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Jazz - Released May 5, 2017 | Luaka Bop

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The title of this record is evidenced by the very first notes of opening track "Om Rama." A chorus of chanters armed with hand claps and tambourines light into a Hindu Bhajan, accompanied by Alice Coltrane's whirling Wurlitzer organ as she lays down brooding bass notes with one hand, moves her feet across those pedals with authority, and plays glissandi synth with the other hand -- immediate ecstasy. Then John Panduranga Henderson -- who sang with Ray Charles -- delivers a moaning, gospelized solo as Coltrane vamps on his blues. This isn't common Hare Krishna chanting, folks. This music is compiled from four privately pressed cassettes (Turiya Sings [1982]; Divine Songs [1987]; Infinite Chants [1992], and Glorious Chants [1995]) that Coltrane distributed to members of the Sai Antaram Ashram (which she founded) between 1982 and 1995. Some were recorded in professional studios; all were engineered by Baker Bigsby -- who oversaw the tape transfers here from the masters -- and represent a startling chapter in her musical legacy. The music exists in the space where "ecstatic" meets "heavy." Coltrane, known to her followers as Turiyasangitananda ("the Transcendental Lord’s highest song of bliss"), brought all of her musical history to bear in these pieces, from her beginnings playing piano in the churches of Detroit and the hard bop she played there to Paris and New York, to the vanguard, which she embraced with openness and helped to redefine with a softer, more spacious approach. The most amazing aspect of this music is what few have heard before: Coltrane's very deep and physical singing voice; her lead vocals are featured on most of the album, and it's another instrument she commands (though she wouldn't see it that way). On "Om Shanti," she accompanies herself on organ using breath control in an airy, devoted chant. On "Rama Rama," sarod, tablas, and her Oberheim synth add blissful dimensions to her quietly passionate singing. "Keshavas Murahara" commences with strings (her chart), Oberheim, and droning organ; her voice emerges as if from smoke, slowly intoning the prayer, dirge-like, but jazz informs her phrasing as the synth winds around her voice. The first half of "Journey in Satchidananda" features only her organ and Oberheim. It's droning, bluesy, and heavy -- nearly Gothic. When the Ashram Singers come in and Joshua Spiegelman adds a flute, some light enters. Tamil singer Sairam Iyer solos in his own language, opening the heart of the chant and bringing it home. Harp makes its presence felt on "Er Ra," where Coltrane's playing moves across Eastern and Western modes as her singing emerges in sweet, blues-inflected lines. Luaka Bop did everything right for The Ecstatic Music of Alice Coltrane Turyirasangitananda, from getting full participation from her family to create an amazing package with a great long essay by Ashley Khan, to reminiscences, to excellent sound. This is not just ecstatic music, but cosmic soul music. If you buy one archival recording this year, let this be it. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released July 16, 2021 | Alice Coltrane

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Often lost in the ever-expanding legend of John Coltrane is the fact that his wife Alice Coltrane —later also known by her Sanskrit name Turiyaasangitananda—was an accomplished pianist and harpist in her own right. She replaced McCoy Tyner in John's quartet and released more than a dozen albums under her name between 1968 and 1977. Coltrane was also a singer and in the mid-'70s became a spiritual teacher and established the The Vedantic Center, an ashram in the Santa Monica Mountains. It was there that she began experimenting with adding synthesizers, strings and sound effects to traditional chants, a pursuit that led to a 1982 cassette tape Turiya Sings, intended for the students in the ashram. In 2004 son Ravi Coltrane found a stripped down mix of the nine tracks with just her voice accompanied by Wurlitzer organ. A compilation from her ashram years, World Spirituality Classics 1: The Ecstatic Music of Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda was released to great acclaim in 2017; now an even deeper collection taken from the original 24-track tapes (mixed by Steve Genewick and mastered by Kevin Reeves, both of whom worked on her final album, 2004's Translinear Light), adds to Alice's spiritual legacy. Musically, these are sung and spoken chants of repeated phrases in Sanskrit, expertly accompanied by ghostly, pulsing chords on the Wurlitzer. While there are hints of a groove and some variation in the music in a piece like "Rama Katha," these are deeply spiritual pleas and very little of her jazz experience seeps into the pure, devotional hymns. In few instances, such as "Hara Siva," are hints of an actual song present. Coltrane's voice is strong throughout, her phrasing and intonation simple and unadorned. Clearly this was serious business, all of it given an odd ecclesiastic feel that will be instantly recognizable to anyone who's heard a church pipe organ. © Robert Baird/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1997 | GRP

