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Hard Rock - Released July 31, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released January 12, 2018 | Lava Music - Republic Records

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Like most bands that have everything going for them, Black Veil Brides hasn’t been earning unanimous support since its first beats in 2006. This fifth album shouldn’t make a big difference, but it doesn’t really matter since it should sell like hot cakes, even more than the previous ones. If the whole sounds like what we called power metal not so long ago, and that we label as modern rock almost everywhere, the most relevant label would rather be “heavy pop”. On the fourth album, Black Veil Brides (or IV for some), BVB admittedly push the boundaries a little too far by recruiting Bob Rock, producer of the golden age of Mötley Crüe (their main and admitted reference) and most of all of the extremely famous “Black Album” from Metallica. And we know that the concerned party is unparalleled when it comes to making the most obscure hardcore band bankable. The result was a much too consensual album and above all infinitely too distant from the metalcore roots of the band, or rather the roots of its founder, singer Andy Biersack.With Vale, BVB doesn’t completely go back to its roots, or even to its very (too?) ambitious third album, the conceptual Wretched and Divine: The Story of the Wild Ones, but it strikes a happy medium by taking a tougher stance while creating melodies that couldn’t be more consensual. They were inspired to renew contacts with John Feldmann, who officiated on Wretched and Divine..., but also on the works of Disturbed, Papa Roach, The Used, Goldfinger and Blink 182, when he doesn’t compose for Good Charlotte, Hilary Duff and Beartooth... It’s mostly him who helped the singer on his solo album released under the pseudonym Andy Black. Helped by BVB’s soloist, Jake Pitts, Feldmann highlighted the rather pop writing (in which he took part) of most of the titles while developing a decidedly heavy sound. Listening to Vale, you’ll think as much of Nickelback (“Wake Up”, “Our Destiny”) as of Avenged Sevenfold (“The Outsider”, “My Vow”), even if the goal here is rather to seduce the youth who never heard of these “old bands”. You’ll remember in passing the rather similar approach, and rather successful, of the emo wave of My Chemical Romance and Fall Out Boy, especially since some members from those two bands came to help Biersack on his solo album. Just as the latter managed to convince a very young audience to go from Britney Spears and Beyoncé to rockier and more “guitar-oriented” music, BVB has every chance to be one of the frontrunners of a heavy movement more in line with the teens’ sensibilities. It’s an elixir of youth that has however little chance to find the right echo within the metal rearguard. ©JPS/Qobuz
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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Booklet
With their third album, Black Veil Brides complete their transformation from a heavily made-up metalcore band to a full-fledged gothic glam metal band, mixing drama and swagger on the sprawling and conceptual Wretched & Divine. Channeling the freewheeling power of Mötley Crüe into their moody sound, the album finds the band really carving out a niche for themselves among the faceless waves of metalcore/post-hardcore acts. While the 19-song Wretched & Divine is ostensibly a concept album complete with a two-act structure and recurring elements, stripping those elements away reveals an album that is, at its core, a pretty straightforward set of ripping glam metal. Though the conceptual elements do a great job of tying the album into the band's dark image, the music at the heart of the album is solid all on its own. That said, the two come together to create a pretty entertaining package of over the top rock & roll escapism, drawing the listener into the gloomy world created by Black Veil Brides before attempting to rock their socks off with some old-fashioned riffage and big singalong choruses. For fans of the band, the transition from metalcore to third wave glam will have been a (relatively) long time coming, given their steady transition to make their sound match their teased-out appearance. For anyone else who might've picked up this album and immediately began searching for the release date after seeing the bands photo on the back cover, Wretched & Divine is a solid album of neo-hard rock that might just be the thing your inner Crüe fan has been looking for. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released June 4, 2021 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released October 27, 2014 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Arriving just one year after the band's ambitious 2013 concept album Wretched and Divine: The Story of the Wild Ones, Black Veil Brides' eponymous fourth long-player continues the Tinseltown rockers' evolution from faceless metalcore noisemakers to Sunset Strip-burning glam metal revivalists with a fetish for grandiose, turn of the century emo. Kicking off with the one-two punch of "Heart of Fire" and "Faithless," both of which (for better or for worse) make a solid bid for modern rock radio/WWE montage domination, the 11-track set follows no story line, opting instead for coverage of traditional hard rock tropes like unspecified suffering and fighting the man, peppered with numerous references to fire, blood, death, and the breaking of chains. Musically, BVB offers up a torrent of furious riffing, monster pick-slides, and meaty percussion that falls somewhere in between "Kickstart My Heart," Godsmack, and Ride the Lightning-era Metallica, with highlights arriving via the jaunty (rhythmically) death vocal-led "Stolen Omen," the anthemic, Iron Maiden-twin, lead-driven closer "Crown of Thorns," the propulsive, pseudo-industrial highway jam "Devil in the Mirror," and the aforementioned first single "Faithless," but for the most part the band's fourth fireworks display lacks a solid finale. Bereft of the narrative that helped propel their last outing, BVB spends most of its time throwing things into the air and hoping something sticks, and while it may be polished, sharply honed, and delivered with confidence, it lacks both the gravitas and the hooks to get under your skin, despite how very badly it wants to impress. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 14, 2011 | Lava Music - Republic Records

