Su carrito está vacío

Categorías :

Artistas similares

Los álbumes

A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 1 de febrero de 1969 | A&M

Hi-Res
By 1969, Gram Parsons had already built the foundation of the country-rock movement through his work with the International Submarine Band and the Byrds, but his first album with the Flying Burrito Brothers, The Gilded Palace of Sin, was where he revealed the full extent of his talents, and it ranks among the finest and most influential albums the genre would ever produce. As a songwriter, Parsons delivered some of his finest work on this set; "Hot Burrito No. 1" and "Hot Burrito No. 2" both blend the hurt of classic country weepers with a contemporary sense of anger, jealousy, and confusion, and "Sin City" can either be seen as a parody or a sincere meditation on a city gone mad, and it hits home in both contexts. Parsons was rarely as strong as a vocalist as he was here, and his covers of "Dark End of the Street" and "Do Right Woman" prove just how much he had been learning from R&B as well as C&W. And Parsons was fortunate enough to be working with a band who truly added to his vision, rather than simply backing him up; the distorted swoops of Sneaky Pete Kleinow's fuzztone steel guitar provides a perfect bridge between country and psychedelic rock, and Chris Hillman's strong and supportive harmony vocals blend flawlessly with Parsons' (and he also proved to be a valuable songwriting partner, collaborating on a number of great tunes with Gram). While The Gilded Palace of Sin barely registered on the pop culture radar in 1969, literally dozens of bands (the Eagles most notable among them) would find inspiration in this music and enjoy far greater success. But no one ever brought rock and country together quite like the Flying Burrito Brothers, and this album remains their greatest accomplishment. © Mark Deming /TiVo
A partir de:
CD10,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 1 de febrero de 1969 | A&M

By 1969, Gram Parsons had already built the foundation of the country-rock movement through his work with the International Submarine Band and the Byrds, but his first album with the Flying Burrito Brothers, The Gilded Palace of Sin, was where he revealed the full extent of his talents, and it ranks among the finest and most influential albums the genre would ever produce. As a songwriter, Parsons delivered some of his finest work on this set; "Hot Burrito No. 1" and "Hot Burrito No. 2" both blend the hurt of classic country weepers with a contemporary sense of anger, jealousy, and confusion, and "Sin City" can either be seen as a parody or a sincere meditation on a city gone mad, and it hits home in both contexts. Parsons was rarely as strong as a vocalist as he was here, and his covers of "Dark End of the Street" and "Do Right Woman" prove just how much he had been learning from R&B as well as C&W. And Parsons was fortunate enough to be working with a band who truly added to his vision, rather than simply backing him up; the distorted swoops of Sneaky Pete Kleinow's fuzztone steel guitar provides a perfect bridge between country and psychedelic rock, and Chris Hillman's strong and supportive harmony vocals blend flawlessly with Parsons' (and he also proved to be a valuable songwriting partner, collaborating on a number of great tunes with Gram). While The Gilded Palace of Sin barely registered on the pop culture radar in 1969, literally dozens of bands (the Eagles most notable among them) would find inspiration in this music and enjoy far greater success. But no one ever brought rock and country together quite like the Flying Burrito Brothers, and this album remains their greatest accomplishment. © Mark Deming /TiVo
A partir de:
CD10,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 1 de abril de 1970 | A&M

Gram Parsons had a habit of taking over whatever band he happened to be working with, and on the first three albums on which he appeared -- the International Submarine Band's Safe at Home, the Byrds' Sweetheart of the Rodeo, and the Flying Burrito Brothers' The Gilded Palace of Sin -- he became the focal point, regardless of the talent of his compatriots. Burrito Deluxe, the Burritos' second album, is unique in Parsons' repertoire in that it's the only album where he seems to have deliberately stepped back to make more room for others; whether this was due to Gram's disinterest in a band he was soon to leave, or if he was simply in an unusually democratic frame of mind is a matter of debate. But while it is hardly a bad album, it's not nearly as striking as The Gilded Palace of Sin. Parsons didn't deliver many noteworthy originals for this set, with "Cody, Cody" and "Older Guys" faring best but paling next to the highlights from the previous album (though he was able to wrangle the song "Wild Horses" away from his buddy Keith Richards and record it a year before the Rolling Stones' version would surface). And while the band sounds tight and they play with genuine enthusiasm, there's a certain lack of focus in these performances; the band's frontman sounds as if his thoughts are often elsewhere, and the other players can't quite compensate for him, though on tunes like "God's Own Singer" and a cover of Bob Dylan's "If You Gotta Go," they gamely give it the old college try. Burrito Deluxe is certainly a better than average country-rock album, but coming from the band who made the genre's most strongly defining music, it's something of a disappointment. © Mark Deming /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Pop - Publicado el 1 de mayo de 1971 | A&M

