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Rock - Publicado el 1 de septiembre de 1973 | Geffen

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The Allman Brothers came first, but Lynyrd Skynyrd epitomized Southern rock. The Allmans were exceptionally gifted musicians, as much bluesmen as rockers. Skynyrd was nothing but rockers, and they were Southern rockers to the bone. This didn't just mean that they were rednecks, but that they brought it all together -- the blues, country, garage rock, Southern poetry -- in a way that sounded more like the South than even the Allmans. And a large portion of that derives from their hard, lean edge, which was nowhere more apparent than on their debut album, Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd. Produced by Al Kooper, there are few records that sound this raw and uncompromising, especially records by debut bands. Then again, few bands sound this confident and fully formed with their first record. Perhaps the record is stronger because it's only eight songs, so there isn't a wasted moment, but that doesn't discount the sheer strength of each song. Consider the opening juxtaposition of the rollicking "I Ain't the One" with the heartbreaking "Tuesday's Gone." Two songs couldn't be more opposed, yet Skynyrd sounds equally convincing on both. If that's all the record did, it would still be fondly regarded, but it wouldn't have been influential. The genius of Skynyrd is that they un-self-consciously blended album-oriented hard rock, blues, country, and garage rock, turning it all into a distinctive sound that sounds familiar but thoroughly unique. On top of that, there's the highly individual voice of Ronnie Van Zant, a songwriter who isn't afraid to be nakedly sentimental, spin tales of the South, or to twist macho conventions with humor. And, lest we forget, while he does this, the band rocks like a motherf*cker. It's the birth of a great band that birthed an entire genre with this album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2001 | Geffen*

Premios Discoteca Ideal Qobuz - Stereophile: Record To Die For
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de abril de 1974 | Geffen

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Lynyrd Skynyrd wrote the book on Southern rock with their first album, so it only made sense that they followed it for their second album, aptly titled Second Helping. Sticking with producer Al Kooper (who, after all, discovered them), the group turned out a record that replicated all the strengths of the original, but was a little tighter and a little more professional. It also revealed that the band, under the direction of songwriter Ronnie Van Zant, was developing a truly original voice. Of course, the band had already developed their own musical voice, but it was enhanced considerably by Van Zant's writing, which was at turns plainly poetic, surprisingly clever, and always revealing. Though Second Helping isn't as hard a rock record as Pronounced, it's the songs that make the record. "Sweet Home Alabama" became ubiquitous, yet it's rivaled by such terrific songs as the snide, punkish "Workin' for MCA," the Southern groove of "Don't Ask Me No Questions," the affecting "The Ballad of Curtis Loew," and "The Needle and the Spoon," a drug tale as affecting as their rival Neil Young's "Needle and the Damage Done," but much harder rocking. This is the part of Skynyrd that most people forget -- they were a great band, but they were indelible because that was married to great writing. And nowhere was that more evident than on Second Helping. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 21 de agosto de 2012 | Roadrunner Records - Loud & Proud

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Rock - Publicado el 24 de marzo de 1975 | Geffen

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Rock - Publicado el 21 de agosto de 2012 | Roadrunner Records - Loud & Proud

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Rock - Publicado el 1 de septiembre de 1973 | Geffen

Hi-Res
The Allman Brothers came first, but Lynyrd Skynyrd epitomized Southern rock. The Allmans were exceptionally gifted musicians, as much bluesmen as rockers. Skynyrd was nothing but rockers, and they were Southern rockers to the bone. This didn't just mean that they were rednecks, but that they brought it all together -- the blues, country, garage rock, Southern poetry -- in a way that sounded more like the South than even the Allmans. And a large portion of that derives from their hard, lean edge, which was nowhere more apparent than on their debut album, Pronounced Leh-Nerd Skin-Nerd. Produced by Al Kooper, there are few records that sound this raw and uncompromising, especially records by debut bands. Then again, few bands sound this confident and fully formed with their first record. Perhaps the record is stronger because it's only eight songs, so there isn't a wasted moment, but that doesn't discount the sheer strength of each song. Consider the opening juxtaposition of the rollicking "I Ain't the One" with the heartbreaking "Tuesday's Gone." Two songs couldn't be more opposed, yet Skynyrd sounds equally convincing on both. If that's all the record did, it would still be fondly regarded, but it wouldn't have been influential. The genius of Skynyrd is that they un-self-consciously blended album-oriented hard rock, blues, country, and garage rock, turning it all into a distinctive sound that sounds familiar but thoroughly unique. On top of that, there's the highly individual voice of Ronnie Van Zant, a songwriter who isn't afraid to be nakedly sentimental, spin tales of the South, or to twist macho conventions with humor. And, lest we forget, while he does this, the band rocks like a motherf*cker. It's the birth of a great band that birthed an entire genre with this album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de abril de 1974 | Geffen