Alice Coltrane's landmark Journey to Satchidananda reveals just how far the pianist and widow of John Coltrane had come in the three years after his death. The compositions here are wildly open and droning figures built on whole tones and minor modes. And while it's true that one can definitely hear her late husband's influence on this music, she wouldn't have had it any other way. Pharoah Sanders' playing on the title cut, "Shiva-Loka," and "Isis and Osiris" (which also features the Vishnu Wood on oud and Charlie Haden on bass) is gloriously restrained and melodic. Coltrane's harp playing, too, is an element of tonal expansion as much as it is a modal and melodic device. With a tamboura player, Cecil McBee on bass, Rashied Ali on drums, and Majid Shabazz on bells and tambourine, tracks such as "Stopover Bombay" and the D-minor, modally drenched "Something About John Coltrane" become an exercise in truly Eastern blues improvisation. Sanders plays soprano exclusively, and the interplay between it and Coltrane's piano and harp is mesmerizing. With the drone factor supplied either by the tamboura or the oud, the elongation of line and extended duration of intervallic exploration is wondrous. The depths to which these blues are played reveal their roots in African antiquity more fully than any jazz or blues music on record, a tenet that exists today, decades after the fact. One last note, the "Isis and Osiris" track, which was recorded live at the Village Gate, features some of the most intense bass and drum interplay -- as it exists between Haden and Ali -- in the history of vanguard jazz. Truly, this is a remarkable album, and necessary for anyone interested in the development of modal and experimental jazz. It's also remarkably accessible. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1996 | Impulse!

Sometimes written off as an also-ran to her more famous husband, Alice Coltrane's work of the late '60s and early '70s shows that she was a strong composer and performer in her own right, with a unique ability to impregnate her music with spirituality and gentleness without losing its edges or depth. Ptah, The El Daoud is a truly great album, and listeners who surrender themselves to it emerge on the other side of its 46 minutes transformed. From the purifying catharsis of the first moments of the title track to the last moments of "Mantra," with its disjointed piano dance and passionate ribbons of tenor cast out into the universe, the album resonates with beauty, clarity, and emotion. Coltrane's piano solo on "Turiya and Ramakrishna" is a lush, melancholy, soothing blues, punctuated only by hushed bells and the sandy whisper of Ben Riley's drums and later exchanged for an equally emotive solo by bassist Ron Carter. "Blue Nile" is a case where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts; Coltrane's sweeping flourishes on the harp nestle in perfectly with flute solos by Pharoah Sanders and Joe Henderson to produce a warm cocoon of sound that is colored by evocations of water, greenness, and birds. Perhaps as strong as the writing here, though, are the performances that Coltrane coaxes from her sidemen, especially the horn players. Joe Henderson, who can always be counted on for technical excellence, gives a performance that is simply on a whole other level from much of his other work -- freer, more open, and more fluid here than nearly anywhere else. Pharoah Sanders, who at times with John Coltrane seemed like a magnetic force of entropy, pulling him toward increasing levels of chaos, shows all of the innovation and spiritual energy here that he is known for, with none of the screeching. Overlooked and buried for years in obscurity, this album deserves to be embraced for the gem it is. © Stacia Proefrock /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released September 1, 1974 | Columbia

For his third duet album, Carlos Santana performed the works of John Coltrane, paired with Coltrane's widow, harpist/keyboardist Alice Coltrane, on this instrumental album. Side One includes several contemplative, string-filled numbers, while Side Two presents Santana's re-creation of John Coltrane's late free jazz style in "Angel of Sunlight." Columbia Records could not have been pleased at Santana's determined drift into esoteric jazz: Illuminations was the first of the nine Santana-related albums so far released in the U.S. not to go gold. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Impulse!