Hi-Res
Following the somewhat disappointing Burrito Deluxe, Gram Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers parted ways, leaving the band -- especially co-founder Chris Hillman -- with a huge void to fill. Hillman needed not only a new songwriting partner, but also a strong singer to share the vocal duties. For its eponymous third album, the group decided on Rick Roberts, a singer/songwriter with a strong, clear tenor who had headed west after leaving college in South Carolina. It's apparent that Roberts owes more to the L.A. country and folk-rock that Hillman had been mining with the Byrds than to the traditional country influences that Parsons had brought to the original Burrito Brothers. And whereas Chris Hillman was great in a support role behind Parsons and during his days with the Byrds behind Roger McGuinn or Gene Clark, his role as co-leader with someone who lacks that sort of forceful personality only brings his weaknesses to the fore. On the previous two Burrito recordings, Hillman co-wrote much of the best material and helped Parsons to realize his vision of "cosmic American music." But here the sound is much closer to that which bandmate Bernie Leadon would go on to record a year later with the Eagles. And while tracks like Roberts' plaintive "Colorado," Gene Clark's "Tried So Hard," and the Hillman-Roberts collaboration "All Alone" are fine examples of the genre, there's little else on this album that truly lives up to the band's name. Much of what's lacking can be found in the performances, but even the most upbeat tunes lack any real oomph, while at times the singing can be less than compelling. The Flying Burrito Brothers is a solid if unspectacular country-rock record. © Brett Hartenbach /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES19,49 €
CD13,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 1 de abril de 1970 | A&M

Hi-Res
Gram Parsons had a habit of taking over whatever band he happened to be working with, and on the first three albums on which he appeared -- the International Submarine Band's Safe at Home, the Byrds' Sweetheart of the Rodeo, and the Flying Burrito Brothers' The Gilded Palace of Sin -- he became the focal point, regardless of the talent of his compatriots. Burrito Deluxe, the Burritos' second album, is unique in Parsons' repertoire in that it's the only album where he seems to have deliberately stepped back to make more room for others; whether this was due to Gram's disinterest in a band he was soon to leave, or if he was simply in an unusually democratic frame of mind is a matter of debate. But while it is hardly a bad album, it's not nearly as striking as The Gilded Palace of Sin. Parsons didn't deliver many noteworthy originals for this set, with "Cody, Cody" and "Older Guys" faring best but paling next to the highlights from the previous album (though he was able to wrangle the song "Wild Horses" away from his buddy Keith Richards and record it a year before the Rolling Stones' version would surface). And while the band sounds tight and they play with genuine enthusiasm, there's a certain lack of focus in these performances; the band's frontman sounds as if his thoughts are often elsewhere, and the other players can't quite compensate for him, though on tunes like "God's Own Singer" and a cover of Bob Dylan's "If You Gotta Go," they gamely give it the old college try. Burrito Deluxe is certainly a better than average country-rock album, but coming from the band who made the genre's most strongly defining music, it's something of a disappointment. © Mark Deming /TiVo
A partir de:
CD20,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 18 de abril de 2000 | A&M

A partir de:
CD17,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2002 | A&M

A partir de:
CD13,99 €

Country - Publicado el 4 de octubre de 1988 | A&M

A partir de:
CD9,99 €

Pop - Publicado el 1 de mayo de 1971 | A&M

Following the somewhat disappointing Burrito Deluxe, Gram Parsons and the Flying Burrito Brothers parted ways, leaving the band -- especially co-founder Chris Hillman -- with a huge void to fill. Hillman needed not only a new songwriting partner, but also a strong singer to share the vocal duties. For its eponymous third album, the group decided on Rick Roberts, a singer/songwriter with a strong, clear tenor who had headed west after leaving college in South Carolina. It's apparent that Roberts owes more to the L.A. country and folk-rock that Hillman had been mining with the Byrds than to the traditional country influences that Parsons had brought to the original Burrito Brothers. And whereas Chris Hillman was great in a support role behind Parsons and during his days with the Byrds behind Roger McGuinn or Gene Clark, his role as co-leader with someone who lacks that sort of forceful personality only brings his weaknesses to the fore. On the previous two Burrito recordings, Hillman co-wrote much of the best material and helped Parsons to realize his vision of "cosmic American music." But here the sound is much closer to that which bandmate Bernie Leadon would go on to record a year later with the Eagles. And while tracks like Roberts' plaintive "Colorado," Gene Clark's "Tried So Hard," and the Hillman-Roberts collaboration "All Alone" are fine examples of the genre, there's little else on this album that truly lives up to the band's name. Much of what's lacking can be found in the performances, but even the most upbeat tunes lack any real oomph, while at times the singing can be less than compelling. The Flying Burrito Brothers is a solid if unspectacular country-rock record. © Brett Hartenbach /TiVo
A partir de:
CD13,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1972 | A&M

A partir de:
CD12,49 €

Country - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2011 | Hip-O Select

A partir de:
CD9,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 12 de mayo de 2017 | Shady Grove

A partir de:
CD7,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 6 de mayo de 2020 | Smokin' Badger

A partir de:
CD4,99 €

Country - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2021 | Smokin' Badger

A partir de:
CD5,99 €

Country - Publicado el 20 de abril de 2018 | Sunset Blvd. Records

A partir de:
CD8,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 15 de diciembre de 2014 | Zip City

A partir de:
CD14,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 21 de agosto de 2019 | 3 Amigos

A partir de:
CD9,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 12 de noviembre de 2019 | BBM

A partir de:
CD14,99 €

Rock - Publicado el 21 de agosto de 2019 | Firefly