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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2011 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Premios 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music - Sélection Les Inrocks - Stereophile: Record To Die For - Mercury Prize Winner
Luego de la colección de baladas sombrías White Chalk, P.J. Harvey regresa con Let England Shake, un grupo de canciones tan diferentes del trabajo precedente que lo único que comparten es su naturaleza profundamente británica. Las espectrales baladas de piano de White Chalk parecían emanar de la casa de un pastor protestante en algún páramo desolado, mientras que aquí Harvey examina su relación con su patria a través de canciones que tratan sobre la guerra. No obstante la osadía de su concepto y contexto, Let England Shake contiene algunas de las músicas más serenas de Harvey. Ella continúa cantando en el registro alto empleado en White Chalk, que tanto dividiera a sus fans, pero atenuado aquí por una producción etérea y arreglos eclécticos, que a veces llegan incluso a disimular la inmensa rabia y dolor que muchas de estas canciones contienen. Todas estas paradojas lo convierten en uno de los trabajos de Harvey más ingeniosamente elaborados. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2000 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz - Mercury Prize Winner
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1995 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz - Mercury Prize Selection
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1993 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 15 de abril de 2016 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Premios 4F de Télérama
The Hope Six demolition project, el esperado álbum de 2016 de Polly Jean Harvey, comparte el fuerte carácter político de su aclamado predecesor Let England shake. Grabado en parte en el centro cultural londinense Somerset House, el disco toma su nombre de un departamento norteamericano de desarrollo urbano y está inspirado en los recientes viajes de Harvey por Kosovo, Afganistán y Washington D.C. Canciones como "The wheel" o "The community of hope" reflejan el creciente interés de Harvey por temáticas de urgente actualidad global. © TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 29 de enero de 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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On Is This Desire?, PJ Harvey challenged expectations with her most daring production choices yet -- which is saying something, given the abrasive sound of her breakthrough Rid of Me. Working once again with To Bring You My Love collaborator Flood, she went all in on that album's industrial and electronic flirtations, giving her rock a chrome-plated edge and surrounding her desolate ballads in atmospheres that echoed Tricky and Portishead. As Is This Desire? The Demos reveals, Harvey's initial sketches for the album were even more polarized in their dynamics and moods. The seething electronics on "Joy" are still startling in the low-res form they take here, while "The Wind"'s layered whispers are even softer, albeit less distant, than in their final incarnation. Though some of these recordings understandably feel unfinished, others gain surprising depth from a simpler approach. The tinny trip-hop beat and Harvey's raw vocals on "Angelene" have an appealing nakedness, but the demo of "My Beautiful Leah" shows the song needed the full studio treatment to become the industrial rock dirge it was meant to be. "The River" remains hauntingly beautiful with a few synths hinting at the scale of its final form; similarly, "The Sky Lit Up" remains electrifying stripped of its spacey keyboards. On the demo of "Is This Desire?," Harvey's voice is closer and more magnetic, underscoring that it would have been a highlight on any of her albums. As with her previous collections of demos, Is This Desire? The Demos unearths connections within her body of work. Filled with dark, grinding distortion, this version of "A Perfect Day Elise" emphasizes its links to To Bring You My Love tracks like "Down by the Water" and "Meet Ze Monsta." Likewise, Harvey's bruised soprano and the subdued melody of "The Garden" foreshadow White Chalk and Let England Shake, where she proved beyond a doubt that her hushed confessions could be just as compelling as her head-on confrontations. Starker yet somehow more fully formed than some of her other demo albums, Is This Desire? The Demos is an illuminating listen. Fans who were initially perplexed by Is This Desire?'s chilly aesthetic just might gain a fuller appreciation of the album through these versions of its songs -- and as always, it's fascinating to hear Harvey's original concepts. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 26 de febrero de 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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By the time of 2000's Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, PJ Harvey was still finding ways to reinvent her music. While the album's sonics were even smoother than on Is This Desire?, Harvey traded her previous record's moody character studies for direct songwriting that feels even more genuine on Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea: The Demos. As on her previous collections of sketches, Harvey's strategies for her songs are clearly mapped out. Aside from the trip-hop-tinged beats on "A Place for Us" and "We Float," there are few drastic differences from the demos to the finished versions, but even when the instrumentation is as simple as Harvey and her guitar, it never feels like anything is missing. This raw minimalism heightens the songs' intimacy, particularly on "This Mess We're In," where Harvey sings alone instead of being joined by Thom Yorke, and on the somber sensuality of "Beautiful Feeling." Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea's undercurrent of happiness -- one of its most surprising but welcome artistic choices -- jumps out loud and clear on a throaty rendition of "Good Fortune" and an emphatic "This Is Love." As demos, the album's rockers feel lean and unencumbered: Harvey's spine-tingling wails and fuzzed-out guitar have all the crackling immediacy of a live performance on "The Whores Hustle and the Hustlers Whore." Elsewhere, tributes to the power of New York City like "Big Exit" and "Kamikaze" pay homage to Patti Smith and hint at the energy that was about to burst forth from acts like the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. While Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea's glossy rock and straightforward ballads were different than anything else in Harvey's body of work, the album's demos remain consistently entertaining for fans who want to hear her music come into being. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 11 de septiembre de 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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As all of her demos show, PJ Harvey has a definite vision for each of her albums by the time she commits her songs to tape. With 1995's To Bring You My Love, she expanded her sound dramatically, fleshing out the bones of her music with lush instrumentation such as keyboards and strings. On To Bring You My Love: The Demos, how she gets the ideas across for this lavish-sounding album with relatively limited resources makes for fascinating listening. Obviously, these versions are much rawer than the final product Harvey crafted in the studio with Flood and John Parish. The demo of "Down by the Water," the album's quintessential track, is a stylized miniature of the finished version, thanks to the stiff, tinny beats and canned organ sounds of the secondhand Yamaha keyboard Harvey used to write the album. Nevertheless, this song and the rest of To Bring You My Love: The Demos sizzles with the potential she fulfilled in the studio with the rest of her creative team. They also reveal different connections to the rest of her body of work: This incarnation of "C'mon Billy" sounds like it could have appeared on Dry, and once again the Yamaha's synth strings and beats lend a very different color to the song compared to the live string section and percussion of the studio version. Several other acoustic-based songs are highlights, such as the fiery takes on "Send His Love to Me" and "The Dancer," which leans into the song's flamenco influences and feels notably looser than the rendition on To Bring You My Love. Elsewhere, the brash, lo-fi version of "Meet Ze Monsta" recalls 4-Track Demos, while the serrated guitar din of the "Long Snake Moan" demo suggests that it could have fit in on Rid of Me. As always, Harvey's voice sounds fantastic, particularly on "Teclo," where her lower register and startling vibrato reflect the mix of genuine, deeply felt emotion and theatrical presentation that extends to all of To Bring You My Love. Since so much of the album's power resides in its stunning production, this set might be slightly less revelatory than some of Harvey's other demo albums. Nevertheless, die-hard fans will savor the glimpse into her creative process that To Bring You My Love: The Demos provides. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2007 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

En White Chalk se hacen sentir las influencias del folk británico, lleno de horror y amor de carácter gótico, y casi imposible de borrar de la mente. También es uno de los más hermosos discos de PJ Harvey, inspirado por la fragilidad y la atemporalidad de las líneas trazadas con tiza y lo reciente de su incursión en el piano, que domina el disco, lo que da a "Before Departure" una densidad como de funeral y a "Grow Grow Grow" un brillo embrujado. No obstante, lo más cautivador del disco es la voz de Harvey: canta en un tono agudo a medio camino entre un susurro y un quejido. En estas canciones, hermosas y casi insoportables de tan íntimas, la oscuridad es un aliado, el silencio un enemigo y un piano es un esqueleto con los dientes rotos y lenguas rojas temblorosas. White Chalk puede provocar que los oyentes tiriten aun en un día soleado. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1998 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 24 de julio de 2020 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Rock - Publicado el 31 de mayo de 2004 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

