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Martina McBride|Shine

Shine

Martina McBride

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Shine is Martina McBride's first recording in two years, following up her successful album Waking Up Laughing. While the previous album was entirely self-produced -- a rare reward in Nashville, but one McBride earned with a string of platinum selling recordings -- on this set she is listed as a co-producer with the veteran Dan Huff. As is customary, husband John recorded and engineered the set. McBride has long been associated with anthemic songs, and an album by her without them would seem incomplete; in other words, there have to be real showcases for that incredibly powerful singing voice of hers, and Shine is no exception. The album's first single, "I Just Call You Mine," has the big swelling choruses, enormous string arrangements, wailing electric guitars, and singing pedal steel -- all with larger than life drums by Matt Chamberlain -- fits that bill. The set opener, "Wrong Baby Wrong," is another trope in McBride's arsenal in that it contains an uplifiting message of perseverance in tough times all set to a catchy, insistent, guitar-based rocker complete with power chords in the intro. What's most compelling about Shine, though, is its sound. In many ways, McBride has always been among the most contemporary sounding of her peers while always maintaining a sound of her own. Not so this time out. In fact, this disc sounds more like a Keith Urban record than it does one of McBride's. And that's not necessarily a criticism, just a bit of a shock. Musically it's consistent all the way through. The songs are all of a piece and flow seamlessly from one another. Textures are also remarkably similar, but the difference is the rock & roll sound at the heart of Shine. And make no mistake, McBride can sing rock as well as anything else she sets her mind to. Check the wildly celebratory single "Ride," with its shuffling, big drums and chugging guitars (which feel almost like outtakes from .38 Special's hit book) and the gradually ascending chorus. That said, even the ballads come across with a very modern slant -- check the faux Celtic "Wild Rebel Rose," or the breakup anthem "Walk Away," that gives way to rock in the chorus with its Urban-esque banjo textures flowing through the drums, pedal steel and power chords with a lilting fiddle tag. The set closes with another McBride trademark, the big, sophisticated adult contemporary ballad disguised as contemporary country music -- the one thing here Keith Urban wouldn't attempt on one of his own records: "Lies." A lone piano accompanies the vocalist through a heartwrenching verse. It threatens to explode at every turn, especially when the strings enter, but the tension just builds as synths, a slow, funereal snare and bass drum, and a dollop of acoustic guitar come in. Finally, two thirds of the way through, it does, but it's McBride's voice exploding over the top of the instrumentation that never competes with her. It remains staid so she can allow the catharsis to come pouring out. This is a solid, consistent date all the way through that is evidence of McBride's long chart success.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

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Shine

Martina McBride

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1
Wrong Baby Wrong Baby Wrong
00:03:41

Brad Warren, Lyricist - Brad Warren, Composer - Harry Stinson, Background Vocal - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer - Robert Ellis Orrall, Lyricist - Robert Ellis Orrall, Composer - Stephen Barker Liles, Composer - Stephen Barker Liles, Lyricist - Brett Warren, Lyricist - Brett Warren, Composer

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

2
I Just Call You Mine
00:04:20

Jenifer Wrinkle, Background Vocal - Ty Lacy, Lyricist - Ty Lacy, Composer - Jerry Flowers, Background Vocal - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer - Jess Cates, Composer - Jess Cates, Lyricist - Dennis Matkosky, Composer - Dennis Matkosky, Lyricist

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

3
Sunny Side Up
00:03:01

Brad Warren, Lyricist - Brad Warren, Composer - Jenifer Wrinkle, Background Vocal - Martina McBride, Composer - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Martina McBride, Lyricist - Dann Huff, Producer - Brett Warren, Lyricist - Brett Warren, Composer - Sarah Buxton, Background Vocal

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

4
Walk Away
00:03:45

Russell Terrell, Background Vocal - Jesse Walker, Lyricist - Jesse Walker, Composer - Jenifer Wrinkle, Background Vocal - Nathan Chapman, Lyricist - Nathan Chapman, Composer - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer - Lisa Cochran, Background Vocal - Liz Rose, Composer - Liz Rose, Lyricist

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

5
I'm Trying
00:04:01

Tia Sillers, Lyricist - Tia Sillers, Composer - Darrell Scott, Lyricist - Darrell Scott, Composer - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

