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Clásica - Publicado el 4 de noviembre de 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
The Georgian-German violinist Lisa Batiashvili has quietly reached the point of being one of the cognoscenti's players in mainstream repertory, with a free-spirited manner married to formidable technique in such a way as to bring to mind the greats of the past. Here she has warm-hearted support from an obviously energized Daniel Barenboim and the Berlin Staatskapelle, with strong engineering from Deutsche Grammophon in the Funkhaus Natepastraße in Berlin. The result is a superior recording of some well-worn repertory concertos. This isn't a single artistic statement; the two concertos were recorded a year apart. But each one is grasped as a living, breathing entity. Get the technical prowess out of the way by sampling the blistering finale of the Sibelius Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47, and turn then to the Tchaikovsky opening movement, where Batiashvili cultivates a restrained purity of expression that Jascha Heifetz would have loved. In the extremely dark, slow movement of the ostensibly less sentimental Sibelius, however, Batiashvili pours on the emotion. Each of the six movements here seems to tell a story in the best Romantic tradition, and in addition to marking a stage in the ascent of a new star, the album handsomely marks Barenboim's diamond jubilee. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Música sinfónica - Publicado el 2 de febrero de 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Libreto Premios 5 de Diapason - Toma de Sonido Excepcional
Además de los dos conciertos para violín de Prokofiev, cuya amplia discografía se enriquece evidentemente con esta nueva interpretación de la violinista georgiana Lisa Batiashvili y del excelente director Yannick Nézet-Seguin, este álbum incluye tres «golosinas» de Prokofiev, firmadas por Tamás Batiashvili –el padre de Lisa, uno de los pedagogos más reputados en su país. Se trata, siempre basadas en Prokofiev evidentemente, de reescrituras para violín y orquesta de la Danza de los caballeros del ballet Romeo y Julieta, del Vals de La cenicienta, y de la diabólica y bufa Marcha de El amor de las tres naranjas. Batiashvili-padre, aligerando la orquestación, permite al violín solo cantar mejor en algunos momentos muy espesos, dicho sea de paso, de la partitura original, en particular la pesante Danza de los caballeros que, al perder su peso impresionante, gana en lirismo. En cuanto a los dos conciertos, se benefician notablemente del efectivo razonable de la Orquesta de Cámara de Europa, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta la gran transparencia de la escritura de Prokofiev. © SM/Qobuz
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Clásica - Publicado el 28 de enero de 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Gramophone Editor's Choice - Hi-Res Audio
Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili (whose name appears in the graphics in Georgia's uniquely beautiful script) is a worthy avatar of the great Russian school. Perhaps the strand of that tradition she most recalls is the one flowing from Jascha Heifetz, with his steely tonal perfection, long lines, and grasp of overall structure. These qualities serve Batiashvili well in the Brahms Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77, a work for which there is certainly no shortage of available recordings. Where Batiashvili has the advantage over her peers, however, is in her close relationship with the orchestra here; this is her first recording with the Staatskapelle Dresden orchestra, of which she is "Capell-Virtuosin." It shows in her close work with conductor Christian Thielemann at the joints of Brahms' vast first-movement canvas, perhaps the most perfect marriage of sheer virtuosity with profound structural thinking in the history of music. The points at which the movement's intermediate dotted-rhythm theme return and mark the movement's sectional organization are handled with special snap here. Batiashvili, playing a fearsome cadenza by Ferruccio Busoni in the first movement, is technically superb, but she doesn't let technique overwhelm enthusiasm. The other strong point of this performance is the rousing finale, which is not unprecedented but is definitely not common among younger players fearful of stepping out. Again, Batiashvili manages a variety of sharp but not harsh attack to match Thielemann's rhythmic drive. If there's a downside here, it's the conclusion of the album, a trio of Romances for violin and piano, Op. 22, by Clara Schumann. These are worthwhile and underplayed pieces, but an orchestral potboiler would have been better; the music lurches from orchestra to violin-and-piano texture, and the switch in sound environment from the Lukaskirche in Dresden to the Bavaria Musikstudios in Munich is jarring. It sounds as though one recording has been taken off and another one put on. The Brahms is so good that this is no more than a minor complaint, however. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 15 de septiembre de 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Libreto Premios 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