Even though she's not quite as overt about it as Madonna or David Bowie, PJ Harvey remains one of rock's expert chameleons. Her ever-changing sound keeps her music open to interpretation, and her seventh album, Uh Huh Her, is no different in that it departs from what came before it. Uh Huh Her -- a title that can be pronounced and interpreted as an affirmation, a gasp, a sigh, or a laugh -- is, as Harvey promised, darker and rawer than the manicured Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea. That album was a bid for the mainstream that Harvey said she made just to see if she could; this album sounds like she made it because she had to. However, despite the playful tantrum "Who the Fuck?" and the noisy mix of pent-up erotic longing and frustration that is "The Letter," Uh Huh Her isn't the Rid of Me redux that one might envision as a reaction to the previous album's gloss. Instead, Harvey uses some of each of the sounds and ideas that she has explored throughout her career. The gallery of self-portraits, juxtaposed with snippets of Harvey's notebooks, gracing Uh Huh Her's liner notes underscores the feeling of culmination and moving forward. The results aren't exactly predictable, though, and that's part of what makes songs like "The Life and Death of Mr. Badmouth" interesting. Earlier in Harvey's career, a track like this probably would have exploded in feral fury, but here it simmers with a crawling tension, switching atmospheric keyboards for searing guitars. Indeed, keyboards and odd instrumental flourishes abound on Uh Huh Her, making it the most sonically interesting PJ Harvey album since Is This Desire? Lyrically, heartache, sex, and feminine roles are still Harvey's bread and butter, but she manages to find something new in these themes each time she returns to them. "Pocket Knife" is an especially striking example: a beautifully creepy murder ballad, the song conjures images of hidden feminine power -- a pocketknife concealed by a wedding dress -- as well as lyrics like "I'm not trying to cause a fuss/I just wanna make my own fuck-ups." "You Come Through," meanwhile, is nearly as direct and vulnerable as anything that appeared on Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea. Uh Huh Her isn't perfect; the track listing feels top-loaded, some of the later songs, such as "Cat on the Wall" and "It's You" come close to sounding like generic PJ Harvey (if such a thing is possible), and the minute-long track of crying seagulls is either a distraction or a palate cleanser, depending on your outlook. Still, Uh Huh Her does so many things right, like the gorgeous, Latin-tinged "Shame" and the stripped-down beauty of "The Desperate Kingdom of Love" (one of a handful of short, glimpse-like songs that give the album an organic ebb and flow), that its occasional stumbles are worth overlooking. Perhaps the most nuanced album in PJ Harvey's body of work, Uh Huh Her balances her bold and vulnerable moments, but remains vital. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 30 de abril de 2021 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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After the meticulously crafted Is This Desire? and Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, PJ Harvey opted for a more spontaneous sound on 2004's Uh Huh Her, an approach that's even more evident on Uh Huh Her: The Demos. At nine songs long, this is a smaller collection than some of her previous demo collections -- true to Harvey's goal, several Uh Huh Her tracks were written while recording -- but many of the album's finest moments are present and accounted for. Chief among them is "Shame," which is just as stunning in this minimalist version that showcases her spellbinding songwriting and singing (at one point, she almost sobs the chorus) as it was on the finished album. Interestingly, several of these sketches sound more like typical demos than Harvey's initial recordings for her other albums. They're not sloppy, but they give the impression that she got the songs down on tape just well enough to use as a starting point. Her vocals are deep in the red on "The Life and Death of Mr. Bigmouth," and the cheap, hissy drum machine backing her outbursts on "Who the Fuck?" brings out the playfulness behind the song's catharsis. These looser performances reflect how fundamental not overworking or overthinking her ideas was to Uh Huh Her's creative process, especially since this was the first album Harvey produced on her own since 1993's 4-Track Demos. And while the album's louder tracks remain highlights on Uh Huh Her: The Demos -- the sensuality of "The Letter" and "It's You" sounds even more uninhibited -- its quieter songs also hold their own. The beautiful Western ballad "The Desperate Kingdom of Love" shines in its simplicity here, while stripped-down renditions of "The Slow Drug" and "The Pocket Knife" reveal their respective ties to Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea and White Chalk. Filled with details and connections that will fascinate die-hard fans and recording geeks, Uh Huh Her: The Demos is just as compelling as the larger volumes in Harvey's archival demos series, and makes a case that Uh Huh Her is one of the more underappreciated albums in her discography. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 24 de septiembre de 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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When White Chalk was released, it provided another surprise for PJ Harvey fans. Its sparse, spectral songs were a far cry from the snarling rock and electronic experiments that came before them, and somehow White Chalk: The Demos is even wispier and more ephemeral. Often, it seems like Harvey might not have needed as many as four tracks to sketch the album's incantations and mood pieces. These recordings are dominated by her uncanny soprano vocals and piano with the occasional backing vocal or flute-like keyboard floating by; the most notable embellishment is the echo she uses to wonderfully ghostly effect on the title track. If White Chalk: The Demos is missing some of the studio magic that Harvey concocted with longtime collaborators Flood, John Parish, and Eric Drew Feldman, the collection makes up for it in intimacy. Being close enough to Harvey to hear her press the piano's pedals heightens the feeling that she recorded these songs in a haunted drawing room filled with flickering candlelight. More so than on the finished album, "Dear Darkness" resembles a whispered prayer; "Grow Grow Grow" becomes a seance; and "Broken Harp"'s atonal anguish takes on a field recording-like rawness. Stripping away some of White Chalk's atmosphere underscores just how good the bones of its songs are. Without as many sounds surrounding them, the album's tales of mortality, betrayal, and isolation often feel more present, whether they're plaintive moments like "When Under Ether" and "To Talk to You" or the intense foreboding of "The Mountain." As with Harvey's other demo collections, the primeval form of White Chalk makes the ties between her albums more apparent. It's easier to hear how some of the spookier moments of Uh Huh Her and Is This Desire (as well as the mythical storytelling of Dry and To Bring You My Love) relate to these songs, and in turn, how White Chalk's dreamy Englishness foreshadowed how she explored her complex relationship with her homeland to great acclaim on Let England Shake. While the distinctions between the studio and demo versions of White Chalk are often subtle, the nuances in mood and meaning make for gripping listening. White Chalk: The Demos may cast a different spell than the finished album, but it once again makes a strong case for hearing Harvey's songs in the raw -- and for her ability to take her art in so many various yet cohesive directions. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Dry

Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 2 de marzo de 1992 | Too Pure

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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2006 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2009 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Alternativa & Indie - Publicado el 24 de septiembre de 2007 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

When White Chalk was released, it provided another surprise for PJ Harvey fans. Its sparse, spectral songs were a far cry from the snarling rock and electronic experiments that came before them, and somehow White Chalk: The Demos is even wispier and more ephemeral. Often, it seems like Harvey might not have needed as many as four tracks to sketch the album's incantations and mood pieces. These recordings are dominated by her uncanny soprano vocals and piano with the occasional backing vocal or flute-like keyboard floating by; the most notable embellishment is the echo she uses to wonderfully ghostly effect on the title track. If White Chalk: The Demos is missing some of the studio magic that Harvey concocted with longtime collaborators Flood, John Parish, and Eric Drew Feldman, the collection makes up for it in intimacy. Being close enough to Harvey to hear her press the piano's pedals heightens the feeling that she recorded these songs in a haunted drawing room filled with flickering candlelight. More so than on the finished album, "Dear Darkness" resembles a whispered prayer; "Grow Grow Grow" becomes a seance; and "Broken Harp"'s atonal anguish takes on a field recording-like rawness. Stripping away some of White Chalk's atmosphere underscores just how good the bones of its songs are. Without as many sounds surrounding them, the album's tales of mortality, betrayal, and isolation often feel more present, whether they're plaintive moments like "When Under Ether" and "To Talk to You" or the intense foreboding of "The Mountain." As with Harvey's other demo collections, the primeval form of White Chalk makes the ties between her albums more apparent. It's easier to hear how some of the spookier moments of Uh Huh Her and Is This Desire (as well as the mythical storytelling of Dry and To Bring You My Love) relate to these songs, and in turn, how White Chalk's dreamy Englishness foreshadowed how she explored her complex relationship with her homeland to great acclaim on Let England Shake. While the distinctions between the studio and demo versions of White Chalk are often subtle, the nuances in mood and meaning make for gripping listening. White Chalk: The Demos may cast a different spell than the finished album, but it once again makes a strong case for hearing Harvey's songs in the raw -- and for her ability to take her art in so many various yet cohesive directions. © Heather Phares /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1993 | Universal-Island Records Ltd.

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Bandas sonoras de cine - Publicado el 12 de abril de 2019 | INVADA Records