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Film Soundtracks - Released April 23, 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
For his debut recording on Decca, pianist Benjamin Grosvenor performed music of Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Maurice Ravel, demonstrating both a keen awareness of his prodigious abilities and a knack for creating a balanced and interesting program. Chopin's four dynamic Scherzos are interspersed with three Nocturnes (chosen to correspond to the Scherzo's keys), while the remainder of the program is devoted to Liszt's transcriptions of two of Chopin's songs and the nocturne, En rêve, along with Ravel's notoriously difficult Gaspard de la nuit. The Chopin Scherzos are distinctively played with incisive attacks, commanding expression, and bravura speed, which, when taken altogether, make the gentle Nocturnes necessary interludes to leaven the Scherzos' volatile moods. The Liszt portion of the program is even lighter, with a nice mix of lyricism and colorful virtuosic turns, and the sweetness of the music balances the rather unsentimental Chopin interpretations. Less soothing is the dark and haunted music of Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit, which provides Grosvenor his finest moments. If any piece demonstrates this pianist's technical skills and expressive depth, then this tryptich succeeds, for it showcases his talent for weaving fantastic expressions and virtuosic playing into a magical, disturbing, and chilling experience. Even at the beginning of his career, Grosvenor shows maturity and insight, and he offers an admirable album that displays not only what he has achieved thus far, but promises great things ahead. This rising star bears watching and this CD demands repeated listening. © TiVo
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Classical - Released August 11, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Even at a very young age (he was 22 when this album was released in 2014), British pianist Benjamin Grosvenor had the kind of sound that makes his compatriots roll over and put their paws in the air. It's understated, dry, humorous, and technically unimpeachable. On an album of dances, will some listeners want more oomph in, say, the Chopin Andante spianato and Grande Polonaise Brillante, Op. 22? Sure, but on his own terms Grosvenor is indeed impressive, and not just for his age. The opening Bach Partita No. 4 in D major, BWV 828, is questionable in several ways; the interpretation seems capricious, and, even if you could explain connections conceptually, the work does not feel like it connects to the rest of the program. From there, however, things improve. The smaller works, most of all the Eight valses poéticos of Granados, are marvelously suited to Grosvenor's approach, and the usually splashy Arabesques on Johann Strauss' "By the Beautiful Blue Danube" are brought under control in a delightful way. The Boogie-Woogie Etude of Morton Gould is another effort that may be more satisfying within the U.K. than elsewhere, but for those looking for a savior of British music, Benjamin Grosvenor certainly bears watching. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 25, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
Following the success of his first Decca release of solo piano music by Chopin, Liszt, and Ravel, Benjamin Grosvenor demonstrates his aptitude in the concerto repertoire on his second CD, Rhapsody in Blue, recorded with James Judd and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. This is a refreshing change from the usual Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninov concertos one hears from young artists eager to impress, and Grosvenor is clever enough to play not only engaging concertos by Saint-Saëns, Ravel, and Gershwin, but to toss in short bon-bons by these composers to sweeten the program. Grosvenor has sometimes described as a Romantic pianist, which suggests anything from excessive sentimentality to headstrong individualism, but this is something of an exaggeration. It is true that Grosvenor has the passion and expressive grandeur for music of the period, notably displayed in Saint-Saëns' grandiose Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor, but he also possesses a modern sensibility that is ideal for the lighter textures and piquant expressions found in Ravel's effervescent Piano Concerto in G major and Gershwin's insouciant Rhapsody in Blue (performed here in the original jazz band version arranged by Ferde Grofé). Grosvenor is much more rounded in his tastes and abilities than may be apparent from reviews, but given time, his judgment in programming will be as obvious as his prodigious skills at the keyboard. Decca's reproduction is close-up and vivid, so the piano has real presence, and its volume almost eclipses the orchestra at times. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
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Classical - Released February 25, 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
Following the success of his first Decca release of solo piano music by Chopin, Liszt, and Ravel, Benjamin Grosvenor demonstrates his aptitude in the concerto repertoire on his second CD, Rhapsody in Blue, recorded with James Judd and the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. This is a refreshing change from the usual Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninov concertos one hears from young artists eager to impress, and Grosvenor is clever enough to play not only engaging concertos by Saint-Saëns, Ravel, and Gershwin, but to toss in short bon-bons by these composers to sweeten the program. Grosvenor has sometimes described as a Romantic pianist, which suggests anything from excessive sentimentality to headstrong individualism, but this is something of an exaggeration. It is true that Grosvenor has the passion and expressive grandeur for music of the period, notably displayed in Saint-Saëns' grandiose Piano Concerto No. 2 in G minor, but he also possesses a modern sensibility that is ideal for the lighter textures and piquant expressions found in Ravel's effervescent Piano Concerto in G major and Gershwin's insouciant Rhapsody in Blue (performed here in the original jazz band version arranged by Ferde Grofé). Grosvenor is much more rounded in his tastes and abilities than may be apparent from reviews, but given time, his judgment in programming will be as obvious as his prodigious skills at the keyboard. Decca's reproduction is close-up and vivid, so the piano has real presence, and its volume almost eclipses the orchestra at times. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 23, 2012 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
