Su carrito está vacío

Categorías :

Artistas similares

Los álbumes

A partir de:
HI-RES11,99 €
CD8,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1957 | Contemporary

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz - Jazzwise Five-star review
Way Out West is a jazz essential, certainly as indispensable as its cover created by William Claxton. For Sonny Rollins, the album is a conglomerate of firsts. Recorded on March 7, 1957 in Los Angeles, the album is the first collaboration of Rollins with two other musical giants: Ray Brown on the bass and Shelly Manne on drums. Also for the first time, Rollins has not invited a piano player to his band and has begun exploring new, powerful solos with a simple rhythm section. His tenor saxophone’s sound is amazing and Brown and Manne are hardly reduced to simple stooges. The trio is working as one, subtle in its conversations and improvisations and powerful when the rhythms get tougher. When Way Out West came out a few years before the launching of Coltrane’s revolution, Sonny Rollins was the undisputed god of the sax kingdom.
A partir de:
HI-RES13,49 €
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1957 | Contemporary

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz - Jazzwise Five-star review
The timeless Way out West established Sonny Rollins as jazz's top tenor saxophonist (at least until John Coltrane surpassed him the following year). Joined by bassist Ray Brown and drummer Shelly Manne, Rollins is heard at one of his peaks on such pieces as "I'm an Old Cowhand (From the Rio Grande)," his own "Way out West," "There Is No Greater Love," and "Come, Gone" (a fast stomp based on "After You've Gone"). The William Claxton photo of Rollins wearing Western gear (and holding his tenor) in the desert is also a classic. [The Contemporary re-release appends three bonus tracks, all of them alternate takes.] © Scott Yanow /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES11,99 €
CD8,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1956 | Prestige

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
Sonny Rollins recorded many memorable sessions during 1954-1958, but Saxophone Colossus is arguably his finest all-around set. Joined by pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Max Roach, Rollins debuts and performs the definitive version of "St. Thomas," tears into the chord changes of "Mack the Knife" (here called "Moritat"), introduces "Strode Rode," is lyrical on "You Don't Know What Love Is," and constructs a solo on "Blue Seven" that practically defines his style. Essential music that, as with all of Rollins' Prestige recordings, has also been reissued as part of a huge "complete" box set; listeners with a tight budget are advised to pick up this single disc and be amazed. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES16,99 €
CD14,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1962 | RCA Bluebird

Hi-Res Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
Tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins' first recording after ending a surprising three-year retirement found the great saxophonist sounding very similar to how he had played in 1959, although he would soon start investigating freer forms. In a pianoless quartet with guitarist Jim Hall, bassist Bob Cranshaw, and drummer Ben Riley, Rollins explores four standards (including "Without a Song" and "God Bless the Child") plus two fiery originals, highlighted by the title cut. The interplay between Rollins and Hall is consistently impressive, making this set a near-classic and a very successful comeback. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES13,49 €
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1958 | Riverside

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
Max Roach on drums, Oscar Pettiford on the double bass and no pianist, like the year before in Way Out West: Sonny Rollins once again blows the wind of rebellion in this masterpiece recorded on February 11th and March 7th, 1958. From the start, the most popular tenor of that time lays down a theme of over 19 minutes: his album’s title, Freedom Suite! What a freedom suite indeed! Changing rhythms, unexpected escapades, freedom of tone and recurring themes never prevent the three men from conversing intensely. The listener must surrender himself to these high-flying exchanges, rather unprecedented at that time, let themselves be carried by this lava flow that is indeed extreme (never free), but never switches off from its melodic framework, or more precisely from its narration. Freedom Suite’s other great strength is to be the album of a true trio, rather than Rollins’ whim. Both Roach and Pettiford unfold stunning rhythm designs, beefing up the album’s inventiveness. With a record of this magnitude, Sonny Rollins shakes up the limits of jazz and cries out against segregation in late-50s America. He explains it in the sleeve’s notes: “America is deeply rooted in black culture. Its colloquialisms. Its humour. Its music. How ironic that Black people, who more than any other, claim America’s culture as their own, are in fact persecuted and repressed. That black people, who have exemplified humanity in their very existence, are being rewarded with inhumanity." © MZ/Qobuz
A partir de:
HI-RES9,99 €
CD6,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 26 de enero de 1966 | Verve Reissues