While violinist Lisa Batiashvili has recorded mostly Romantic and modernist music, she has chosen to perform works by J.S. Bach for her third album on Deutsche Grammophon, signaling an expansion of a repertoire that is already quite varied. Even the selections on this 2014 release show a preference for a mix of pieces, with only the Violin Concerto in E major, the solo Violin Sonata in A minor, and the Sinfonia from the cantata Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe to showcase her talents as soloist. The rest of her program features her husband, oboist François Leleux, in the Double Concerto for violin and oboe in C minor, and the aria from the St. Matthew Passion, Erbarme dich, mein Gott, which he plays on oboe d'amore; and the Trio for flute, violin, and continuo in B minor by C.P.E. Bach, with flutist Emmanuel Pahud. Batiashvili generously shares the spotlight with these musicians, and their inclusion gives the whole CD an enjoyable feeling of conversation and flexibility of approach, which a straight run of violin concertos would have lacked. One drawback is the sound of the recording, which is echoic and a little indistinct, due to the resonant acoustics of the venues. Otherwise, this is a vibrant and appealing mainstream presentation of Bach that shows Batiashvili and her colleagues in a positive light. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 14 de abril de 2014 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Libreto Premios Hi-Res Audio
While Harrison Birtwistle has long been established as a composer of major works for the theater, he has maintained a connection to the humbler spheres of vocal and chamber music, writing modestly scaled works that, in substance and mood, are rarefied, reflective, and intimate. The two groups of settings of the poetry of Lorine Niedecker, composed for soprano and cello, have a spare quality reminiscent of Webern, and they possess a quiet, meditative stillness that comes from simplification of accompaniment and concentration of expression. Bogenstrich: Meditations on a Poem of Rilke, for voice, cello, and piano, is more richly textured and sometimes chordal, and though there are fleeting allusions to Romantic art song, the style is uncompromisingly modern. The Trio for violin, cello, and piano is unusual for Birtwistle because has avoided conventional instrumental groupings since he composed his Refrains and Choruses for wind quintet in 1957. Yet his handling of the violin and cello as independent parts, disconnected from the piano except for brief intersections of activity, is his solution to the problems of using such a standard ensemble and its attendant expectations. The somber performances by soprano Amy Freston, baritone Roderick Williams, violinist Lisa Batiashvili, cellist Adrian Brendel, and pianist Till Fellner, produce an introspective mood, and the subdued program is stock in trade for ECM New Series. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 15 de septiembre de 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Libreto Premios 4 étoiles Classica
While violinist Lisa Batiashvili has recorded mostly Romantic and modernist music, she has chosen to perform works by J.S. Bach for her third album on Deutsche Grammophon, signaling an expansion of a repertoire that is already quite varied. Even the selections on this 2014 release show a preference for a mix of pieces, with only the Violin Concerto in E major, the solo Violin Sonata in A minor, and the Sinfonia from the cantata Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe to showcase her talents as soloist. The rest of her program features her husband, oboist François Leleux, in the Double Concerto for violin and oboe in C minor, and the aria from the St. Matthew Passion, Erbarme dich, mein Gott, which he plays on oboe d'amore; and the Trio for flute, violin, and continuo in B minor by C.P.E. Bach, with flutist Emmanuel Pahud. Batiashvili generously shares the spotlight with these musicians, and their inclusion gives the whole CD an enjoyable feeling of conversation and flexibility of approach, which a straight run of violin concertos would have lacked. One drawback is the sound of the recording, which is echoic and a little indistinct, due to the resonant acoustics of the venues. Otherwise, this is a vibrant and appealing mainstream presentation of Bach that shows Batiashvili and her colleagues in a positive light. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 5 de junio de 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res
Los álbumes temáticos son populares entre muchos músicos clásicos que parecen asfixiarse en la camisa de fuerza que les impone su universo repleto de obras maestras intimidantes. La violinista Lisa Batiashvili nos invita a seguirla en un viaje autobiográfico, describiendo musicalmente los lugares importantes y los recuerdos de su vida y su carrera desde su Georgia natal hasta París, Berlín, Buenos Aires y Hollywood. En unos arreglos muy románticos de Nikoloz Rachveli, con nostálgicos efectos sonoros cinematográficos, la virtuosa violinista rinde homenaje a Charles Chaplin con música que éste compuso o utilizó para sus propias películas, empezando por City Lights, que da título al álbum. “Chaplin era muy popular en Georgia cuando yo era una niña”, dice Lisa Batiashvili. “Tenía múltiples talentos, no sólo actuaba y dirigía películas, sino que también escribía música hermosa. Para mí, él representa la belleza y la imaginación creativa del siglo XX.” La elección musical aquí es muy personal, y abarca desde la música de Bach hasta los inevitables Astor Piazzolla, Johann Strauss, Michel Legrand y muchos otros. Entre los colaboradores de Lisa Batiashvili se encuentran su compatriota georgiana, la cantante Katie Melua, el guitarrista Miloš Karadaglić y el trompetista de jazz alemán Till Brönner. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Clásica - Publicado el 21 de marzo de 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Libreto
