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Clásica - Publicado el 15 de enero de 2021 | Ramée

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Diapason d'or
‘Music for a while / Shall all your cares beguile’ : in this famous song, Purcell invokes the power of music to soothe – at least temporarily – our pain and suffering. But do we really want to be soothed? Or do we prefer to cultivate our melancholy, in the company of Michel Lambert: ‘No, I sing not to charm away my sadness, but rather to maintain it’? In the St. John Passion, Bach associates the funereal sweetness of the viol with the death of Christ. Like him, many other composers have chosen the instrument to evoke mourning. The pieces recorded on this album form a frame of melancholy music, just as the Japanese character 優(Yuu) expresses the gentleness of ‘a person who stands next to someone who is sad’. Through the vector of these melancholy pieces, the Japanese gambist Kaori Uemura makes her viol sing to maintain, but also to console sadness. © Ramée
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Clásica - Publicado el 19 de febrero de 2021 | Ramée

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Diapason d'or
Unlike many of his contemporaries, Johann Sebastian Bach never intended to compose flute sonatas or partitas in sets of 6 or 12, as was customary at the time (and as he himself did for violin, cello and harpsichord). Bach's flute sonatas evolved over a roughly 30-year period between ca. 1717–1747 as he encountered the different types of flute in fashion at the time, and met several greatly skilled flautists. The question of which flautist and flute makers Bach may have known played a decisive role in choosing the programme on this recording. In preparation, Frank Theuns compared and assessed the playing qualities of various early eighteenth-century flute types. Eventually, he decided on a copy of a flute made by Pierre-Gabriel Buffardin. The balanced, brilliant, Italianate sound of this instrument was a perfect match for the demands of this repertoire. As well as being an unequalled flautist and an accomplished composer, Buffardin was also a renowned flute maker whom Bach may have met in Dresden in 1717. © Ramée
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Clásica - Publicado el 26 de marzo de 2021 | Ramée

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Diapason d'or
Königsberg in East Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia) was a rare haven of peace during the Thirty Years’ War thanks to its geographical location. Many people, including artists and musicians, fled there from the horrors of plague and war. Heinrich Albert, a pupil of Heinrich Schütz (his cousin) and Johann Hermann Schein, the Thomaskantor in Leipzig, was appointed cathedral organist in the city in 1630. His garden hut, overgrown with pumpkin vines and suitably dubbed the ‘pumpkin hut’ (Kürbishütte), became the meeting place of the Königsberg Circle of Poets: a refuge and a space for cutting-edge creativity, spared from direct involvement in the war. Five musical tableaux, depicting different stages in the war, take the listener on an emotional journey and reflect the everyday emotions people of the period experienced: hope, fear, a longing for peace – but also despair and wrestling with faith in the face of the devastation of war. © Ramée
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Clásica - Publicado el 24 de mayo de 2019 | Ramée

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Diapason d'or
It was no less than Bach, Germanic though he may have been, who pointed out that a German composer was expected to master multiple national styles: Italian, French, English, and (this is the one that's been sorely neglected) Polish. It was Telemann who put the idea into practice fully, and what his music lacked in contrapuntal depth, it made up for in sheer variety. He is perhaps not quite the "chameleon" of the title, but he was certainly versatile and liked to combine styles within a single composition. This release by the Dutch historical-instrument group New Collegium (formerly the Collegium Musicum Den Haag) doesn't capture that variety in full; it's mostly the Italian and French styles that are emphasized here, with an occasional feint toward German counterpoint, as in the Alla breve of the Suite from Der getreue Music-Meister. However, the playing is lively and sparkling in the main, and within its stylistic window, the group explores some interesting pieces. Sample around in the Concerto à 3 for 2 violini discordati and violone in A major, TWV Anh. 42:A1. "Discordati" describes the phenomenon generally called scordatura, and the piece is full of unusual sonorities from the violins and accompanying plucked violone, an unusual instrument in itself. Yet, the most unusual feature is the concluding Bourrée, a French dance following on three Italian movements, and Telemann makes this sound natural. Minuets, quite a contemporary dance in Germany at the time, punctuate the program effectively. New Collegium doesn't get good support from Ramée's engineers; the Oude Kerk Zwijndrecht is too coolly remote for this music of Gemütlichkeit. Nevertheless, this is a worthy Telemann release with some unusual music. © TiVo
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Música vocal (profana y sacra) - Publicado el 9 de noviembre de 2018 | Ramée

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Diapason d'or
Here's something fascinating: music from the 14th and early 15th centuries, lost for hundreds of years, has now been rediscovered thanks to some space-age technology. Because, in fact, the original manuscripts were never lost. In reality, the paper had been scrubbed and recycled or covered over with palimpsests because of the prohibitive price of parchment at the time. And so a whole body of Florentine works from the era of Petrarch, Boccacio, Dante and Machiavelli was erased to make room for 16th century poems. A careful examination of the San Lorenzo Palimpsest revealed that multi-spectral photography (anyone who knows what that is, raise your hand…) of the pages can render the underlying layer perfectly legible, and so now 111 pages of music from the 14th century can see the light of day. After six hundred years of multi-spectral silence, these pieces are interpreted here by the La Morra ensemble, which specialises in late medieval and Renaissance music with voice and instruments like the lute, vielle, clavicymbalum and recorder. There is an intensity of emotion in hearing these pieces which until now we never knew existed, written by composers of whom we know almost nothing such as Giovanni Mazzuoli and his son Piero, Paolo da Firenze or Jacopo da Bologna. Here they take centre stage. © SM/Qobuz