its sense of breaking the mold at every turn. But there's an even better aspect to the album: it's one of just a few documents recording the collaboration between Ozawa and Japan's Mito Chamber Orchestra, an organization he helped found, for which he recruited the musicians, and which he has continued to conduct even as his high-flying international career has continued. The group does not have the pristine sound one may associate with Japanese groups, and that may be all to the good: it is brisk, fresh, and, in Ozawa's hands, a bit brusque. It also has a fabulous sense of ensemble in the Beethoven Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, which you may find even more compelling than the concerto: the tension in the opening movement from the very first unexpected subdominant harmony reflects the implications of that opening better than other recordings out there. A real find, and a little landmark in Japanese music-making. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 23, 1995 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released March 2, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Even after playing it in concert together the previous summer, Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky still spent five days in Berlin recording Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor. They spent a Saturday in late February 2003 tuning up and the next four days recording, one day for each movement. On top of that, they practiced every morning back in their hotels. And this is Martha Argerich, Gidon Kremer, Yuri Bashmet, and Mischa Maisky here: not only arguably the four greatest living virtuosos on their instruments, but friends who've been playing chamber music together for decades. How could they have spent six hours recording the opening Allegro? How could they have spent any less? Considering that Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky are also four of the most highly individualistic and idiosyncratic performers in the history of classical music, they probably took five-and-three-quarter hours just working the kinks out. But the results are absolutely worth it: despite all their arduous work, Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky play with unrelenting recklessness, taking musical, dramatic, and -- most of all -- emotional chances few other performers would dare take. Rhythms, tempos, dynamics, phrasing, form, and every note are all infused with their individual and collective technical and interpretive virtuosity. While their performance may be too exciting to listen to every day, it is nevertheless one of the two or three greatest performances of Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor ever recorded. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is right there in the room with you. © TiVo
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Classical - Released March 2, 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Even after playing it in concert together the previous summer, Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky still spent five days in Berlin recording Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor. They spent a Saturday in late February 2003 tuning up and the next four days recording, one day for each movement. On top of that, they practiced every morning back in their hotels. And this is Martha Argerich, Gidon Kremer, Yuri Bashmet, and Mischa Maisky here: not only arguably the four greatest living virtuosos on their instruments, but friends who've been playing chamber music together for decades. How could they have spent six hours recording the opening Allegro? How could they have spent any less? Considering that Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky are also four of the most highly individualistic and idiosyncratic performers in the history of classical music, they probably took five-and-three-quarter hours just working the kinks out. But the results are absolutely worth it: despite all their arduous work, Argerich, Kremer, Bashmet, and Maisky play with unrelenting recklessness, taking musical, dramatic, and -- most of all -- emotional chances few other performers would dare take. Rhythms, tempos, dynamics, phrasing, form, and every note are all infused with their individual and collective technical and interpretive virtuosity. While their performance may be too exciting to listen to every day, it is nevertheless one of the two or three greatest performances of Brahms' Piano Quartet in G minor ever recorded. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is right there in the room with you. © TiVo
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Classical - Released December 4, 2020 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
Beethoven's Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 ("Pastoral"), was transcribed several times; the version played here is by 19th century composer Selmar Bagge, and doubtless, many people heard the work for the first time through this medium. The seemingly indestructible Martha Argerich takes the lead part here, and the results are marvelous. Martha Argerich plays the "Pastoral" Symphony! A gift for the Argerich fan who has everything. Bagge's version takes steps to make the work pianistic, and Argerich steps up to the challenge; right from the entrancing opening measures of the first movement, the reading has the well-sculpted quality of a great symphonic performance. The second part is played by pianist Theodosia Ntokou, a protégée of Argerich's, and for many listeners, the big news here will be that the performance of the Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31, No. 2 ("Tempest"), is not by Argerich but by Ntokou, who emerges as influenced by Argerich but not a clone. She offers a fine, distinctive "Tempest" that dials back the drama in the outer movements and places the slow movement front and center in a fantasy-like treatment. It's an unorthodox reading that's fully thought out, and it adds to the evidence that Argerich may have found her successor. An entirely absorbing and delightful recording. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 8, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released March 13, 2000 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet

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Martha Argerich in the magazine