Hi-Res
Lynyrd Skynyrd wrote the book on Southern rock with their first album, so it only made sense that they followed it for their second album, aptly titled Second Helping. Sticking with producer Al Kooper (who, after all, discovered them), the group turned out a record that replicated all the strengths of the original, but was a little tighter and a little more professional. It also revealed that the band, under the direction of songwriter Ronnie Van Zant, was developing a truly original voice. Of course, the band had already developed their own musical voice, but it was enhanced considerably by Van Zant's writing, which was at turns plainly poetic, surprisingly clever, and always revealing. Though Second Helping isn't as hard a rock record as Pronounced, it's the songs that make the record. "Sweet Home Alabama" became ubiquitous, yet it's rivaled by such terrific songs as the snide, punkish "Workin' for MCA," the Southern groove of "Don't Ask Me No Questions," the affecting "The Ballad of Curtis Loew," and "The Needle and the Spoon," a drug tale as affecting as their rival Neil Young's "Needle and the Damage Done," but much harder rocking. This is the part of Skynyrd that most people forget -- they were a great band, but they were indelible because that was married to great writing. And nowhere was that more evident than on Second Helping. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 24 de marzo de 1975 | Geffen

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Rock - Publicado el 13 de septiembre de 1976 | Geffen*

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Rock - Publicado el 25 de agosto de 1998 | Geffen

La compilación de Lynyrd Skynyrd de 1998 The Essential sigue en casi todo la misma configuración de su colección de 1979, Gold and Platinum, los dos discos reúnen las mejores canciones que Skynyrd grabó durante su producción original de 1973-1977. Pero lo que hace diferente a las dos colecciones es la incorporación de varias piezas poco comunes: versiones demo de "Four Walls of Raiford" y "Comin' Home", así como una versión unplugged de "All I Can Do Is Write About It". Si se añaden a esto los clásicos de Skynyrd como "Sweet Home Alabama", "Gimme Three Steps", "What's Your Name", "Whiskey Rock-A-Roller", "Freebird" y "Tuesday's Gone", se obtiene otra visión general de la sólida carrera de estos co-fundadores del rock sureño. © TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 17 de octubre de 1977 | Geffen

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Rock - Publicado el 13 de noviembre de 1994 | Volcano

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Rock - Publicado el 17 de octubre de 1977 | Geffen

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Rock - Publicado el 2 de febrero de 1976 | Geffen

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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1999 | Geffen*

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Pop - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1997 | Geffen*

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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 1998 | Geffen*

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Rock - Publicado el 1 de abril de 1989 | Geffen

Skynyrd's Innyrds: Their Greatest Hits comes close to being a solid single-disc overview of the Southern rockers' biggest hits, but it falls short in a number of important ways. Most notably, "Free Bird" is not in either its studio or live incarnations; it's presented as an outtake, something that will only be of interest to hardcore Lynyrd Skynyrd fans, just like the outtake of "Double Trouble." Also, several major songs -- "Down South Jukin'," "You Got That Right," "Whiskey Rock-a-Roller," "Simple Man," "Tuesday's Gone," "I Know a Little" -- are missing, with album cuts in their place. That said, it has most of the big hits -- "Sweet Home Alabama," "Gimme Three Steps," "Saturday Night Special," "What's Your Name," "That Smell," plus "Workin' for MCA" and "Call Me the Breeze," which were not on Gold & Platinum -- which is enough to make it a good sampler, even if it doesn't provide as complete an introduction as Gold & Platinum. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 24 de julio de 2015 | Loud & Proud Records

Capturing a tribute concert held on November 12, 2014 at the Fox Theatre in Atlanta, Georgia, the double-disc One More for the Fans is studded with Southern rock stars, along with a bunch of country acts, bluesmen, Cheap Trick, and John Hiatt. The whole thing culminated with Skynyrd coming out for the close -- the headlines came from Johnny Van Zant duetting with footage of a departed Ronnie on the big screen but the closing "Free Bird" and "Sweet Home Alabama" worked better -- but this is best heard as a ragged tribute by acts that either play it straight or enjoy getting a little rowdy with the legacy. Jamey Johnson picks an obscurity in "Four Walls of Raiford" but this pretty much consists of the basic canon, which is by no means a complaint, particularly when Randy Houser tears into "Whiskey Rock-A-Roller," Blackberry Smoke beefs up "Workin' for MCA," and Jason Isbell swings on "I Know a Little." Maybe this isn't a flat-out classic but anybody who's enjoyed Skynyrd over the years will find something to enjoy here. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo