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The Black Keys|Thickfreakness

Thickfreakness

The Black Keys

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The Black Keys shot to fame in 2010, packing out huge stadiums with their sixth album Brothers. The album artwork paid tribute to a controversial Howlin’ Wolf album (This is Howlin’ Wolf’s New Album. He Doesn’t Like It…) and it was a sign. A sign that all the music they love stems from the blues, even if they also explore other avenues. That’s exactly how they started, playing the blues as a duo in their native industrial Midwest (Akron, Ohio), while dreaming of electric juke joints in Mississippi. The Black Keys have never expressed their love for the blues as much as on Thickfreakness, their second album (and for blues fans, their best). The record where Dan Auerbach carved steaks out of the soft belly of the blues by playing guitar haché with an overpowering sound. The one where drummer Pat Carney seemed to be playing to calm his nerves after a day at the factory. They had faith, rage and hunger in their stomachs, tired and hungry for success. As much inspired by the electric blues of North Mississippi (notably Junior Kimbrough) as by proto-punk (from The Stooges to The Sonics, covering their song Have Love Will Travel), the Black Keys wrote their own legend. Listening to this record on top volume is like sticking your head out of the window of a car speeding down a sun-burned road. Only without all the midges in your face. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz

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Thickfreakness

The Black Keys

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1
Thickfreakness
00:03:48

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

2
Hard Row
00:03:15

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

3
Set You Free
00:02:46

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

4
Midnight in Her Eyes
00:04:03

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

5
Have Love Will Travel
00:03:04

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

6
Hurt Like Mine
00:03:27

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

7
Everywhere I Go
00:05:40

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

8
No Trust
00:03:38

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

9
If You See Me
00:02:52

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

10
Hold Me in Your Arms
00:03:19

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

11
I Cry Alone
00:02:48

The Black Keys, MainArtist

(C) 2003 Fat Posssum Records (P) 2003 Fat Possum Records, LLC

Album Description

The Black Keys shot to fame in 2010, packing out huge stadiums with their sixth album Brothers. The album artwork paid tribute to a controversial Howlin’ Wolf album (This is Howlin’ Wolf’s New Album. He Doesn’t Like It…) and it was a sign. A sign that all the music they love stems from the blues, even if they also explore other avenues. That’s exactly how they started, playing the blues as a duo in their native industrial Midwest (Akron, Ohio), while dreaming of electric juke joints in Mississippi. The Black Keys have never expressed their love for the blues as much as on Thickfreakness, their second album (and for blues fans, their best). The record where Dan Auerbach carved steaks out of the soft belly of the blues by playing guitar haché with an overpowering sound. The one where drummer Pat Carney seemed to be playing to calm his nerves after a day at the factory. They had faith, rage and hunger in their stomachs, tired and hungry for success. As much inspired by the electric blues of North Mississippi (notably Junior Kimbrough) as by proto-punk (from The Stooges to The Sonics, covering their song Have Love Will Travel), the Black Keys wrote their own legend. Listening to this record on top volume is like sticking your head out of the window of a car speeding down a sun-burned road. Only without all the midges in your face. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz

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The Black Keys in 10 Songs

From 2001, The Black Keys have been reminding the world about the real roots of the Blues, cutting away all the frills and unnecessary solos. Their music has always been untamed, abrupt and minimalist. Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney developed this unique style over the course of two decades, without once selling their souls to the devil at a Mississippi crossroads. Here are ten songs to prove it.

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