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The Dream of Gerontius, op. 38 - Blest Pair of Sirens - I was glad

London Symphony Chorus

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released July 1, 2013 | Chandos

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Serge Prokofiev

Alexander Ivashkin

Classical - Released June 30, 2008 | Chandos

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Œuvres pour clarinette (Intégrale)

Janet Hilton

Classical - Released January 1, 2007 | Chandos

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Invocation à la Musique

Della Jones

Vocal Music (Secular and Sacred) - Released February 1, 2006 | Chandos

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Messe Sabrinensis - Stabat Mater

Gennady Rozhdestvensky

Sacred Vocal Music - Released August 1, 2005 | Chandos

Booklet
As a composer of British choral music, Herbert Howells is sometimes considered a follower of Sir Charles Villiers Stanford and Hubert Parry. Yet the expansively breathed counterpoint, lush orchestral sounds, and impressionistic harmonies in his large choral works, such as the Missa Sabrinensis and the Stabat Mater on this 2005 Chandos compilation, mark him more accurately as a fellow traveler with Ralph Vaughan Williams in the English pastoral movement. (Interestingly, though both men composed works for religious uses, Howells and Vaughan Williams seem to have been agnostics who viewed composing sacred music merely as an opportunity to write glorious works for choir). Recorded in 1994 and 1995 by Gennady Rozhdestvensky and the London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, these mystical choral works sound symphonically spacious and almost cosmic in range and depth, quite far removed from any practical ecclesiastical functions. Indeed, the Missa Sabrinensis seems closer in a nearly pantheistic spirit to Vaughan Williams' "Sea" Symphony in its poetic wafting, and the ecstatic singing of soprano Janice Watson, mezzo-soprano Della Jones, tenor Martyn Hill, and baritone Donald Maxwell contributes to the striking resemblance between the two works. Chandos offers remarkable reproduction in these recordings, gorgeous in the Missa Sabrinensis, and at times bracing in the Stabat Mater. © TiVo
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ELGAR: Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2 / The Sanguine Fan / Froissart

Bryden Thomson

Symphonic Music - Released March 1, 2005 | Chandos

Booklet
Although there are many fine things in them, as well as several superb moments, Bryden Thomson's recordings of Elgar's symphonies are not quite convincing. The problem is not the London Philharmonic; the musicians have known these works since they were in knee-pants and play them with virtuosity and affection. The problem is not Thomson's conducting, which is often insightful and always skillful. The problem is Thomson's interpretations, which are decidedly individualistic, sometimes brilliant, and more often eccentric. The solemn sublimity of the First Symphony's opening Andante and the tragic depths of the Second Symphony's Larghetto are wonderfully caught, but the heroic strength of the First Symphony's closing Allegro and the autumnal radiance of the Second Symphony's closing pages are lacking. Thomson's interpretations make Elgar's symphonies sound at once more morose and more nervous by making them sound less late Romantic and more proto-Modernist. Depending on how you like your Elgar, this is not necessarily a change for the better. The Sanguine Fan ballet music is light and Thomson's interpretation is distantly affectionate. The Froissart Overture is bright and Thomson's interpretation is casually refreshing. © TiVo
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Musique de Chambre

Lydia Mordkovitch

Chamber Music - Released July 1, 1995 | Chandos

Booklet
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Benjamin Britten: Œuvres pour orchestre

Various Artists

Symphonic Music - Released February 1, 1999 | Chandos

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Œuvres pour orchestre

Neeme Järvi

Symphonic Music - Released February 1, 1991 | Chandos

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Poèmes symphoniques (intégrale)