As a debut recording on Deutsche Grammophon, Lisa Batiashvili's Echoes of Time works reasonably well because it demonstrates a seriousness of purpose that any rising violinist would wish to convey and provides a showcase for her virtuosity. Dmitry Shostakovich's Violin Concerto No. 1 sets a keynote of gravitas and introduces us to the theme of the album, which is that the works presented here were influenced in one way or another by the culture and politics of the Soviet Union. Batiashvili, a native of Georgia, has an interest in the Soviet experience, and Shostakovich's work is one of the musical landmarks of the Soviet era. In this performance with the Bavarian Radio Symphony, conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen, Batiashvili expresses intense emotion and displays extraordinary skill, and the profoundly elegiac moods that her long lines etch in the first movement and the passacaglia are balanced by her glittering pyrotechnics in the scherzo and the finale. The Violin Concerto is followed by a short work, V & V by Giya Kancheli, a Georgian composer noted for his somber music, and the slightly sardonic "Lyrical Waltz" by Shostakovich, which closes out the orchestral part of the album. The rest of the disc offers two short chamber pieces, performed by Batiashvili and pianist Hélène Grimaud. The inclusion of Spiegel im Spiegel by Arvo Pärt, an Estonian, and the Vocalise by Sergey Rachmaninov, a Russian, continues the album's eastern European orientation, though Rachmaninov was an emigré to the west after the 1917 Russian revolution, and his Vocalise, published in 1912, can hardly be considered a product of Soviet influence. With this oddity overlooked, this album is a respectable effort, and Batiashvili deserves credit for a fine performance of the concerto, though the rest of the album is less compelling. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 1 de septiembre de 2008 | Sony Classical

Libreto
While older listeners may not be moved to cast aside their favorite recordings of Beethoven's Violin Concerto, younger listeners may be moved to embrace this 2009 recording performed by Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili. For one thing, Batiashvili has a virtuoso technique rivaling the best of past players. Her tone is pure but touched with sweetness, her intonation precise but not at all pedantic, her phrasing lyrical but not the least sappy, and her feeling for rhythm irresistible. For another thing, Batiashvili has a poetic sensibility likewise rivaling the best of past players. To top if off, Batiashvili functions as her own accompanist, leading the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen with a deft sense of partnership. Batiashvili has cunningly preceded her Beethoven recording with a set of six short pieces by Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze called, appropriately enough, Miniatures arranged for violin and orchestra by the soloist's father and accompanied by the Georgian Chamber Orchestra, also under the soloist's direction. Though neither Batiashvili nor anyone else would assert these works rival Beethoven's concerto in depth and substance, the Miniatures are inordinately charming pieces that not only introduce an otherwise unknown composer to an international public, but cleverly set up Beethoven's concerto so the listener can hear that warhorse with fresh, or at least fresher ears. Recorded in cool, clear digital sound, this recording deserves to be heard by anyone who enjoys Beethoven's Violin Concerto. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 23 de febrero de 2018 | Warner Classics

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Clásica - Publicado el 4 de noviembre de 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Libreto
The Georgian-German violinist Lisa Batiashvili has quietly reached the point of being one of the cognoscenti's players in mainstream repertory, with a free-spirited manner married to formidable technique in such a way as to bring to mind the greats of the past. Here she has warm-hearted support from an obviously energized Daniel Barenboim and the Berlin Staatskapelle, with strong engineering from Deutsche Grammophon in the Funkhaus Natepastraße in Berlin. The result is a superior recording of some well-worn repertory concertos. This isn't a single artistic statement; the two concertos were recorded a year apart. But each one is grasped as a living, breathing entity. Get the technical prowess out of the way by sampling the blistering finale of the Sibelius Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47, and turn then to the Tchaikovsky opening movement, where Batiashvili cultivates a restrained purity of expression that Jascha Heifetz would have loved. In the extremely dark, slow movement of the ostensibly less sentimental Sibelius, however, Batiashvili pours on the emotion. Each of the six movements here seems to tell a story in the best Romantic tradition, and in addition to marking a stage in the ascent of a new star, the album handsomely marks Barenboim's diamond jubilee. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 5 de junio de 2020 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Los álbumes temáticos son populares entre muchos músicos clásicos que parecen asfixiarse en la camisa de fuerza que les impone su universo repleto de obras maestras intimidantes. La violinista Lisa Batiashvili nos invita a seguirla en un viaje autobiográfico, describiendo musicalmente los lugares importantes y los recuerdos de su vida y su carrera desde su Georgia natal hasta París, Berlín, Buenos Aires y Hollywood. En unos arreglos muy románticos de Nikoloz Rachveli, con nostálgicos efectos sonoros cinematográficos, la virtuosa violinista rinde homenaje a Charles Chaplin con música que éste compuso o utilizó para sus propias películas, empezando por City Lights, que da título al álbum. “Chaplin era muy popular en Georgia cuando yo era una niña”, dice Lisa Batiashvili. “Tenía múltiples talentos, no sólo actuaba y dirigía películas, sino que también escribía música hermosa. Para mí, él representa la belleza y la imaginación creativa del siglo XX.” La elección musical aquí es muy personal, y abarca desde la música de Bach hasta los inevitables Astor Piazzolla, Johann Strauss, Michel Legrand y muchos otros. Entre los colaboradores de Lisa Batiashvili se encuentran su compatriota georgiana, la cantante Katie Melua, el guitarrista Miloš Karadaglić y el trompetista de jazz alemán Till Brönner. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Clásica - Publicado el 2 de febrero de 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Libreto