6
What Do I Have To Do
00:03:41

Russell Terrell, Background Vocal - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer - Tom Shapiro, Composer - Tom Shapiro, Lyricist - Lisa Cochran, Background Vocal - Neil Thrasher, Lyricist - Neil Thrasher, Composer - Michael Dulaney, Lyricist - Michael Dulaney, Composer

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

7
Don't Cost A Dime
00:03:12

Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Martina McBride, Background Vocal - Josh Kear, Composer - Josh Kear, Lyricist - Carolyn Dawn Johnson, Background Vocal - Dann Huff, Producer - Mark Irwin, Composer - Mark Irwin, Lyricist - Chris Tompkins, Lyricist - Chris Tompkins, Composer

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

8
Ride
00:03:52

Chris A. Robbins, Lyricist - Chris A. Robbins, Composer - Jenifer Wrinkle, Background Vocal - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Jerry Flowers, Background Vocal - Dann Huff, Producer - Michael Davey, Composer - Michael Davey, Lyricist - Andrew Dorff, Composer - Andrew Dorff, Lyricist

(P) 2008 Sony Music Entertainment

9
You're Not Leaving Me
00:03:45

Gordie Sampson, Lyricist - Gordie Sampson, Composer - Jenifer Wrinkle, Background Vocal - Jerry Flowers, Background Vocal - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer - Troy Verges, Composer - Troy Verges, Lyricist - Hillary Lindsey, Composer - Hillary Lindsey, Lyricist

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

10
Wild Rebel Rose
00:03:55

Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Josh Kear, Composer - Josh Kear, Lyricist - Dann Huff, Producer - Mark Irwin, Composer - Mark Irwin, Lyricist

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

11
Lies
00:04:06

Tania Hancheroff, Composer - Tania Hancheroff, Lyricist - Gerald O'Brien, Lyricist - Gerald O'Brien, Composer - Martina McBride, Performer - Martina McBride, Producer - Dann Huff, Producer - Catt Gravitt, Composer - Catt Gravitt, Lyricist

(P) 2009 Sony Music Entertainment

Album Description

Shine is Martina McBride's first recording in two years, following up her successful album Waking Up Laughing. While the previous album was entirely self-produced -- a rare reward in Nashville, but one McBride earned with a string of platinum selling recordings -- on this set she is listed as a co-producer with the veteran Dan Huff. As is customary, husband John recorded and engineered the set. McBride has long been associated with anthemic songs, and an album by her without them would seem incomplete; in other words, there have to be real showcases for that incredibly powerful singing voice of hers, and Shine is no exception. The album's first single, "I Just Call You Mine," has the big swelling choruses, enormous string arrangements, wailing electric guitars, and singing pedal steel -- all with larger than life drums by Matt Chamberlain -- fits that bill. The set opener, "Wrong Baby Wrong," is another trope in McBride's arsenal in that it contains an uplifiting message of perseverance in tough times all set to a catchy, insistent, guitar-based rocker complete with power chords in the intro. What's most compelling about Shine, though, is its sound. In many ways, McBride has always been among the most contemporary sounding of her peers while always maintaining a sound of her own. Not so this time out. In fact, this disc sounds more like a Keith Urban record than it does one of McBride's. And that's not necessarily a criticism, just a bit of a shock. Musically it's consistent all the way through. The songs are all of a piece and flow seamlessly from one another. Textures are also remarkably similar, but the difference is the rock & roll sound at the heart of Shine. And make no mistake, McBride can sing rock as well as anything else she sets her mind to. Check the wildly celebratory single "Ride," with its shuffling, big drums and chugging guitars (which feel almost like outtakes from .38 Special's hit book) and the gradually ascending chorus. That said, even the ballads come across with a very modern slant -- check the faux Celtic "Wild Rebel Rose," or the breakup anthem "Walk Away," that gives way to rock in the chorus with its Urban-esque banjo textures flowing through the drums, pedal steel and power chords with a lilting fiddle tag. The set closes with another McBride trademark, the big, sophisticated adult contemporary ballad disguised as contemporary country music -- the one thing here Keith Urban wouldn't attempt on one of his own records: "Lies." A lone piano accompanies the vocalist through a heartwrenching verse. It threatens to explode at every turn, especially when the strings enter, but the tension just builds as synths, a slow, funereal snare and bass drum, and a dollop of acoustic guitar come in. Finally, two thirds of the way through, it does, but it's McBride's voice exploding over the top of the instrumentation that never competes with her. It remains staid so she can allow the catharsis to come pouring out. This is a solid, consistent date all the way through that is evidence of McBride's long chart success.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

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