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Pop - Publicado el 10 de abril de 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Publicado el 15 de octubre de 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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The release of Gold Dust was inevitable, and was recorded to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the release of Little Earthquakes, the album that established Tori Amos as one of the premier -- if not the premier -- singer/songwriters of her generation. Here she revisits songs from her catalog backed by the famed Metropole Orchestra conducted by Jules Buckley. Amos recorded live with the orchestra in the Netherlands, making it a greatest-hits comp with a twist. It works. The songs keep their inherent melodies and basic arrangements, and the Metropole Orchestra underscores the inherent drama in them without overwhelming them (no easy feat). While everyone will have her favorites -- or be disappointed about those that have been left out -- the arc of the album works quite well. Songs like "Marianne" and "Yes Anastasia" are as direct and compelling as ever. The title track, with its elegiac intro, is more elaborate, yet never gives in to excess. "Precious Things" is, if anything, more militant, even as it proclaims "let these precious things be." The gospel feel in the chords that introduce "Snow Cherries from France" are quickly supplanted by a near-theatrical feel. The set closes with "Girl Disappearing" from American Doll Posse. In this arrangement, subtler shades of meaning are coaxed from the lyric by the orchestra and by more elaborate piano flourishes from Amos. Gold Dust is another of Amos' dreams realized -- to record live with an orchestra -- and it is most certainly for her dedicated fans, who will no doubt find elements in these new versions to enjoy. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 4 de diciembre de 2020 | Decca (UMO)

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At the close of 2020, a year of unexpected change and intensity across the globe, piano maestro and singer/songwriter Tori Amos gifted fans with a four-track holiday EP, Christmastide. Returning to the seasonal realm for the first time since 2009's Midwinter Graces, Amos aimed to provide solace and lift spirits after a tumultuous year rocked by the COVID-19 pandemic, social unrest, and an ugly U.S. presidential election cycle, comforting listeners during a unique yuletide season where more families than usual would be separated by social distancing, politics, and quarantine. Joining her for the snow-covered journey are familiar faces from eras past, namely drummer Matt Chamberlain and bassist Jon Evans, who were an integral part of Amos' vision for the better part of a decade. Together, the trio conjure sonic warmth that will be instantly familiar to diehards, recalling Amos' 2000s run from Scarlet's Walk to American Doll Posse. Opening with the appropriately festive "Christmastide," Amos sets the stage with sparkling piano, the full breadth of her rhythmic duo, and angelic vocal harmony with her daughter, Natashya Hawley, before plunging into a darker and more bittersweet space with the dramatic "Circle of Seasons" and pensive "Holly," a pair of standouts that are most evocative of Amos' classic sound. On robust closer "Better Angels," Amos sings, "Oh, what a year to be here/on this little rock, third from the sun/And we need some mercy." Weary but hopeful, she beseeches the heavens to "help us, save us" as Chamberlain's drums crash atop Evans' grooves, a rallying cry to harness as much power as we can muster for a better, brighter future. Although frustratingly short -- a full album in this vein might have been her best in a decade -- Christmastide is an absolute treat and one of the better things to come of a very trying year. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 13 de abril de 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Publicado el 18 de noviembre de 2016 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Publicado el 9 de mayo de 2014 | Mercury KX

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Unrepentant Geraldines -- its title so knowingly Tori it verges on parody -- finds Tori Amos delivering original songs, which isn't a common occurrence for her in the new millennium. Following on the heels of the interpretive 2012 set Gold Dust, it's the first collection of original material since 2011's Night of the Hunters, but it seems as if its roots stretch back even farther, as it is a bright, open collection, sometimes suggesting her early-'90s heyday but never pandering toward the past. There's a nice tension on this record, as Amos gives her hardcore fans what they want -- left turns tempered with introspection -- while also wooing the skeptics with melody and color, giving the record a bright, open feel that stands in contrast to the handsome solipsism that characterized many of her new millennial records. Strictly speaking, there's not much here that signifies as "pop" -- there are hooks, both melodic and rhythmic, but they seem almost incidental to feel, as the record flits between meditation and extroversion, its warmest moments also being its most intimate. Amos operates like a veteran liberated by her dedicated audience; she never once assumes she'll lose her audience, so she taunts them, sometimes seducing but often teasing, operating just outside of the parameters of what is expected or acceptable for Tori. That's the real pleasure of Unrepentant Geraldines: it's lush and melodic but also barbed, sometimes seeming dissonant but often consoling, its soothing qualities eventually turning disturbing. This has long been Amos' calling card, this shimmering space between comfort and pain, but Unrepentant Geraldines trumps its predecessors by accentuating its polarity; it either seduces with its sweetness or it provokes with its pain, and either extreme is compelling. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 10 de abril de 2015 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop - Publicado el 29 de octubre de 2002 | Epic

Perhaps Tori Amos didn't intentionally whittle her audience down to merely the rabidly devoted ever since Boys for Pele, but it sure seemed that way with the deliberately abstract arrangements, double albums, and cover records. That devoted cult may be all that pay attention to Scarlet's Walk, her first album for Epic, but it marks a return to the sound and feel of Under the Pink and is her best album since then. Much was made at the time of release about its concept -- conceived as a journey through modern womanhood, when Tori herself journeyed through each state in the union -- but following the narrative is secondary to the feel of the music, which is warm, melodic, and welcoming, never feeling labored as so much of her last four albums often did. This doesn't mean it's an altogether easy listen: an intensive listen reveals layers of pain and an uneasiness murmuring underneath the surface, but it's delivered reassuringly, in croons and lush arrangements that nevertheless are filled with quirks, making it both comforting and provocative. Which, of course, is what Tori Amos delivered in her early years. If this isn't as startling as Little Earthquakes or majestic as Under the Pink, so be it. It's confident, alluring, and accomplished, luring listeners in instead of daring them to follow. And, frankly, it's a relief that she finally delivered another record like that. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 8 de septiembre de 2017 | Mercury KX

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En su décimoquinto álbum Tori Amos apunta a asuntos actualmente de lo más candentes. En Native Invader la artista norteamericana trata de la naturaleza y de cómo, mediante procesos de resilencia, se regenera a sí misma. Lo que supone a la vez para la cantante una forma de abordar nuestra responsabilidad en la destrucción del planeta e incluso de la especie humana. La política no está ausente, pues, en este trabajo de una Tori Amos que siempre ha optado por el compromiso. En lo referente a la producción, todo está diseñado para que brille su inimitable y harto reconocible voz desde los primeros compases. En sus comienzos, en los albores de la década de los 90, sus discos eran comparados con los primeros de Kate Bush y Elton John. Pero Tori Amos pronto dejaría atrás esas influencias, que sin suponer ningún demérito menospreciaban la originalidad de sus composiciones. Y en la actualidad, tal como demuestra de nuevo Native Invader, la suya es una figura sin parangón situada al margen de cualquier moda musical, concentrada en el arte de escribir canciones perfectas, melodías difíciles de olvidar. Y estribillos que uno tararearía hasta el amanecer. © CM/Qobuz
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Pop/Rock - Publicado el 22 de septiembre de 2008 | earMUSIC Classics

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Pop - Publicado el 17 de septiembre de 2001 | Atlantic Records

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 8 de septiembre de 2017 | Mercury KX

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En su décimoquinto álbum Tori Amos apunta a asuntos actualmente de lo más candentes. En Native Invader la artista norteamericana trata de la naturaleza y de cómo, mediante procesos de resilencia, se regenera a sí misma. Lo que supone a la vez para la cantante una forma de abordar nuestra responsabilidad en la destrucción del planeta e incluso de la especie humana. La política no está ausente, pues, en este trabajo de una Tori Amos que siempre ha optado por el compromiso. En lo referente a la producción, todo está diseñado para que brille su inimitable y harto reconocible voz desde los primeros compases. En sus comienzos, en los albores de la década de los 90, sus discos eran comparados con los primeros de Kate Bush y Elton John. Pero Tori Amos pronto dejaría atrás esas influencias, que sin suponer ningún demérito menospreciaban la originalidad de sus composiciones. Y en la actualidad, tal como demuestra de nuevo Native Invader, la suya es una figura sin parangón situada al margen de cualquier moda musical, concentrada en el arte de escribir canciones perfectas, melodías difíciles de olvidar. Y estribillos que uno tararearía hasta el amanecer. © CM/Qobuz
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Pop - Publicado el 18 de diciembre de 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

Al principio de su carrera en solitario, Tori Amos se convirtió en una de las cantautoras más conocidas de su generación. Si bien fue Sarah McLachlan quien organizó la gira de Lilith Fair y codificó así a una generación entera de mujeres músicas (para bien o para mal), los primero álbumes de Amos marcaron el estilo. Intensamente personales, frívolos en cuanto a la letra y la interpretación, y narrados de un modo extraño, sus cuatro primeros álbumes fueron piedra de toque del rock alternativo de los 90. A Piano: The Collection es una visión ampliada y remasterizada de la carrera inicial en solitario de Amos, con mezclas alternativas, rarezas y otras sorpresas que dejan sin aliento a lo largo del estuche de cuatro discos. Imprescindible para los fans, el estuche es una introducción práctica para aquellos que han llegado a Tori Amos tan sólo a través de sus álbumes posteriores. © Charity Stafford /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 21 de septiembre de 1999 | Rhino Atlantic

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Pop/Rock - Publicado el 22 de febrero de 2005 | Epic

Released in conjunction with Tori Amos: Piece by Piece, a memoir presented as a think piece co-written with music journalist Ann Powers, Tori Amos' eighth studio album, The Beekeeper, is also loosely autobiographical, a song cycle that chronicles emotional journeys through metaphorical gardens all tended by the beekeeper protagonist of the title. Good thing that this concept was sketched out in the pre-release publicity, since The Beekeeper offers nothing close to a discernible concept in the album itself. At first, songs appear to spill forward in some sort of narrative, but the liner notes divide the 19 songs into six different groups -- "gardens," if you will -- that have nothing to do with how they're presented on the album, nor do they seem to have many sonic ties, and their lyrical connections are either tenuous or obtuse. Coming after 2002's Scarlet's Walk, whose title and songs clearly communicated its concept, this willful obtuseness might seem to hearken back to Tori's obstinately difficult albums of the mid-'90s, but The Beekeeper is miles away from the clanging darkness of Boys for Pele and From the Choirgirl Hotel. This is a bright, gleaming album that retains its sunny disposition even when the tempos grow slow and the melodies turn moody. Amos even occasionally punctuates her trademark elliptical piano ballads with organ-driven lite-funk -- a move that may alienate longtime fans, who may also balk at the album's highly polished sheen, but one that nevertheless fits well into the general feel of the record, lending it some genuine momentum. If the story line or concepts of the album aren't readily apparent, individual songs make their specific points well, and the record does flow with the grace and purpose of a song suite. As a cohesive work, The Beekeeper holds together better than nearly any of Tori's more ambitious albums, but there's a certain artsy distance that keeps this from being as emotionally immediate or as memorable as her first two records. But if Little Earthquakes was an album Amos could only have made in her twenties, The Beekeeper is a record perfectly suited for the singer/songwriter in her forties -- a little studied and deliberate, perhaps a shade too classy and consciously literary for its own good, but it's an ambitious, restless work that builds on her past work without resting on her laurels. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Publicado el 17 de noviembre de 2003 | Atlantic Records

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Pop - Publicado el 24 de abril de 1998 | Atlantic Records

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Pop/Rock - Publicado el 22 de febrero de 2005 | Epic

Released in conjunction with Tori Amos: Piece by Piece, a memoir presented as a think piece co-written with music journalist Ann Powers, Tori Amos' eighth studio album, The Beekeeper, is also loosely autobiographical, a song cycle that chronicles emotional journeys through metaphorical gardens all tended by the beekeeper protagonist of the title. Good thing that this concept was sketched out in the pre-release publicity, since The Beekeeper offers nothing close to a discernible concept in the album itself. At first, songs appear to spill forward in some sort of narrative, but the liner notes divide the 19 songs into six different groups -- "gardens," if you will -- that have nothing to do with how they're presented on the album, nor do they seem to have many sonic ties, and their lyrical connections are either tenuous or obtuse. Coming after 2002's Scarlet's Walk, whose title and songs clearly communicated its concept, this willful obtuseness might seem to hearken back to Tori's obstinately difficult albums of the mid-'90s, but The Beekeeper is miles away from the clanging darkness of Boys for Pele and From the Choirgirl Hotel. This is a bright, gleaming album that retains its sunny disposition even when the tempos grow slow and the melodies turn moody. Amos even occasionally punctuates her trademark elliptical piano ballads with organ-driven lite-funk -- a move that may alienate longtime fans, who may also balk at the album's highly polished sheen, but one that nevertheless fits well into the general feel of the record, lending it some genuine momentum. If the story line or concepts of the album aren't readily apparent, individual songs make their specific points well, and the record does flow with the grace and purpose of a song suite. As a cohesive work, The Beekeeper holds together better than nearly any of Tori's more ambitious albums, but there's a certain artsy distance that keeps this from being as emotionally immediate or as memorable as her first two records. But if Little Earthquakes was an album Amos could only have made in her twenties, The Beekeeper is a record perfectly suited for the singer/songwriter in her forties -- a little studied and deliberate, perhaps a shade too classy and consciously literary for its own good, but it's an ambitious, restless work that builds on her past work without resting on her laurels. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Publicado el 29 de octubre de 2002 | Epic

Perhaps Tori Amos didn't intentionally whittle her audience down to merely the rabidly devoted ever since Boys for Pele, but it sure seemed that way with the deliberately abstract arrangements, double albums, and cover records. That devoted cult may be all that pay attention to Scarlet's Walk, her first album for Epic, but it marks a return to the sound and feel of Under the Pink and is her best album since then. Much was made at the time of release about its concept -- conceived as a journey through modern womanhood, when Tori herself journeyed through each state in the union -- but following the narrative is secondary to the feel of the music, which is warm, melodic, and welcoming, never feeling labored as so much of her last four albums often did. This doesn't mean it's an altogether easy listen: an intensive listen reveals layers of pain and an uneasiness murmuring underneath the surface, but it's delivered reassuringly, in croons and lush arrangements that nevertheless are filled with quirks, making it both comforting and provocative. Which, of course, is what Tori Amos delivered in her early years. If this isn't as startling as Little Earthquakes or majestic as Under the Pink, so be it. It's confident, alluring, and accomplished, luring listeners in instead of daring them to follow. And, frankly, it's a relief that she finally delivered another record like that. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Ambientes - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2009 | Tori Amos - Republic Records