Neeme Järvi

Symphonic Poems - Released February 1, 1989 | Chandos

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Sibelius: Tone Poems

Alexander Gibson

Classical - Released November 1, 2004 | Chandos

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
These discs restore to the catalog Alexander Gibson and the Scottish National Orchestra's 1977 recordings of ten of Sibelius' tone poems. Most of the favorites are here -- Finlandia and En Saga, but not, however, Valse Triste -- and most of the performances are first-rate. Gibson was a powerfully individualistic conductor whose Sibelius interpretations were dramatically heroic at their best. Gibson is at his best in the less well-known works. His Night Ride and Sunrise is evocative and ecstatic. His The Oceanides is supple and mysterious. Some listeners might find his Tapiola too fast, but none would deny its strength. And all listeners will find his Luonnotar with soprano Phyllis Bryn-Julson overwhelmingly compelling. With the technically superb and brilliantly colorful playing of the Scottish National Orchestra, Gibson's Sibelius recordings are arguably the best English Sibelius recordings between Barbirolli and Colin Davis. Chandos' 2004 remastering of the 1977 recordings is superlative. The originals were hard, harsh, and glassy, but these reissues are deep, lush, and warm. © TiVo
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Stravinski: 3 Symphonies, Ode, Le baiser de la fée

Various Interprets

Classical - Released March 1, 1985 | Chandos

Booklet
It is always surprising to be confronted with the 'early' works of Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971), when our appreciation of the composer is inevitably measured by his ballet The Rite of Spring (1913), a flash of genius by a young man in his early thirties, from which the musical world of the 20th and 21st centuries has still not recovered. Six years earlier, in 1907, the Russian had completed his first major work, his Symphony in E flat major, which he dedicated to his master Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov. A somewhat lengthy work, which sounds like a study exercise in terms of form, with a truly Russian Scherzo and which is unquestionably influenced by the lesser-known symphonies of his master and those of Borodin. Stravinsky's first opus is distinguished by quite original ideas in his orchestration, the writing for the brass section revealing at times, a desire to be elsewhere, which will materialise more precisely in the Scherzo fantastique (Op. 3). When Stravinsky composed his two other symphonies, he was in the United States and had nothing left to prove, his genius totally assured. One after another came the Symphony in C in 1939-1940 (shortly after the death of his daughter, his wife and then his mother), and the Symphony in Three Movements, between 1941 and 1945. We have a tendency to neglect the first two, in favour of the radical Symphony in Three Movements which clearly reassured those music lovers who wanted to hear Stravinsky again as a revolutionary and enfant terrible in the 1910s. The Symphony in C, not sparing with melodic motifs (Larghetto concertante) is a truly neo-classical work despite its many sections which openly introduce the repetitive and the minimalist; its twin, based more on highly sequential and even more fragmented motifs, finds in its relentless rhythm a character clearly reminiscent of the Parisian ballets.All of Sir Alexander Gibson's (1926-1995) Stravinsky works—for the Chandos label—are at the pinnacle of the discography. The selection reviewed here includes the complete double LP released in 1982 with the three Symphonies and the Ode from 1943. With his assured genius, Sir Alexander Gibson unifies the three symphonies: his ardent touches, his sense of rhythm (always implacable but never dry or cold), his orchestra literally on fire, where the timbres burst out like razor blades, remain without equal in the world of discography. Suddenly, these scores come to life, becoming imaginary ballets—Symphony in Three Movements here remains totally spellbinding. The tenderness (Eulogy) and vigorous lyricism (Eclogue) that Gibson unleashes in the Ode, as in the Andante of the Symphony in Three Movements, are in reality no less to be treasured. Be it noted that Gibson has also recorded the Pulcinella Suite and Stravinsky's Danses Concertantes: imbued here with a similar intensity and presence (English Chamber Orchestra, 13-14 July 1982).As part of this reissue, Chandos has decided to complement the magical Gibson LP with very beautiful versions of Symphonies of Wind Instruments conducted by Simon Rattle (1977, with the Nash Ensemble, the recording released later, in 1982, as part of a Chandos LP titled ‘Stravinsky: A Tapestry of Songs and Chamber Music’), and of The Fairy's Kiss with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra under Neeme Järvi (1984). © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz