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Rock - Released January 27, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | Noise Records

Metal band Kreator had been around for awhile before they released Pleasure to Kill in 1986. Many in the underground metal scene were already paying special attention to the German outfit's proto-death sound, but the cult status was shed after this critically and commercially successful sophomore effort hit record-store shelves. As fierce and unyielding as the group's debut, Endless Pain, was, Pleasure to Kill provides double the sonic carnage and superior material. Standout tracks include the syncopated "Riot of Violence" and the sprawling closer "Awakening of the Gods." Pleasure to Kill might not be the best recording from Kreator, but in many ways, it could be the most significant. Fans of the group simply must own this seminal European metal offering. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 1, 2012 | Nuclear Blast

Booklet
The 13th studio album of Kreator's enviable 30-year career, 2012's Phantom Antichrist is also the fourth long-player released since the group's triumphant rebirth to thrash in 2001 -- a move that coincided almost perfectly with a worldwide genre revival driven by both veteran and rookie ensembles and that, as a result, saw these German survivors enjoying a long-deferred coronation for their almost unrivaled achievements. Now that trend -- like all trends -- has come and gone, and yet Kreator persist: still displaying, as the new material contained here bears repeated witness, 100 percent commitment to the original, metal-thrashing mad raison d'être that launched them in the first place. Filled with fire and fury, indefatigable energy, and truly incensed lyrical bile for men of such middle-aged ripeness -- led as always by guiding light Mille Petrozza -- the opening title track and "Civilization Collapse" dispense a moshing master class, showing the young ones how it's done, and how it'll continue to be done as weaker, less driven bands young and old inevitably fall by the wayside. Acoustic guitar-augmented cuts like "United in Hate" and "The Few, the Proud, the Broken" prove equally devastating before they're though, and just when more commercially inclined musical considerations appear to threaten thrash's supremacy, like, say, during the highly melodic parts of "From Flood into Fire," "Victory Will Come," and "Until Our Paths Cross Again," one can rest assured that a pedal-to-the-metal onslaught lies just around the corner. To wit, both the slower, mildly Arabian-psychedelic bridge of "Death to the World" and the contemplative mood-meets-murmured vocals of "Your Heaven, My Hell" weigh in, passing at Kreator's hit-and-miss experiments of the 1990s before returning to the prevailing mosh-fest, and within that context there really can be no hard feelings -- what's past is past. The irony of which should be lost on neither fans nor the bandmembers themselves, since embracing the past clearly paved the way toward Kreator's future by affording them this second lease on life and career. Judging by the evidence available on Phantom Antichrist, it's not over yet. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 27, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released February 14, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released November 6, 1990 | Noise Records

Although they remained largely without peer when it came to pure Germanic thrash metal, by the time of 1990's Coma of Souls, Kreator's very successful formula had begun to grow a little tired. The fact that they were coming off perhaps their biggest album yet in 1989's Extreme Aggression didn't help matters, and despite its overwhelmingly solid songwriting, Coma of Souls still sounded somewhat repetitive to all but the most unquestioning of fans. Still, better too much of a good thing than nothing at all, and with their head-spinning musicianship and well-chosen stabs at melody, complex moshers like "When the Sun Burns Red," "Angels of Brutality," and the title song are guaranteed to thrill lovers of technically proficient thrash. Two tracks in particular stand out of the pack, namely the outstanding "People of the Lie," whose chorus is almost too groovy and memorable to be called thrash metal, and the expertly executed "Terror Zone," with its unnaturally measured pace and a melodic intro to die for. Also of note, the band hardly skips a beat with the arrival of former Sodom guitarist Frank "Blackfire" Gosdzik, who establishes an instant chemistry with vocalist and fellow six-stringer Mille Petrozza from the start, as they proceed to exchange lead after stinging lead like machine-gun fire. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Drakkar Entertainment

Not content with his Kreator's already-established reputation as perhaps Germany's top thrash metal band of the 1980s, group mastermind Mille Petrozza spent much of the 1990s attempting to reinvent and diversify their sound, most obviously by pushing the industrial metal envelope. Alas, all to no avail, as the majority of fans were not impressed with the mostly mediocre results heard on confused albums like Renewal and Cause for Conflict. Even the welcome addition of guitar ace Tommy Vetterli (ex-Coroner) lent more consistency than actual sparks to 1997's Outcast, and 1999's similarly dependable but hardly impressive Endorama eventually followed suit. Initial highlights such as "Golden Age," the title track, and "Chosen Few" are heavy on mid-paced grooves and gothic atmospherics, but still offer little songwriting redemption. For all their studiously constructed lyrics and supposed compositional maturity, they absolutely scream for some sign, any sign, of deeper emotion to snap them out of their glazed state of performed automation. Not even the keyboards that pervade the highly unorthodox "Passage to Babylon," nor the more energetic riffing contained in "Willing Sprit" can ultimately jolt the album into a higher plane of achievement, but then, Endorama still qualifies among Kreator's most cohesive statements from this under-achieving decade. And for what it's worth, Endorama would also become the final chapter of the group's experimental phase, which was emphatically obliterated two years later by Kreator's gloriously thrashing rebirth via their magnificent tenth album, Violent Revolution. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 10, 2005 | Nuclear Blast

Rock - Released January 17, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released June 19, 1989 | Noise Records

On Extreme Aggression, a successful Kreator close the '80s by delivering their final thrash triumph. With the most hallowed Kreator lineup (Mille Petrozza on vocals and guitar, Jörg "Tritze" Trzebiatowski on guitar, Jürgen "Ventor" Reil on drums, and bassist Rob Fioretti) joining forces once again to follow up the spectacular Terrible Certainty, Kreator sound determined to continue their thrash mastery on Extreme Aggression. The results are fierce and noisy on this 1989 Epic release -- the first major-label effort for the band. Petrozza and Fioretti's guitar work is as punchy as ever, and Reil's massive drums are unrelenting and continually improving. While the anonymous production has a slightly negative effect on Extreme Aggression, when compared to more commercially successful major-label thrash artists like Metallica, Kreator use their underground experience to fight through and present a unique package stuffed with hearty riffs and performances. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released September 25, 2001 | Nuclear Blast

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Metal - Released February 26, 2021 | Noise Records

German thrash metal band Kreator's 2021's box set, Under the Guillotine, takes a retrospective look at the band's career. This collection includes their first six records, from 1985's Endless Pain to 1992's Renewal, all of which were released by Noise Records. © Liam Martin /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 1, 1986 | Noise Records

Metal band Kreator had been around for awhile before they released Pleasure to Kill in 1986. Many in the underground metal scene were already paying special attention to the German outfit's proto-death sound, but the cult status was shed after this critically and commercially successful sophomore effort hit record-store shelves. As fierce and unyielding as the group's debut, Endless Pain, was, Pleasure to Kill provides double the sonic carnage and superior material. Standout tracks include the syncopated "Riot of Violence" and the sprawling closer "Awakening of the Gods." Pleasure to Kill might not be the best recording from Kreator, but in many ways, it could be the most significant. Fans of the group simply must own this seminal European metal offering. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released August 1, 1995 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Metal - Released June 19, 1989 | Noise Records

On Extreme Aggression, a successful Kreator close the '80s by delivering their final thrash triumph. With the most hallowed Kreator lineup (Mille Petrozza on vocals and guitar, Jörg "Tritze" Trzebiatowski on guitar, Jürgen "Ventor" Reil on drums, and bassist Rob Fioretti) joining forces once again to follow up the spectacular Terrible Certainty, Kreator sound determined to continue their thrash mastery on Extreme Aggression. The results are fierce and noisy on this 1989 Epic release -- the first major-label effort for the band. Petrozza and Fioretti's guitar work is as punchy as ever, and Reil's massive drums are unrelenting and continually improving. While the anonymous production has a slightly negative effect on Extreme Aggression, when compared to more commercially successful major-label thrash artists like Metallica, Kreator use their underground experience to fight through and present a unique package stuffed with hearty riffs and performances. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released January 13, 2009 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released October 26, 1992 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Metal - Released November 6, 1990 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 1, 1985 | Noise Records

Kreator would eventually become one of the dominant European thrash outfits of the late '80s, but their 1985 debut, Endless Pain, wasn't much more than a musical starting point from which the band sorely needed to grow. Promising moments during numbers like "Total Death," "Storm of the Beast," and "Living in Fear" hint at the group's eventual development into hard music pioneers. Putting all the pieces together into a single cohesive track -- much less a full-length record -- was a skill the German act had yet to acquire. This release is hardly an embarrassment, and it should satisfy any fan of the group looking to complete his or her collection, but new listeners searching for Kreator's best '80s material are encouraged to check out the follow-up, Pleasure to Kill, or the exquisite Terrible Certainty before considering Endless Pain. © Vincent Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 22, 1997 | Noise Records

After the remastered re-release of the first four albums of this pioneer band of European thrash metal, the following four deserve the same special treatment, headed by Coma of Souls that many consider to be Kreator’s major work. When a majority of bands jumped the thrash ship in hope of the same flamboyant success as Metallica, Kreator’s singer-guitarist and leader Mille Petrozza re-pledged his allegiance to the genre with a proper inventory of its best assets. Technically Kreator has nothing to envy to the Metallica of Kill ‘Em All, the Slayer of Show No Mercy and Hell Awaits or the Megadeth of Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good! or Peace Sells… but Who's Buying, nor to their counterparts from the German Big 4 − Sodom, Tankard and Destruction… Masterful sound, overpowering riffs, unleashed cavalcades of double bass drum, blistering solos (in the tradition of Kirk Hammett from early Metallica and Exodus), nasty aggressive singing…The only rare concessions made to a more consensual style of metal don’t go beyond a few melodic breaks in the style of Iron Maiden or Helloween, only more vindictive. Furthermore the quality of these re-released live tracks – recorded in Fürth in 1990 – is definitely worth pointing out, with no less than 17 tracks! Following this thrash punishment, Kreator surprised everyone by turning the page for a (too?) long time. Starting from Renewal, the band ventured in mixed singing − although not strictly speaking melodious, less offensive guitars and electronic sounds borrowed from industrial music… But in essence they remained closer to Megadeth and Metallica – whose Load they seemed to be anticipating (and even Lars Ulrich’s famous drumming on St. Anger) – than Ministry or Nine Inch Nails, but this change of course was not received enthusiastically. In hindsight, and with an optimised sound, its numerous quality became more apparent, starting with strong and varied compositions that have aged nicely.Not really resorting back to their thrash of predilection in Cause for Conflict, Kreator did take into consideration the success of Pantera, Machine Head and Sepultura to try and regain an optimum aggressiveness, even reincorporating the punk hard-core rock of thrash metal. But combining this newfound rage and vehement and inspired lyrics to a more modern sound. At least for the time being. As a bonus, the re-released version features the incredible Suicide in Swamps that was only released on the Scenarios of Violence compilation in 1996. For some (rather many), Kreator hit rock bottom in 1997 with Outcast, disavowing their origins and singularity. But others claim that it’s their most experimental and inspired album. Indeed the band is far from ridiculous when venturing on the territory of Rammstein, Nine Inch Nails or Marilyn Manson. The ten live tracks recorded at the Dynamo Open Air – including four from this forsaken album – clearly show that on stage, Kreator was far from the end of their rope. © Jean-Pierre Sabouret/Qobuz