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Rock - Released June 1, 1985 | Noise Records

Kreator would eventually become one of the dominant European thrash outfits of the late '80s, but their 1985 debut, Endless Pain, wasn't much more than a musical starting point from which the band sorely needed to grow. Promising moments during numbers like "Total Death," "Storm of the Beast," and "Living in Fear" hint at the group's eventual development into hard music pioneers. Putting all the pieces together into a single cohesive track -- much less a full-length record -- was a skill the German act had yet to acquire. This release is hardly an embarrassment, and it should satisfy any fan of the group looking to complete his or her collection, but new listeners searching for Kreator's best '80s material are encouraged to check out the follow-up, Pleasure to Kill, or the exquisite Terrible Certainty before considering Endless Pain. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | Noise Records

Metal band Kreator had been around for awhile before they released Pleasure to Kill in 1986. Many in the underground metal scene were already paying special attention to the German outfit's proto-death sound, but the cult status was shed after this critically and commercially successful sophomore effort hit record-store shelves. As fierce and unyielding as the group's debut, Endless Pain, was, Pleasure to Kill provides double the sonic carnage and superior material. Standout tracks include the syncopated "Riot of Violence" and the sprawling closer "Awakening of the Gods." Pleasure to Kill might not be the best recording from Kreator, but in many ways, it could be the most significant. Fans of the group simply must own this seminal European metal offering. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | Noise Records

Metal band Kreator had been around for awhile before they released Pleasure to Kill in 1986. Many in the underground metal scene were already paying special attention to the German outfit's proto-death sound, but the cult status was shed after this critically and commercially successful sophomore effort hit record-store shelves. As fierce and unyielding as the group's debut, Endless Pain, was, Pleasure to Kill provides double the sonic carnage and superior material. Standout tracks include the syncopated "Riot of Violence" and the sprawling closer "Awakening of the Gods." Pleasure to Kill might not be the best recording from Kreator, but in many ways, it could be the most significant. Fans of the group simply must own this seminal European metal offering. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 22, 1987 | Sanctuary Records

Kreator dialed in their modern thrash on Terrible Certainty, the group's third full-length offering. One of the most highly anticipated European metal records of the decade, this 1987 release proves that the previous year's hit, Pleasure to Kill, wasn't a fluke, and that Kreator was capable of delivering under pressure. The German outfit cranks up the technical difficulty on Terrible Certainty, executing the tightest performances of their career while maneuvering around some extremely difficult, yet memorable riffs. The guitar flurries of the title track and "Behind the Mirror" hold their own against the best work from Metallica or any other American thrash behemoths. Some might argue that the stateside metal heads even took some cues from Terrible Certainty. It is certain that Kreator's influence isn't limited to stateside artists, as modern European metal has never been the same since the group unleashed a slew of powerful late-'80s discs, Terrible Certainty arguably being the best of the lot. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 22, 1987 | Noise Records

Kreator dialed in their modern thrash on Terrible Certainty, the group's third full-length offering. One of the most highly anticipated European metal records of the decade, this 1987 release proves that the previous year's hit, Pleasure to Kill, wasn't a fluke, and that Kreator was capable of delivering under pressure. The German outfit cranks up the technical difficulty on Terrible Certainty, executing the tightest performances of their career while maneuvering around some extremely difficult, yet memorable riffs. The guitar flurries of the title track and "Behind the Mirror" hold their own against the best work from Metallica or any other American thrash behemoths. Some might argue that the stateside metal heads even took some cues from Terrible Certainty. It is certain that Kreator's influence isn't limited to stateside artists, as modern European metal has never been the same since the group unleashed a slew of powerful late-'80s discs, Terrible Certainty arguably being the best of the lot. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1988 | Noise Records

German thrash metal heroes Kreator spent much of 1988 either touring or writing material for their pivotal fourth album, Extreme Aggression, which was to be the first released by Noise Records (in conjunction with a major record company in America, Epic Records). But not wishing to keep fans waiting too long while they toiled, Kreator decided to issue the Out of the Dark, Into the Light EP as a stopgap just in case. Almost qualifying as a mini-album, the five-track Out of the Dark is kicked off by the snappy, but rather forgettable "Impossible to Cure," offers a raucous rendition of Raven's "Lambs to the Slaughter," and then rolls through three competent live versions of "Terrible Certainty" and two lesser-known cuts. Honestly, nothing here will prove terribly exciting for casual fans, but it's definitely worthwhile for Kreator fanatics. [Late '90s reissues of the Terrible Certainty album feature this EP as bonus material.] © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 19, 1989 | Noise Records

On Extreme Aggression, a successful Kreator close the '80s by delivering their final thrash triumph. With the most hallowed Kreator lineup (Mille Petrozza on vocals and guitar, Jörg "Tritze" Trzebiatowski on guitar, Jürgen "Ventor" Reil on drums, and bassist Rob Fioretti) joining forces once again to follow up the spectacular Terrible Certainty, Kreator sound determined to continue their thrash mastery on Extreme Aggression. The results are fierce and noisy on this 1989 Epic release -- the first major-label effort for the band. Petrozza and Fioretti's guitar work is as punchy as ever, and Reil's massive drums are unrelenting and continually improving. While the anonymous production has a slightly negative effect on Extreme Aggression, when compared to more commercially successful major-label thrash artists like Metallica, Kreator use their underground experience to fight through and present a unique package stuffed with hearty riffs and performances. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Metal - Released June 19, 1989 | Noise Records

