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Rock - Publicación prevista el 19 de noviembre de 2021 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 11 de junio de 2021 | UMe Direct 2

Off the Soundboard: Tokyo Dome, March 13, 2001, is the inaugural installment of Kiss' official live bootleg series. Recorded directly off of the soundboard, the 21-track set delivers the quintessential Kiss live experience, with Paul Stanley, Gene Simmons, Ace Frehley, and Eric Singer in top form. Songs include beloved hits like "Rock & Roll All Night," "I Was Made for Lovin' You," "Cold Gin," and "Detroit Rock City," as well as deeper cuts such as "I Still Love You" and "Black Diamond." © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 2 de junio de 2017 | UMe Direct 2

This career-spanning single-disc best-of from the legendary pop-metal rockers was released to coincide with their world tour of the same name. Full of powerhouse riffs and anthemic tunes, it includes all the massive hits that immortalized the band, like "Crazy Crazy Nights," "I Was Made for Lovin' You," "God Gave Rock 'n' Roll to You II," "Calling Dr. Love," "Hard Luck Woman," and "Love Gun." Providing a concise summation of the band's career, it would make an ideal starting point for neophytes. © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 10 de junio de 2016 | UMe Direct 2

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 15 de abril de 2016 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 19 de febrero de 2016 | UMe Direct 2

Rock - Publicado el 18 de febrero de 2016 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 13 de noviembre de 2015 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 13 de noviembre de 2015 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 23 de marzo de 2014 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 30 de junio de 1977 | UMe Direct 2

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Love Gun was Kiss' fifth studio album in three years (and seventh release overall, peaking at number four on Billboard), and proved to be the last release that the original lineup played on. By 1977, Kiss merchandise was flooding the marketplace (lunch boxes, makeup kits, comic books, etc.), and it would ultimately lead to a Kiss backlash in the '80s. But the band was still focused on their music for Love Gun, similar in sound and approach to Rock and Roll Over, their previous straight-ahead rock release. It included Ace Frehley's lead vocals on "Shock Me," as well as one of Kiss' best and most renowned hard rockers in the thunderous title track. The album's opener, "I Stole Your Love," also served as the opening number on Kiss' ensuing tour, while "Christine Sixteen" is one of the few Kiss tracks to contain piano prominently. "Almost Human" is an underrated rocker and features a great Jimi Hendrix-esque guitar solo from Frehley (no doubt due to ex-Hendrix producer Eddie Kramer manning the boards again), while "Plaster Caster" is a tribute to the famous groupies of the same name. The only weak spots on an otherwise stellar album are an obvious "Rock and Roll All Nite" ripoff titled "Tomorrow and Tonight," and a pointless remake of the Phil Spector-penned classic "Then He Kissed Me" (reworked as "Then She Kissed Me"). © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 26 de mayo de 2014 | UMe Direct 2

Released just weeks after the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame succumbed and put "the hottest band in the world!" on their honor roll, the Kiss 40 compilation landed in order to celebrate four decades of rock & rollin' all night, and partying every day. The track list is filled with classics and desirable extras with hits like "Nothin' to Lose," "Beth," and "Lick It Up" appearing in their original studio and/or singles versions, while other blockbusters appear in alternate versions like "Detroit Rock City" in its Kiss Symphony: Alive IV recording and "God of Thunder" in demo form. This is partly due to the set's rule of "one track from every major album release" so that demo checks off 2001's The Box Set while the live version of "Room Service" takes care of the woeful comp You Wanted the Best, You Got the Best!. Even the four solo albums from 1978 get their due, and they fall heavily toward the Gene and Ace half of the band in terms of quality ("Radioactive" and "New York Groove" respectively) with Peter and Paul running way behind (only Kiss Army commanders will recall "You Matter to Me" or "Hold Me, Touch Me [Think of Me When We're Apart]"). Of special interest is the unreleased "Reputation," a "Christine Sixteen"-like rocker where Gene Simmons barks out the kind of sexy and self-serving lyrics for which he owns the patent ("She was young, and she loved me, she really couldn't live without me/She gave me all she could, she loves control"). All and all, Kiss 40 does a nice job following its odd song-per-album rule, and knocks off fringe releases like Sonic Boom Over Europe and Carnival of Souls: The Final Sessions with ease, but it takes a mega-fan to appreciate how well this task was executed, so consider its high score for those who know the Music from "The Elder" album inside and out. This is a triumph of format and the band's longevity, and not necessarily a knockout introduction. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 30 de junio de 1977 | UMe Direct 2

Libreto
Love Gun was Kiss' fifth studio album in three years (and seventh release overall, peaking at number four on Billboard), and proved to be the last release that the original lineup played on. By 1977, Kiss merchandise was flooding the marketplace (lunch boxes, makeup kits, comic books, etc.), and it would ultimately lead to a Kiss backlash in the '80s. But the band was still focused on their music for Love Gun, similar in sound and approach to Rock and Roll Over, their previous straight-ahead rock release. It included Ace Frehley's lead vocals on "Shock Me," as well as one of Kiss' best and most renowned hard rockers in the thunderous title track. The album's opener, "I Stole Your Love," also served as the opening number on Kiss' ensuing tour, while "Christine Sixteen" is one of the few Kiss tracks to contain piano prominently. "Almost Human" is an underrated rocker and features a great Jimi Hendrix-esque guitar solo from Frehley (no doubt due to ex-Hendrix producer Eddie Kramer manning the boards again), while "Plaster Caster" is a tribute to the famous groupies of the same name. The only weak spots on an otherwise stellar album are an obvious "Rock and Roll All Nite" ripoff titled "Tomorrow and Tonight," and a pointless remake of the Phil Spector-penned classic "Then He Kissed Me" (reworked as "Then She Kissed Me"). © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de mayo de 1982 | UMe Direct 2

