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Classical - Released March 9, 2012 | Warner Classics

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Symphonies - Released November 16, 2018 | RCA Victor

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
This is an absolute MUST LISTEN. One of André Previn’s greatest recordings captured in the 1960s in London – truly a golden era for the American conductor! Here, the London Symphony Orchestra, galvanised and operating in the very heart of its repertoire, is at its most beautiful: the brass section is electric (listen to the Scherzo!), the woodwinds are poetic and the strings unrelenting in their rhythmicity... What sets this recording apart from any other are the very fast tempos, always kept within bounds by André Previn, that help unveil Walton’s great architectural sense in the most unique way – check out the magnificent coda of the initial Allegro assai; throughout this interpretation, Sibelius and Hindemith influences progressively fade away in favour of a truly distinctive orchestration and management of musical time that make this score what it really is: a real oddity in the British musical landscape of the 1930s. André Previn’s performance on the 26th and 27th of August 1966 – he went on to create a new version with the RPO for Telarc − is all the more striking when we consider that around the same time, with the same musicians, he was working on the complete symphonies of Ralph Vaughan Williams which lack in poetry, most probably suffering from the type of analytical frankness that actually exalts Walton’s Symphony No.1. A few years later, he also recorded Walton’s Symphony No.2 for EMI, again with the LSO. This can be enjoyed with wonderful sound recording by the Decca team, conducted here by James Lock. © Pierre-Yves Lascar
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Classical - Released February 23, 2009 | Warner Classics

Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
What Károly Goldmark and Ernó Dohnányi have in common is their national origin -- Hungary -- their harmonic language -- tonality -- their basic style -- Romanticism -- and, it must be said, their relative obscurity. What distinguishes them is primarily their dates. Goldmark (1830-1915) wrote in the fullest blooming of late Romantic nineteenth century Austro-Hungarian music alongside Brahms, Dvorák, and Bruckner. Dohnányi (1877-1960) began composing at the end of that era alongside Kodály and Bartók, and while atonality, serialism, neo-classicism, and a whole host of other languages, styles, and aesthetic systems came and went, he kept on composing in the same style he started with: rich, warm, and slightly spicy late Romanticism. As this two-disc EMI set shows, this business of dates is the crucial difference between the two composers. While Goldmark is certainly no Brahms or Bruckner, he is likewise no Bruch or Volkmann. The three works here, the tone poem Der gefessette Prometheus, the Violin Concerto, and the Rustic Wedding Symphony, show Goldmark had his own, distinctive style. There are memorable tunes, effective orchestrations, and expertly controlled forms in every movement of every work, and if Goldmark is not one of his time's front-rank composers, he still deserves a hearing by anyone who enjoys the music of the period. The performances here are a mixed lot. For the tone poem and concerto, James Conlon elicits strong and sympathetic playing from the Gürzenich-Orchester Kölner Philharmoniker and Sarah Chang turns in a powerfully characterized interpretation of the concerto's solo part. André Previn cannot quite bring off the same level of quality in the Rustic Wedding Symphony. While Previn's reading is charming and disarmingly direct, the Pittsburgh Symphony's playing is sometimes not altogether tight in more difficult passages and the blend is not always together in tuttis. Still, this is one of the most successful of recent recordings of this once popular piece and anyone unfamiliar with its delights should at least try it. The same cannot be said to the two works by Dohnányi. His greatest hit, the Variations on a Nursery Song, receives a lightly insouciant reading from pianist Cristina Ortiz, but as the saying goes, she could sue her accompanists, Kazuhiro Koizumi and the New Philharmonia Orchestra for lack of support. Much better is the performance of the Konzertstück for cello and orchestra by János Starker and the Philharmonia Orchestra under Walter Süsskind where the soloist is one of the great virtuoso cellists of his generation and the conductor is committed to working with him. But in the end, even he fails to present as persuasive a case for Dohnányi as Conlon and even Previn do for Goldmark. © TiVo

Vocal Jazz - Released April 14, 2014 | only456 music

Distinctions Golden Oldies
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Classical - Released January 1, 1974 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1982 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released May 30, 1997 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1977 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