Alice Coltrane's 1968 solo debut on Impulse still stands tall in the artist's excellent discography. Coltrane had already gained a considerable education playing in the band of her late husband John during one of his boldest and most exploratory periods. The searching quality underpinning the saxophonist's last albums is also present on A Monastic Trio, as are the Eastern modalities and the balance between density and expansiveness often associated with Trane. But to consider Coltrane's debut a mere offshoot of her late husband's inventions is to do her a great disservice. Coltrane distinguishes herself as a composer (all the tunes on the album are hers), and as an instrumentalist (her harp playing, in particular, is noteworthy). A Monastic Trio also benefits from a superb personnel list, including Rashied Ali on drums, Jimmy Garrison on bass, and the irrepressible Pharoah Sanders on saxophone, flute, and bass clarinet. This recording remains one of the landmark debuts in avant-garde jazz. © Rovi Staff /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Impulse!

The eight tracks that make up multi-instrumentalist Alice Coltrane's volume of The Impulse Story series -- single CDs to accompany both the box set The House That Trane Built and Ashley Kahn's book of the same name, is among the most satisfying in the entire collection. The tracks here range widely, documenting an artist who was indeed ahead of her time -- and for many still is. Not that she cares. She's taken some 20 years off between her last recording for Warner Bros. and her final recording on this set to devote her time to spiritual concerns -- the title cut from her magnificent 2004 comeback release, Translinear Light, is a fitting inclusion here. Like her late husband, John, and like Pharoah Sanders, Alice defined the term "spiritual jazz" with her work. This disc kicks off with "The Sun," from the joint Coltrane/Coltrane outing Cosmic Music issued in 1968 (there are vocal recitations from Pharoah Sanders and John that were recorded earlier) and issued on CD as bonus material on A Monastic Trio. The other track from that album is the truly wonderful "Lovely Sky Boat," with Alice on harp, Jimmy Garrison on bass, and Rashied Ali playing drums. "Jaya Jaya Rama" is from the 1969 release Huntington Ashram Monastery, a record that has yet to be issued on CD in the United States -- though it has been beautifully remastered in Japan. The title cuts from Ptah the El Daoud, Journey in Satchidananda, and Universal Consciousness -- perhaps her finest studio moment from the 1970s -- are all included. Alice plays harp, organ, and piano, and arranges strings, and other musicians present on various pieces include Sanders, Joe Henderson, Ron Carter, Ben Riley, Cecil McBee, Ali, Leroy Jenkins, Jack DeJohnette, and even Ornette Coleman. Also rightfully included here by Kahn, who compiled these volumes, is "Excerpt from the Firebird" -- yes, the one composed by Igor Stravinsky where her Wurlitzer and harp are balanced by timpani and other percussion instruments. She also did the string arrangement. The aforementioned "Translinear Light," with Ms. Coltrane playing piano in the company of son Ravi playing tenor, bassist Charlie Haden, and DeJohnette on drums, is nearly ten minutes of sophisticated musical journeying that brings listeners full circle. All the titles here reflect the deep musical quest of the artist to speak from the heart of her spirituality. There isn't a weak moment here. And while true real fans can quibble all they wish about what got left off, there is no denying that this is one very powerful compilation and an excellent introduction to one of the most singular artists the "jazz" genre has ever produced. Highly recommended. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2004 | Impulse!