Hi-Res Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
Tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins loaned his flair for the dramatic to the score for the film Alfie, accompanying the story of what the liner notes describe as "the involuntary education of a hipster." Arranged by Oliver Nelson, the soundtrack follows the character's evolution from the carefree, rakish Lothario of "Alfie's Theme" to the contemplative, somewhat broken man reflected in "Alfie's Theme Differently." Rollins attempts to capture the textures of life through his incisive and energetic playing, his coherent improvisations, and variations on musical themes. While "Alfie's Theme" and its variants make the most lasting impression, "He's Younger Than You Are" is touching, laced with regret. And the sensual, relaxed "On Impulse" has a nice sense of immediacy. © Rovi Staff /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1956 | Prestige

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
At a time when he was a member of the legendary Clifford Brown/Max Roach sextet, Sonny Rollins was still the apple fallen not too far from the tree of Miles Davis. Tenor Madness was the recording that, once and for all, established Newk as one of the premier tenor saxophonists, an accolade that in retrospect, has continued through six full decades and gives an indication why a young Rollins was so well liked, as his fluency, whimsical nature, and solid construct of melodies and solos gave him the title of the next Coleman Hawkins or Lester Young of mainstream jazz. With the team of pianist Red Garland, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Philly Joe Jones, staples of that era's Miles Davis combos, Rollins has all the rhythmic ammunition to cut loose, be free, and extrapolate on themes as only he could, and still can. This is most evident on his version of "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World," started in its normal choppy waltz time, followed by a sax/drums prelude, a drum solo from Jones, and steamed from there on in, a hot 4/4 romp. Garland is particularly outstanding for keeping up the pace, depth and placement on this one. A bluesy version of "When Your Lover Has Gone," again enlivened by Jones, and the legendary title track with Rollins and John Coltrane trading long solos, and fours with Jones, are tunes that in the mid-'50s defined the parlance "blowing session." "Paul's Pal," in tribute to Chambers, has become a standard in its own right with a bright, memorable melody showing the good humor of Rollins, especially on the second time through, while the saxophonist's ability to sing vocal like tones through his horn is no better evinced as during the light ballad "My Reverie." A recording that should stand proudly alongside Saxophone Colossus as some of the best work of Sonny Rollins in his early years, it's also a testament to the validity, vibrancy, and depth of modern jazz in the post-World War era. It belongs on everybody's shelf. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES28,99 €
CD20,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2013 | Blue Note Records

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Hi-Res Audio
A partir de:
HI-RES13,49 €
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1957 | Contemporary

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
The timeless Way out West established Sonny Rollins as jazz's top tenor saxophonist (at least until John Coltrane surpassed him the following year). Joined by bassist Ray Brown and drummer Shelly Manne, Rollins is heard at one of his peaks on such pieces as "I'm an Old Cowhand (From the Rio Grande)," his own "Way out West," "There Is No Greater Love," and "Come, Gone" (a fast stomp based on "After You've Gone"). The William Claxton photo of Rollins wearing Western gear (and holding his tenor) in the desert is also a classic. [The Contemporary re-release appends three bonus tracks, all of them alternate takes.] © Scott Yanow /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Premios Hi-Res Audio
A partir de:
HI-RES9,99 €
CD6,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 16 de diciembre de 1956 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Premios Hi-Res Audio
After several incredible dates for Prestige, Rollins moved over to Blue Note to cut a series of studio and live recordings; while not as groundbreaking as his earlier work, the albums still stand out among the many hard bop releases of the day. Upon listening to this, his fine debut for the label, not to mention classics like Saxophone Colossus and Sonny Rollins Plus Four, one almost takes for granted the tenor giant's ability to reel off a nonstop flow of breathtaking solo lines while keeping an overall thematic structure intact. And even though it's not as classic sounding as other Blue Note titles like Vol. 2 or Newk's Time, Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 will satisfy Rollins fans comfortable with a mostly loose and free-flowing set; the hard-swinging originals "Bluesnote" and "Sonnysphere" certainly fit the bill, while the loping blues "Decision" and easy swinger "Plain Jane" up the ante with fetching head statements. Topping things off, Rollins includes one of his singular Broadway song interpretations with the Finian's Rainbow ballad "How Are Things in Glocca Mora." Figuring prominently in the proceedings are veteran bassist Gene Ramey, longtime drummer Max Roach, and then up-and-coming hard bop stars trumpeter Donald Byrd and pianist Wynton Kelly. Maybe not a first-choice disc for Rollins newcomers, but certainly an essential title down the line. [Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 was reissued in 2003, newly remastered in 24-bit, as part of Blue Note's acclaimed Rudy VanGelder reissue series.] © Stephen Cook & Al Campbell /TiVo
A partir de:
CD12,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1956 | Prestige

Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
Sonny Rollins recorded many memorable sessions during 1954-1958, but Saxophone Colossus is arguably his finest all-around set. Joined by pianist Tommy Flanagan, bassist Doug Watkins, and drummer Max Roach, Rollins debuts and performs the definitive version of "St. Thomas," tears into the chord changes of "Mack the Knife" (here called "Moritat"), introduces "Strode Rode," is lyrical on "You Don't Know What Love Is," and constructs a solo on "Blue Seven" that practically defines his style. Essential music that, as with all of Rollins' Prestige recordings, has also been reissued as part of a huge "complete" box set; listeners with a tight budget are advised to pick up this single disc and be amazed. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 16 de diciembre de 1956 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Premios Hi-Res Audio
After several incredible dates for Prestige, Rollins moved over to Blue Note to cut a series of studio and live recordings; while not as groundbreaking as his earlier work, the albums still stand out among the many hard bop releases of the day. Upon listening to this, his fine debut for the label, not to mention classics like Saxophone Colossus and Sonny Rollins Plus Four, one almost takes for granted the tenor giant's ability to reel off a nonstop flow of breathtaking solo lines while keeping an overall thematic structure intact. And even though it's not as classic sounding as other Blue Note titles like Vol. 2 or Newk's Time, Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 will satisfy Rollins fans comfortable with a mostly loose and free-flowing set; the hard-swinging originals "Bluesnote" and "Sonnysphere" certainly fit the bill, while the loping blues "Decision" and easy swinger "Plain Jane" up the ante with fetching head statements. Topping things off, Rollins includes one of his singular Broadway song interpretations with the Finian's Rainbow ballad "How Are Things in Glocca Mora." Figuring prominently in the proceedings are veteran bassist Gene Ramey, longtime drummer Max Roach, and then up-and-coming hard bop stars trumpeter Donald Byrd and pianist Wynton Kelly. Maybe not a first-choice disc for Rollins newcomers, but certainly an essential title down the line. [Sonny Rollins, Vol. 1 was reissued in 2003, newly remastered in 24-bit, as part of Blue Note's acclaimed Rudy VanGelder reissue series.] © Stephen Cook & Al Campbell /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES16,99 €
CD14,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 2 de mayo de 2014 | Okeh

Hi-Res Libreto Premios 4F de Télérama
A partir de:
HI-RES17,49 €
CD12,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Premios Hi-Res Audio
A partir de:
CD12,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2008 | Milestone

Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz
A partir de:
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1959 | Rhino Atlantic

The second volume of the Modern Jazz Quartet at the Music Inn was released in 1959, a year after its historic first volume with guest Jimmy Giuffre. The format on this set is similar, with pianist John Lewis, vibraphonist Milt Jackson, bassist Percy Heath, and drummer Connie Kay moving through a gorgeous medley of standards to open including "Stardust," "I Can't Get Started," and "Lover Man," with beautiful and clever counterpoint between Lewis and Jackson on the melody lines. There are two of Lewis' originals here as well. The first is the wry, spare "Midsömmer" that begins atmospherically, with sparse lines played by Jackson that reverberate as Heath's bowed bass underscores them. When Lewis enters, the melody unfolds tenderly and thoughtfully. It's a ballad of tension and textures. Lewis' penchant for classical architecture permeates the tune, though it swings gently as well, with Kay's brushed cymbals and gracefully caressed hi hat. "Festival "Sketch," at a little over three-and-a-half minutes, takes a counterpoint melody and generates a skittering swing tune out of it. As on the previous volume, the Modern Jazz Quartet are joined by a guest for the final two cuts; ace saxophonist Sonny Rollins digs in on both the classic "Bags Groove," composed by Jackson, and Dizzy Gillespie's bebop anthem "Night in Tunisia." Both tunes are rooted in blues grooves. Rollins understands the MJQ's use of tension and dynamics beautifully. His big, warm tone above Lewis and Jackson on the former is sweet, relaxed, and in-the-pocket. On the latter, the knotty melodic frame is played a little slower, but is a tough fingerpopper nonetheless, with Rollins playing accents in the opening vamps and the just gliding into his big bluesy solo. This is a welcome addition to volume one, and a larger study in contrasts given Rollins propensity to really blow, as opposed Giuffre's lower key approach on the first volume. To say that this set works is an understatement. It is a highlight of the group's storied career on Atlantic. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
A partir de:
HI-RES15,49 €
CD10,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1956 | Prestige

Hi-Res Libreto
A partir de:
CD14,49 €

Jazz - Publicado el 30 de octubre de 1986 | Legacy Recordings

A partir de:
CD4,99 €

Jazz - Publicado el 9 de febrero de 2016 | Shami Media Group 3