On Extreme Aggression, a successful Kreator close the '80s by delivering their final thrash triumph. With the most hallowed Kreator lineup (Mille Petrozza on vocals and guitar, Jörg "Tritze" Trzebiatowski on guitar, Jürgen "Ventor" Reil on drums, and bassist Rob Fioretti) joining forces once again to follow up the spectacular Terrible Certainty, Kreator sound determined to continue their thrash mastery on Extreme Aggression. The results are fierce and noisy on this 1989 Epic release -- the first major-label effort for the band. Petrozza and Fioretti's guitar work is as punchy as ever, and Reil's massive drums are unrelenting and continually improving. While the anonymous production has a slightly negative effect on Extreme Aggression, when compared to more commercially successful major-label thrash artists like Metallica, Kreator use their underground experience to fight through and present a unique package stuffed with hearty riffs and performances. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released November 6, 1990 | Noise Records

Although they remained largely without peer when it came to pure Germanic thrash metal, by the time of 1990's Coma of Souls, Kreator's very successful formula had begun to grow a little tired. The fact that they were coming off perhaps their biggest album yet in 1989's Extreme Aggression didn't help matters, and despite its overwhelmingly solid songwriting, Coma of Souls still sounded somewhat repetitive to all but the most unquestioning of fans. Still, better too much of a good thing than nothing at all, and with their head-spinning musicianship and well-chosen stabs at melody, complex moshers like "When the Sun Burns Red," "Angels of Brutality," and the title song are guaranteed to thrill lovers of technically proficient thrash. Two tracks in particular stand out of the pack, namely the outstanding "People of the Lie," whose chorus is almost too groovy and memorable to be called thrash metal, and the expertly executed "Terror Zone," with its unnaturally measured pace and a melodic intro to die for. Also of note, the band hardly skips a beat with the arrival of former Sodom guitarist Frank "Blackfire" Gosdzik, who establishes an instant chemistry with vocalist and fellow six-stringer Mille Petrozza from the start, as they proceed to exchange lead after stinging lead like machine-gun fire. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Metal - Released November 6, 1990 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 26, 1992 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released August 1, 1995 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released July 22, 1997 | Noise Records

The unexpected arrival of former Coroner six-string genius Tommy Vetterli into the Kreator fold, there to spar with founding mastermind and resident blazing thrash guitar specialist Mille Petrozza, seemed like one of the oddest stylistic pairings in metal history. Needless to say, observers expected one of two options: absolute fireworks, or a complete and utter failure to communicate. Ironically, they didn't really get either one, for not only was 1997's Outcast conspicuously scarce on virtuoso guitar solos, but it also stuck with recent Kreator history in exploring sonic territories far beyond the legendary German group's once dependably strict diet of pure thrash metal. In fact, though it thankfully coalesced the chaotic ideas scattered all over 1995's Cause for Conflict into a more cohesive whole, the album resurrected some of the industrial elements first heard on 1992's Renewal with questionable results, and focused predominantly on mid-paced arrangements that hardly approached the hyper speed of yore. As a result, despite offering some quality songwriting via first-half highlights like "Leave This World Behind," the pounding "Phobia," and the claustrophobically slow "Black Sunrise," the bulk of Outcast is barely recognizable as a Kreator LP. And even if approached as a brand new entity, the material (particularly second half yawn-fests such as the title track) is nowhere near groundbreaking either, never mind -- God forbid -- exciting. In short, whatever artistic headway purportedly made here was rendered null and void by the commercial rejection that met its release, although Kreator would take one final stab at this direction before reverting to the band's trusty old ways. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 22, 1997 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released September 25, 2001 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released January 10, 2005 | Nuclear Blast

Metal - Released November 24, 2006 | Gun

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Rock - Released January 13, 2009 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released February 16, 2009 | Noise Records

Kreator would eventually become one of the dominant European thrash outfits of the late '80s, but their 1985 debut, Endless Pain, wasn't much more than a musical starting point from which the band sorely needed to grow. Promising moments during numbers like "Total Death," "Storm of the Beast," and "Living in Fear" hint at the group's eventual development into hard music pioneers. Putting all the pieces together into a single cohesive track -- much less a full-length record -- was a skill the German act had yet to acquire. This release is hardly an embarrassment, and it should satisfy any fan of the group looking to complete his or her collection, but new listeners searching for Kreator's best '80s material are encouraged to check out the follow-up, Pleasure to Kill, or the exquisite Terrible Certainty before considering Endless Pain. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 9, 2012 | Sanctuary Records

Of all the underground European thrash outfits who helped pioneer death metal during the '80s -- bands like Hellhammer, Sodom, Destruction, and Bathory -- Kreator arguably holds up the best over time (with the possible exception of Celtic Frost). Where many of their peers made an impression solely through manic intensity, Kreator became increasingly able to bolster their harsh fury with progressive compositions and tight, technically accomplished musicianship. The band's most influential period, 1985-1992, is captured on Past Life Trauma, a fan-selected, 18-track best-of that features two rarities and two previously unreleased tracks. Featuring most of Kreator's best material from the '80s and early '90s, it's the perfect introduction to the influential thrashers' output, and it's been digitally remastered to boot. © Steve Huey /TiVo