Translinear Light marks Alice Coltrane's return to recording after a 26-year hiatus. Her last outing, the live and marvelous Transfiguration, was issued by Warner Bros. in 1978. Coltrane's son, saxophonist and composer Ravi, produced the disc; he plays saxophones on five of the set's 11 cuts and contributes percussion to two others. Other musicians here include Charlie Haden, James Genus, Jeff Watts, Jack DeJohnette, and son Oran who plays alto in duet with her on one selection Translinear Light opens with a reprise of Alice's "Sita Ram," originally recorded for 1971's Universal Consciousness. Ms. Coltrane plays her signature style on the Wurlitzer organ with DeJohnette playing a synth drum and Ravi contributing organic percussion. Her long lines of individually played notes are set against a droning chorded backdrop, and are instantly recognizable. There is no speculation in her playing; an authoritative, deeply Eastern melodic sensibility saturates her improvisation. The shimmering piano intro of the traditional "Walk With Me," with its deep gospel roots set against a modal framework, brings the ancient hymn into the modern world and traces the artist's steps from her Detroit roots in the church to playing blues to the edge of the jazz vanguard without slipping into dissonance. It strolls back into a gently swinging lyric that almost literally sings atop the rhythm section of Watts and Genus before moving back to the open minor mode. The title cut is a ballad with Ravi on soprano and Haden and DeJohnette in support. The interplay betweenAlice and Ravi from the tune's slowly evolving head into the knotty modal chords and single-note runs that spark the dialogue, is simply breathtaking. The pair wind around and through one another as the rhythm section offers an insistent chromatic foundation. Though she has recorded them before, there are new readings of her late husband's "Crescent" and "Leo"; both offer new harmonic dimensions and emotional interpretations on the originals. She doesn't revisit them so much as recontextualize them musically. Ms. Coltrane plays piano on the former and a driven, fiery Wurlitzer on the latter, making the track a blistering maelstrom of activity. DeJohnette's drumming on these cuts is wildly incisive and canny. Ravi's soloing and accompaniment here -- and indeed throughout the album -- make this his most inspired performance on record. "Triloka," a duet with Haden, is sublime; a deeply meditative and lyrical work, it is especially poignant after the workout of "Leo." Ultimately, Translinear Light offers a poetic, well-rounded, and utterly convincing portrait of the artist's return to the public eye, at the top of her game. Translinear Light is a major entry in Coltrane's catalog. It is a defining, aesthetically brilliant statement from a master composer, improviser, and player. If ever there were a candidate for jazz album of 2004, Translinear Light is it. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 19, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1969 | GRP

4 stars out of 5 -- "HUNTINGTON ASHRAM MONASTERY has gales of harp sweeping over taut basslines and floating drums." © TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 10, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released May 10, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1972 | Impulse!

Lord of Lords, released in 1973, was Alice Coltrane's final album for Impulse! It was the final part of a trilogy that began with Universal Consciousness and continued with the expansive World Galaxy. Like its immediate predecessors, the album features a 16-piece string orchestra that Coltrane arranged and conducted, fronted by a trio in which she plays piano, Wurlitzer organ, harp, and timpani with bassist Charlie Haden and drummer Ben Riley. Riley was familiar with the setting because he had been part of the sessions for World Galaxy. The first two pieces, "Andromeda's Suffering" and "Sri Rama Ohnedaruth" (titled after the spiritual name for her late husband, John Coltrane), are, in essence, classical works. There is little improvisation except on the piano underneath the wall of strings. They are scored for large tone clusters and minor-key drone effects, but also engage in creating timbral overtones. They are quite beautiful, yet have little or nothing to do with jazz except for the seemingly free passages toward the end of the latter track, but even these feel scored, because of the control of tension and dynamic. "Excerpts from The Firebird," which uses the organ to open the piece, features the strings playing almost (because with Alice Coltrane, she interpreted in her own way) directly from Igor Stravinsky's score. The droning organ is so gorgeous underneath those reaching strings that it's breathtaking. As to why she chose this piece as the centerpiece for her own album, she claimed that Stravinsky came to her in a vision and passed something on to her in a glass vial, a liquid that she drank! Riley and Haden appear in earnest on the title track, a long modal piece where drones, rhythms, and time signatures are registered through the direction of Coltrane's piano and harp, creating a blissful kind of tension and dynamic. It cracks open at about six minutes, and Coltrane (on the organ), Haden, and Riley engage in some lively improvisation, with the strings offering trilling high-end swooping in the background. The set ends with Coltrane's transformation of a gospel hymn called "Going Home." Her harp introduces Riley's brushes and the strings, which in turn offer a root chord for her to play the melody and improvise upon it on the organ. Here the blues make their presence known. It offers a kind of understanding for the listener that Coltrane, no matter where this musical direction was headed (even as it went further toward the Cosmic Music she and her late husband envisioned together), continued to understand perfectly where her musical root was. The interplay between the three principals is lively and engaging, based on droning blues chords, and her soloing -- even amid flurries of notes -- comes right back to the root, and she quotes quite directly from Delta blues riffs and other gospel songs. Haden's bass is a beautiful anchor here (although mixed a bit low), and the strings offer a lovely response to her organ and harp. Riley's cymbals are shimmering shards of light throughout, ending Lord of Lords on a very high note. While it's true that Alice Coltrane's later Impulse! music may not be for everyone, even those who followed her earlier, more jazz-oriented recordings on Impulse!, it was obvious from the beginning that she was seeking to incorporate Indian classical music's drone center into her work, and was literally obsessed with the timbral, chromatic, and harmonic possibilities of strings. She succeeds here, in ending her Impulse! period with elegance, grace, and soul. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 2, 2021 | Alice Coltrane