1981's The Elder was such a bomb worldwide that Kiss' record company outside the U.S., Casablanca/Phonogram, demanded that the band immediately assemble another greatest-hits package to prove to their befuddled fans that they were still a heavy metal group, not experimental prog rockers. Since a greatest-hits set was issued just four years prior in the form of the double LP Double Platinum, the band decided to include four brand-new tracks along with some hits, under the title of Killers (a single album). The new tracks ("I'm a Legend Tonight," "Down on Your Knees," "Nowhere to Run," "Partners in Crime") resembled the Kiss of old more than anything the band had released for a few years by this point (again, guitarist Bob "Alive II" Kulick subs for Ace Frehley). The only hits on Killers that hadn't already appeared on Double Platinum were "I Was Made for Loving You," "Sure Know Something," and "Rock and Roll All Nite (Live)"; the rest were repeats ("Love Gun," "Detroit Rock City," "God of Thunder," "Cold Gin," and "Shout It out Loud"). Killers didn't accomplish what the record company hoped it would -- re-establishing Kiss as chart-toppers -- but it did show their fans outside the U.S. that the band meant business again. [The Australian and Japanese versions of Killers include a slightly different track listing.] © Greg Prato /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 15 de octubre de 2012 | UMe Direct 2

Monster, el vigésimo álbum de estudio de Kiss es una tremenda regresión a la atmósfera de fiesta salvaje y heavy metal apocalíptico de discos como Destroyer y Love Gun, lleno de riffs pesados, batería demoledora, los característicos aullidos demoníacos de Gene Simmons y el colosal talento de Paul Stanley para el cachondeo, además de un abundante uso de cencerros, superior incluso al promedio de 1977. Estas nuevas doce canciones quizás no bastarán para conseguir muchos nuevos reclutas para el Kiss Army, pero la familiaridad de este material hará sin duda las delicias de los innumerables fans de múltiples generaciones que han crecido y pasado sus años dorados escuchando a Kiss. De hecho, Monster alcanza sus mejores momentos cuando los Kiss se limitan a reescribir el sonido que desarrollaron de jóvenes y mantienen las cosas simples, predecibles y divertidas. © Fred Thomas /TiVo
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Ambientes - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | UMe Direct 2

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Rock - Publicado el 22 de septiembre de 1998 | UMe Direct 2

Since the 1996 reunion tour was a blockbuster success, Paul Stanley and Gene Simmons decided to keep Peter Criss and Ace Frehley around for a little while longer -- long enough to record a full-fledged reunion album, Psycho Circus. Anyone expecting a stylistic breakthrough from a reunited (allegedly revitalized) Kiss would be unfamiliar with the band's history. Throughout the years, the only real change has been in the guitarists and drummers; the band's sleazy, big, dumb pop-metal has remained the same. The problem is, it's the kind of music that sounds more convincing when it's performed by a young, hungry band that makes records on the cheap. That way, the albums really sound as sleazy as the men who make them. As the band pushes 50, Kiss no longer sound young, hungry, or sleazy -- they sound like professional dirty old men. And since they're professionals, they can turn out some catchy hooks when called upon, but Psycho Circus ultimately feels worn out, more of a huge advertisement for an impending tour than a full-fledged record. Certainly, they're crafty enough to toss out a few anthems to please fans ("I Pledge Allegiance to the State of Rock & Roll," "You Wanted the Best"), and that may be enough to appease fans longing for an album by a reunited Kiss, especially since Frehley is a better, more charismatic guitarist than anyone else that has floated through the band. But cynics (i.e., anyone who isn't a hardcore fan) will probably view it as pandering. Which raises an interesting question: who is more cynical, Kiss for writing fan-baiting rock & roll anthems simply to sell records, or the reviewers who call them on it? © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 28 de octubre de 1997 | UMe Direct 2

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Before Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley reunited with Ace Frehley and Peter Criss, they recorded Carnival of Souls with guitarist Bruce Kulick and drummer Eric Singer, intending to release the record either in late 1995 or early 1996. Once the reunion took off, Carnival of Souls was shelved and Kulick and Singer were unceremoniously given their walking papers, the final chapter of their history erased from public record. Unsurprisingly, the unreleased album became a hot bootleg in collector's circles, paving the way for its official release in the fall of 1997. In some ways, it should have stayed unreleased, since Carnival of Souls hardly captures Kiss at their best. None of the songs, either the predictable rockers or the by-the-book power ballads, stand out, and the music sounds canned, forced, and over-produced, with little of the self-deprecating humor that made the comeback tour a success. Only the dedicated -- who probably already own it on bootleg -- will have the patience to wade through the record to find the few minor items of worth. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 28 de octubre de 1997 | UMe Direct 2

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Before Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley reunited with Ace Frehley and Peter Criss, they recorded Carnival of Souls with guitarist Bruce Kulick and drummer Eric Singer, intending to release the record either in late 1995 or early 1996. Once the reunion took off, Carnival of Souls was shelved and Kulick and Singer were unceremoniously given their walking papers, the final chapter of their history erased from public record. Unsurprisingly, the unreleased album became a hot bootleg in collector's circles, paving the way for its official release in the fall of 1997. In some ways, it should have stayed unreleased, since Carnival of Souls hardly captures Kiss at their best. None of the songs, either the predictable rockers or the by-the-book power ballads, stand out, and the music sounds canned, forced, and over-produced, with little of the self-deprecating humor that made the comeback tour a success. Only the dedicated -- who probably already own it on bootleg -- will have the patience to wade through the record to find the few minor items of worth. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 14 de octubre de 1997 | UMe Direct 2

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