André Previn moves seamlessly from the world of classical music to jazz and film, but on this occasion, the pianist covers 14 gems from the vast repertoire of George Gershwin. Well accompanied by bassist David Finck, Previn faces the same challenge every jazz musician must address: finding new paths through Gershwin's frequently recorded masterpieces. Previn uses a train-like bassline substitution to open and close a rollicking take of "They All Laughed," while the pianist is more laid-back in the bluesy treatment of "Oh, Lady Be Good" to better feature Finck initially. Previn's modification of "I Got Rhythm" provides some added dissonance. The haunting setting of the ballad "The Man I Love" suggests an added degree of melancholy. While this session was released on a classical label, Deutsche Grammophon, something that always seems to confuse record-label marketing departments, music store personnel, and consumers as well, it is very much a jazz date and a fine effort by André Previn and David Finck. © Ken Dryden /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 9, 2009 | Warner Classics

Recorded in 1974, André Previn's critically acclaimed performance of Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty has remained one of the most admired offerings in EMI's catalog, and the recording has been reissued several times since that date. In making the transition from LPs to CDs, two numbers -- the Pas Berrichon and the Sarabande at the end of Act III -- were cut from the complete recording to allow the ballet to fit on two discs. Apart from this modest alteration, most of Sleeping Beauty is preserved and it is still remarkably fresh sounding, even after digital remastering in 1993, which apparently removed any traces of analog hiss from an already clean recording. The London Symphony Orchestra made several terrific-sounding albums with Previn at this time, and the ensemble's energy, tone, blend, clarity, expression, and technique are all that could be desired of any world-class orchestra. With his career as a jazz pianist and composer, Previn surprised many with his recordings of the Romantic orchestral repertoire, and his great sympathy with Tchaikovsky's music made this performance especially satisfying because he drew particularly vivid and lively playing from his musicians. While this performance may not be superior to some of the Russian competition, it is certainly among the best by any western orchestra, and in terms of elegance and polish, it is still one of the very best ever released. This classic package is highly recommended for anyone who needs a handsome version of what is arguably Tchaikovsky's finest ballet. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1974 | Warner Classics

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Recorded in 1974, André Previn's critically acclaimed performance of Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky's Sleeping Beauty has remained one of the most admired offerings in EMI's catalog, and the recording has been reissued several times since that date. In making the transition from LPs to CDs, two numbers -- the Pas Berrichon and the Sarabande at the end of Act III -- were cut from the complete recording to allow the ballet to fit on two discs. Apart from this modest alteration, most of Sleeping Beauty is preserved and it is still remarkably fresh sounding, even after digital remastering in 1993, which apparently removed any traces of analog hiss from an already clean recording. The London Symphony Orchestra made several terrific-sounding albums with Previn at this time, and the ensemble's energy, tone, blend, clarity, expression, and technique are all that could be desired of any world-class orchestra. With his career as a jazz pianist and composer, Previn surprised many with his recordings of the Romantic orchestral repertoire, and his great sympathy with Tchaikovsky's music made this performance especially satisfying because he drew particularly vivid and lively playing from his musicians. While this performance may not be superior to some of the Russian competition, it is certainly among the best by any western orchestra, and in terms of elegance and polish, it is still one of the very best ever released. This classic package is highly recommended for anyone who needs a handsome version of what is arguably Tchaikovsky's finest ballet. © TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Universal Music Group International

Don't hate him because he's popular...or because of his sundry talents. Andre Previn may be best known as a conductor of symphony orchestras and as a film soundtrack composer, but he's a well-established jazz pianist as well. Previn's style is melodious and easygoing (influenced by piano masters Bud Powell and Oscar Peterson), but he can swing up a storm when he wants to. On ALONE, however, the mood is decidedly relaxed and touched with nostalgia as Previn embraces a set of emotionally charged standards. Songs like "Angel Eyes" and "I Can't Get Started" are timelessly poetic, while the sly "Andre's Blues" displays Previn's lighthearted side. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 28, 2005 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 28, 2005 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released November 9, 2009 | Warner Classics

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Pop - Released October 9, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

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Classical - Released January 1, 1982 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 1973 | Warner Classics

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Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Warner Classics