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1971 | Verve

Recorded between April and June of 1971, Alice Coltrane's Universal Consciousness stands as her classic work. As a testament to the articulation of her spiritual principles, Universal Consciousness stands even above World Galaxy as a recording where the medium of music, both composed and improvised, perfectly united the realms of body (in performance), speech (in the utterance of individual instrumentalists and group interplay), and mind (absolute focus) for the listener to take into their own experience. While many regard Universal Consciousness as a "jazz" album, it transcends even free jazz by its reliance on deeply thematic harmonic material and the closely controlled sonic dynamics in its richly hued chromatic palette. The set opens with the title track, where strings engage large washes of Coltrane's harp as Jack DeJohnette's drums careen in a spirit dance around the outer edge of the maelstrom. On first listen, the string section and the harp are in counter-dictum, moving against each other in a modal cascade of sounds, but this soon proves erroneous as Coltrane's harp actually embellishes the timbral glissandos pouring forth. Likewise, Jimmy Garrison's bass seeks to ground the proceedings to DeJohnette's singing rhythms, and finally Coltrane moves the entire engagement to another dimension with her organ. Leroy Jenkins' violin, and Garrison's bottom two strings entwine one another in Ornette Coleman's transcription, as Coltrane and the other strings offer a middling bridge for exploration. It's breathtaking. On "Battle at Armageddon," the violence depicted is internal; contrapuntal rhythmic impulses whirl around each other as Coltrane's organ and harp go head to head with Rashied Ali's drums. "Oh Allah" rounds out side one with a gorgeously droning, awe-inspiring modal approach to whole-tone music that enfolds itself into the lines of organic polyphony as the strings color each intervalically. DeJohnette's brushwork lisps around the edges, and Garrison's bass underscores each chord and key change in Coltrane's constant flow of thought. On side two, "Hare Krishna" is a chant-like piece that is birthed from minor-key ascendancy with a loping string figure transcribed by Coleman from Coltrane's composition on the organ. She lies deep in the cut, offering large shimmering chords that twirl -- eventually -- around high-register ostinatos and pedal work. It's easily the most beautiful and accessible track in the set, in that it sings with a devotion that has at its base the full complement of Coltrane's compositional palette. "Sita Ram" is a piece that echoes "Hare Krishna" in that it employs Garrison and drummer Clifford Jarvis, but replaces the strings with a tambura player. Everything here moves very slowly, harp and organ drift into and out of one another like breath, and the rhythm section -- informed by the tambura's drone -- lilts on Coltrane's every line. As the single-fingered lines engage the rhythm section more fully toward the end of the tune, it feels like a soloist improvising over a chanting choir. Finally, the album ends with another duet between Ali and Coltrane. Ali uses wind chimes as well as his trap kit, and what transpires between the two is an organically erected modal architecture, where texture and timbre offer the faces of varying intervals: Dynamic, improvisational logic and tonal exploration become elemental figures in an intimate yet universal conversation that has the search itself, and the uncertain nature of our arrival, either musically or spiritually, at its very root. This ambiguity is the only way a recording like this could possibly end, with spiritual questioning and yearning in such a musically sophisticated and unpretentious way. The answers to those questions can perhaps be found in the heart of the music itself. More than likely, though, the music will make its way into the recesses of the human heart, where the question will be fully answered. This is art of the highest order, conceived by a brilliant mind, poetically presented in exquisite collaboration by divinely inspired musicians and humbly offered as a gift to listeners. It is a true masterpiece. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1971 | Impulse!