For his debut recording on Decca, pianist Benjamin Grosvenor performed music of Frédéric Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Maurice Ravel, demonstrating both a keen awareness of his prodigious abilities and a knack for creating a balanced and interesting program. Chopin's four dynamic Scherzos are interspersed with three Nocturnes (chosen to correspond to the Scherzo's keys), while the remainder of the program is devoted to Liszt's transcriptions of two of Chopin's songs and the nocturne, En rêve, along with Ravel's notoriously difficult Gaspard de la nuit. The Chopin Scherzos are distinctively played with incisive attacks, commanding expression, and bravura speed, which, when taken altogether, make the gentle Nocturnes necessary interludes to leaven the Scherzos' volatile moods. The Liszt portion of the program is even lighter, with a nice mix of lyricism and colorful virtuosic turns, and the sweetness of the music balances the rather unsentimental Chopin interpretations. Less soothing is the dark and haunted music of Ravel's Gaspard de la nuit, which provides Grosvenor his finest moments. If any piece demonstrates this pianist's technical skills and expressive depth, then this tryptich succeeds, for it showcases his talent for weaving fantastic expressions and virtuosic playing into a magical, disturbing, and chilling experience. Even at the beginning of his career, Grosvenor shows maturity and insight, and he offers an admirable album that displays not only what he has achieved thus far, but promises great things ahead. This rising star bears watching and this CD demands repeated listening. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - Gramophone Record of the Month - Le Choix de France Musique - Exceptional Sound Recording
Even at a very young age (he was 22 when this album was released in 2014), British pianist Benjamin Grosvenor had the kind of sound that makes his compatriots roll over and put their paws in the air. It's understated, dry, humorous, and technically unimpeachable. On an album of dances, will some listeners want more oomph in, say, the Chopin Andante spianato and Grande Polonaise Brillante, Op. 22? Sure, but on his own terms Grosvenor is indeed impressive, and not just for his age. The opening Bach Partita No. 4 in D major, BWV 828, is questionable in several ways; the interpretation seems capricious, and, even if you could explain connections conceptually, the work does not feel like it connects to the rest of the program. From there, however, things improve. The smaller works, most of all the Eight valses poéticos of Granados, are marvelously suited to Grosvenor's approach, and the usually splashy Arabesques on Johann Strauss' "By the Beautiful Blue Danube" are brought under control in a delightful way. The Boogie-Woogie Etude of Morton Gould is another effort that may be more satisfying within the U.K. than elsewhere, but for those looking for a savior of British music, Benjamin Grosvenor certainly bears watching. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 9, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Le Choix de France Musique - 4 étoiles Classica
Pianist Benjamin Grosvenor, 24 years old when this album appeared in 2016, has made a splash with his seemingly effortless technical mastery and his ability to put across a feeling of suppressed energy. There are many technical difficulties in these Romantic showpieces, but Grosvenor lets them roll off his fingers without raising the temperature much until the end, in the Liszt Tarantella from the Venezia e Napoli (Venice and Naples) set of Années de pèlerinage. It's an impressive display of control, said to be matched by considerable charisma in live performance. The program, which might have been played a century ago, is almost refreshing for that reason, but it's not totally coherent: the first three "Homages" are to Bach, while the last two are not homages to a person, but to cities, and to a pair of them at that. Still, the individual pieces work well on their own terms. César Franck's Prélude, Choral, et Fugue, FWV 21, benefits greatly from Grosvenor's ability to suggest currents of passion beneath the surface, and the Mendelssohn set of Six Preludes and Fugues, Op. 35, are sharply characterized and infused with an unusual degree of contrast for the collection, which often suffers from over-academic performances. This release showcases a young pianist with the potential to become a star in the time-honored Romantic virtuoso mold. © TiVo
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Classical - Released September 9, 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
Pianist Benjamin Grosvenor, 24 years old when this album appeared in 2016, has made a splash with his seemingly effortless technical mastery and his ability to put across a feeling of suppressed energy. There are many technical difficulties in these Romantic showpieces, but Grosvenor lets them roll off his fingers without raising the temperature much until the end, in the Liszt Tarantella from the Venezia e Napoli (Venice and Naples) set of Années de pèlerinage. It's an impressive display of control, said to be matched by considerable charisma in live performance. The program, which might have been played a century ago, is almost refreshing for that reason, but it's not totally coherent: the first three "Homages" are to Bach, while the last two are not homages to a person, but to cities, and to a pair of them at that. Still, the individual pieces work well on their own terms. César Franck's Prélude, Choral, et Fugue, FWV 21, benefits greatly from Grosvenor's ability to suggest currents of passion beneath the surface, and the Mendelssohn set of Six Preludes and Fugues, Op. 35, are sharply characterized and infused with an unusual degree of contrast for the collection, which often suffers from over-academic performances. This release showcases a young pianist with the potential to become a star in the time-honored Romantic virtuoso mold. © TiVo
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Classical - Released February 21, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or - 4F de Télérama - Le Choix de France Musique - Choc de Classica
The unconventional character that is Benjamin Grosvenor delivers us a very personal version of these two essential works of the piano repertoire. The first Brit to have signed an exclusive contract with Decca Classics in sixty years, he first made his name in 2004 when he won the Keyboard section of BBC Young Musician of the Year, thus throwing the doors open to an international career. Produced alongside the talented young conductor from Hong Kong Elim Chan, the musical director of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, this new album dedicated to Chopin revisits the young British prodigy’s first musical loves. It was following a very successful concert with Elim Chan that they decided to record the Piano concertos by Chopin together. In this fifth album (for Decca), it’s Grosvenor’s virtuosity and ability to make the instrument sing that allow him to fully express his favourite music. “Chopin was the first composer to whom I felt a strong connection to as a child. I have always been drawn to his music, and his piano concertos are among some of the finest in the repertoire”, he says. Other than his already legendary sound and the expert way he strikes a balance between the different acoustic levels, his vision underlines the dreamy romanticism that delicately envelops the two concertos by the then-20-year-old Polish composer. © François Hudry/QobuzThis album was named "Gramophone Recording of the Year 2020" in the"Concerto" category. 