For Black Veil Brides' first outing with Universal Republic, they tone back the emo-punk dramatics, and let their ‘80s hair metal freak flag fly. As their look suggests, Mötley Crüe and Kiss are big influences, as is Metallica, and elements of these three bands are evident throughout Set the World on Fire. Vocalist Andy Six (now going by his surname Andy Biersack) still has an emo way of singing, but has replaced his squawky screamo choruses with a gruff, James Hetfield growl that he interjects throughout. The slick production of Josh Abraham (30 Seconds to Mars and Linkin Park) marks a big change from We Stitch These Wounds, with no screaming to be heard until the three-quarter mark in the power ballad “Savior” (which starts as a tender love song, complete with string arrangements, before bursting into screeches.) That’s practically the only sign of metalcore, though, and the rest of the album is instead indebted to speed metal and modern rock. Guitarists Jake Pitts and Jinxx are the showstealers here, riffing in constant harmony, and incorporating the speedy guitar pyrotechnics of similar-minded bands like Dragonforce and Escape the Fate while throwing in showy Zack Wilde pinch harmonics, and Yngwie Malmsteen sweeps. Double kick-drum verses along with "hey!" shouts and “whoa oh oh” battle cry hooks, are semi-fun throwbacks to the days when Anthrax and Skid Row reigned supreme and songs like “Fallen Angels,” "Rebel Love Song," and “Love Isn’t Always Fair” have potential crossover appeal to Active Rock fans, even if Black Veil Brides are far from breaking new ground with their studded cod pieces and geisha makeup. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo
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Hard Rock - To be released October 29, 2021 | Sumerian Records

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Hard Rock - Released November 13, 2020 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released December 18, 2012 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Booklet
With their third album, Black Veil Brides complete their transformation from a heavily made-up metalcore band to a full-fledged gothic glam metal band, mixing drama and swagger on the sprawling and conceptual Wretched & Divine. Channeling the freewheeling power of Mötley Crüe into their moody sound, the album finds the band really carving out a niche for themselves among the faceless waves of metalcore/post-hardcore acts. While the 19-song Wretched & Divine is ostensibly a concept album complete with a two-act structure and recurring elements, stripping those elements away reveals an album that is, at its core, a pretty straightforward set of ripping glam metal. Though the conceptual elements do a great job of tying the album into the band's dark image, the music at the heart of the album is solid all on its own. That said, the two come together to create a pretty entertaining package of over the top rock & roll escapism, drawing the listener into the gloomy world created by Black Veil Brides before attempting to rock their socks off with some old-fashioned riffage and big singalong choruses. For fans of the band, the transition from metalcore to third wave glam will have been a (relatively) long time coming, given their steady transition to make their sound match their teased-out appearance. For anyone else who might've picked up this album and immediately began searching for the release date after seeing the bands photo on the back cover, Wretched & Divine is a solid album of neo-hard rock that might just be the thing your inner Crüe fan has been looking for. © Gregory Heaney /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | Sumerian Records

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Electronic - Released May 28, 2021 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Lava Music - Republic Records

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Hard Rock - Released April 9, 2021 | Sumerian Records

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Hard Rock - Released August 13, 2021 | Sumerian Records

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Rock - Released January 12, 2018 | Lava Music - Republic Records

Like most bands that have everything going for them, Black Veil Brides hasn’t been earning unanimous support since its first beats in 2006. This fifth album shouldn’t make a big difference, but it doesn’t really matter since it should sell like hot cakes, even more than the previous ones. If the whole sounds like what we called power metal not so long ago, and that we label as modern rock almost everywhere, the most relevant label would rather be “heavy pop”. On the fourth album, Black Veil Brides (or IV for some), BVB admittedly push the boundaries a little too far by recruiting Bob Rock, producer of the golden age of Mötley Crüe (their main and admitted reference) and most of all of the extremely famous “Black Album” from Metallica. And we know that the concerned party is unparalleled when it comes to making the most obscure hardcore band bankable. The result was a much too consensual album and above all infinitely too distant from the metalcore roots of the band, or rather the roots of its founder, singer Andy Biersack. With Vale, BVB doesn’t completely go back to its roots, or even to its very (too?) ambitious third album, the conceptual Wretched and Divine: The Story of the Wild Ones, but it strikes a happy medium by taking a tougher stance while creating melodies that couldn’t be more consensual. They were inspired to renew contacts with John Feldmann, who officiated on Wretched and Divine..., but also on the works of Disturbed, Papa Roach, The Used, Goldfinger and Blink 182, when he doesn’t compose for Good Charlotte, Hilary Duff and Beartooth... It’s mostly him who helped the singer on his solo album released under the pseudonym Andy Black. Helped by BVB’s soloist, Jake Pitts, Feldmann highlighted the rather pop writing (in which he took part) of most of the titles while developing a decidedly heavy sound. Listening to Vale, you’ll think as much of Nickelback (“Wake Up”, “Our Destiny”) as of Avenged Sevenfold (“The Outsider”, “My Vow”), even if the goal here is rather to seduce the youth who never heard of these “old bands”. You’ll remember in passing the rather similar approach, and rather successful, of the emo wave of My Chemical Romance and Fall Out Boy, especially since some members from those two bands came to help Biersack on his solo album. Just as the latter managed to convince a very young audience to go from Britney Spears and Beyoncé to rockier and more “guitar-oriented” music, BVB has every chance to be one of the frontrunners of a heavy movement more in line with the teens’ sensibilities. It’s an elixir of youth that has however little chance to find the right echo within the metal rearguard. ©JPS/Qobuz