Alice Coltrane had become a musical world unto herself by the time she issued World Galaxy, recorded in late 1971. With jazz-rock fusion taking over the mainstream and the terminal avant-garde heading over to Europe, Coltrane stubbornly forged an insistent, ever-evolving brand of spiritual jazz that bore her own signature as much as it did her late husband's influence. On the two days in November when World Galaxy was recorded, Coltrane chose drummer Ben Riley, bassist Reggie Workman, violinist Leroy Jenkins, saxophonist Frank Lowe, and timpanist Elayne Jones in addition to a string orchestra of 16 to help her realize her latest vision. Coltrane herself plays piano, harp, and organ on this date, sometimes within a single track, as she does on her glorious post-modal reworking of "My Favorite Things." This was a gutsy move, considering it was one of John Coltrane's signature tunes, but Alice has it firmly in hand as she moves from organ to harp to piano and back, turning the melody inside out wide enough for the strings to whip up an atmospheric texture that simultaneously evokes heaven and hell and skewers the prissy nature of the tune in favor of bent polyharmonics that allow the entire world of sound inside to play. The jazz modalism Coltrane presents on "Galaxy Around Olodumare" is quickly undone by Lowe in his solo and reconstructed into polyphony by the string section; it's remarkable. The harp work on "Galaxy in Turiya" (Alice's religious name) is among her most beautiful, creating her own wash of color and dynamic for the strings to fall like water from the sky into her mix. As colors shift and change, the rhythm section responds, and focuses them in the prism of Coltrane's textured harpistry. The album closes with another John Coltrane signature, "A Love Supreme," here given an out of this world treatment by the band with Jenkins playing full force through the middle of both channels. There is a narration by Coltrane's guru inside it, a poem really, spoken by the great guru Satchidananda, which no doubt would have moved John Coltrane, but the real news is Alice's killer, funky breakbeat organ solo that covers the tune top to bottom in blues, in stark contrast to Jenkins' improvisation. This set may take some getting used to for some, but it's easily one of the strongest records Alice Coltrane ever released, and one of the finest moments in jazz from the early '70s. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1999 | Impulse!

For those about to get terribly excited at the prospect of a new Alice Coltrane album, don't; this is a compilation from her years on Impulse! solo and with her late husband. But, given the radical juxtaposition of some of these works, this seems like a new Alice disc just the same. Assembled by the crack team of Patrick Forge and Kerstan Mackness, this set is gorgeously sequenced and, while debatable among people who have nothing better to do, is the only way this track selection could go. Quibbling over the actual tunes is ridiculous: "Lovely Sky Boat," "I Want to See You," "Galaxy in Turyia," "Blue Nile," "Universal Consciousness," "Battle at Armageddon," "A Love Supreme" (the version from World Galaxy with Frank Lowe on saxophone, Ben Riley on drums, and Reggie Workman on bass with Alice playing piano, organ, and harp, as well as a string section), "Journey in Satchidananda," "Galaxy Around Oldumare," and the tracks "Peace on Earth," from John Coltrane's Infinity album, and "The Sun," from the controversial Cosmic Music album. They are impeccable choices that represent the full range of Alice Coltrane's shamefully undernoticed contribution to jazz. Here, with a host of musicians that includes not only those previously mentioned, but also Pharoah Sanders, Jack DeJohnette, Jimmy Garrison, Rashied Ali, Joe Henderson, Leroy Jenkins, Elvin Jones, Ron Carter, and many others, the depth and dimension of Alice Coltrane's musical vision can be articulated within the context of (mostly) her own work. Again, the way that Mackness and Forge have culled and sequenced the track selection is seamless, offering the development of Coltrane's creative voice as a pianist, harpist, organist, composer, and improviser -- not to mention arranger -- as a process, a constant evolution from high to even higher. The music is revelatory in how it uses color and tension to articulate tonal speech, and how it uses improvisation within the context of particular timbres. For those who have the catalog, this may come as a welcome refresher course; for those encountering Alice Coltrane's work for the first time, there simply is no other choice. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Jazz - Released May 10, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Jazz - Released July 16, 2021 | Alice Coltrane

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Jazz - Released June 2, 2021 | Alice Coltrane