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Classical - Released February 21, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

The unconventional character that is Benjamin Grosvenor delivers us a very personal version of these two essential works of the piano repertoire. The first Brit to have signed an exclusive contract with Decca Classics in sixty years, he first made his name in 2004 when he won the Keyboard section of BBC Young Musician of the Year, thus throwing the doors open to an international career. Produced alongside the talented young conductor from Hong Kong Elim Chan, the musical director of the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, this new album dedicated to Chopin revisits the young British prodigy’s first musical loves. It was following a very successful concert with Elim Chan that they decided to record the Piano concertos by Chopin together. In this fifth album (for Decca), it’s Grosvenor’s virtuosity and ability to make the instrument sing that allow him to fully express his favourite music. “Chopin was the first composer to whom I felt a strong connection to as a child. I have always been drawn to his music, and his piano concertos are among some of the finest in the repertoire”, he says. Other than his already legendary sound and the expert way he strikes a balance between the different acoustic levels, his vision underlines the dreamy romanticism that delicately envelops the two concertos by the then-20-year-old Polish composer. © François Hudry/Qobuz This album was named "Gramophone Recording of the Year 2020" in the"Concerto" category.  
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Classical - Released January 8, 2021 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 8, 2021 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released February 19, 2021 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or
For his new recital published on the Decca label, Benjamin Grosvenor has chosen Franz Liszt, whose music has followed him since his childhood thanks to his grandfather's initiation. Dedicated to the pianistic monument that is the Sonata in B minor, the English pianist's programme aims to bear witness to the various aspects underlying the Hungarian composer's creation with emblematic compositions (Petrarch's Three Sonnets), original ones (Lullaby), as well as the extraordinary power of re-creation that Liszt distilled in his paraphrases; here we find the Reminiscences of Norma after Bellini and his arrangement of Schubert's Ave Maria.Every concert and every recording of Grosvenor's music is long awaited and desired, so rich is his personality and his extraordinary pianistic mastery. His recent album devoted to the Frédéric Chopin Concertos confirmed the pre-eminence of this pianist within a well-to-do brotherhood.His vision of the famous Liszt Sonata is immediately among the most inspired. Like a bird of prey, Grosvenor knows how to wait for the right moment to pounce on the chords with diabolical precision and contained rage, in a dramatic Mephistophelian tension. At the same time, the fluidity of his piano opens the door to the twentieth century and particularly to Ravel's world so dependent on the Liszt lesson. It is known that Brahms had fallen asleep when Liszt played his Sonata to him after a probably drunken dinner. Nothing probable here with this powerful evocation of life and death. Magisterial! © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 19, 2021 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

For his new recital published on the Decca label, Benjamin Grosvenor has chosen Franz Liszt, whose music has followed him since his childhood thanks to his grandfather's initiation. Dedicated to the pianistic monument that is the Sonata in B minor, the English pianist's programme aims to bear witness to the various aspects underlying the Hungarian composer's creation with emblematic compositions (Petrarch's Three Sonnets), original ones (Lullaby), as well as the extraordinary power of re-creation that Liszt distilled in his paraphrases; here we find the Reminiscences of Norma after Bellini and his arrangement of Schubert's Ave Maria. Every concert and every recording of Grosvenor's music is long awaited and desired, so rich is his personality and his extraordinary pianistic mastery. His recent album devoted to the Frédéric Chopin Concertos confirmed the pre-eminence of this pianist within a well-to-do brotherhood. His vision of the famous Liszt Sonata is immediately among the most inspired. Like a bird of prey, Grosvenor knows how to wait for the right moment to pounce on the chords with diabolical precision and contained rage, in a dramatic Mephistophelian tension. At the same time, the fluidity of his piano opens the door to the twentieth century and particularly to Ravel's world so dependent on the Liszt lesson. It is known that Brahms had fallen asleep when Liszt played his Sonata to him after a probably drunken dinner. Nothing probable here with this powerful evocation of life and death. Magisterial! © François Hudry/Qobuz