Además de los dos conciertos para violín de Prokofiev, cuya amplia discografía se enriquece evidentemente con esta nueva interpretación de la violinista georgiana Lisa Batiashvili y del excelente director Yannick Nézet-Seguin, este álbum incluye tres «golosinas» de Prokofiev, firmadas por Tamás Batiashvili –el padre de Lisa, uno de los pedagogos más reputados en su país. Se trata, siempre basadas en Prokofiev evidentemente, de reescrituras para violín y orquesta de la Danza de los caballeros del ballet Romeo y Julieta, del Vals de La cenicienta, y de la diabólica y bufa Marcha de El amor de las tres naranjas. Batiashvili-padre, aligerando la orquestación, permite al violín solo cantar mejor en algunos momentos muy espesos, dicho sea de paso, de la partitura original, en particular la pesante Danza de los caballeros que, al perder su peso impresionante, gana en lirismo. En cuanto a los dos conciertos, se benefician notablemente del efectivo razonable de la Orquesta de Cámara de Europa, sobre todo teniendo en cuenta la gran transparencia de la escritura de Prokofiev. © SM/Qobuz
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Clásica - Publicado el 1 de septiembre de 2008 | Sony Classical

Libreto
While older listeners may not be moved to cast aside their favorite recordings of Beethoven's Violin Concerto, younger listeners may be moved to embrace this 2009 recording performed by Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili. For one thing, Batiashvili has a virtuoso technique rivaling the best of past players. Her tone is pure but touched with sweetness, her intonation precise but not at all pedantic, her phrasing lyrical but not the least sappy, and her feeling for rhythm irresistible. For another thing, Batiashvili has a poetic sensibility likewise rivaling the best of past players. To top if off, Batiashvili functions as her own accompanist, leading the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen with a deft sense of partnership. Batiashvili has cunningly preceded her Beethoven recording with a set of six short pieces by Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze called, appropriately enough, Miniatures arranged for violin and orchestra by the soloist's father and accompanied by the Georgian Chamber Orchestra, also under the soloist's direction. Though neither Batiashvili nor anyone else would assert these works rival Beethoven's concerto in depth and substance, the Miniatures are inordinately charming pieces that not only introduce an otherwise unknown composer to an international public, but cleverly set up Beethoven's concerto so the listener can hear that warhorse with fresh, or at least fresher ears. Recorded in cool, clear digital sound, this recording deserves to be heard by anyone who enjoys Beethoven's Violin Concerto. © TiVo
A partir de:
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Clásica - Publicado el 1 de septiembre de 2008 | Sony Classical

While older listeners may not be moved to cast aside their favorite recordings of Beethoven's Violin Concerto, younger listeners may be moved to embrace this 2009 recording performed by Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili. For one thing, Batiashvili has a virtuoso technique rivaling the best of past players. Her tone is pure but touched with sweetness, her intonation precise but not at all pedantic, her phrasing lyrical but not the least sappy, and her feeling for rhythm irresistible. For another thing, Batiashvili has a poetic sensibility likewise rivaling the best of past players. To top if off, Batiashvili functions as her own accompanist, leading the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen with a deft sense of partnership. Batiashvili has cunningly preceded her Beethoven recording with a set of six short pieces by Georgian composer Sulkhan Tsintsadze called, appropriately enough, Miniatures arranged for violin and orchestra by the soloist's father and accompanied by the Georgian Chamber Orchestra, also under the soloist's direction. Though neither Batiashvili nor anyone else would assert these works rival Beethoven's concerto in depth and substance, the Miniatures are inordinately charming pieces that not only introduce an otherwise unknown composer to an international public, but cleverly set up Beethoven's concerto so the listener can hear that warhorse with fresh, or at least fresher ears. Recorded in cool, clear digital sound, this recording deserves to be heard by anyone who enjoys Beethoven's Violin Concerto. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 28 de enero de 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Libreto
Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili (whose name appears in the graphics in Georgia's uniquely beautiful script) is a worthy avatar of the great Russian school. Perhaps the strand of that tradition she most recalls is the one flowing from Jascha Heifetz, with his steely tonal perfection, long lines, and grasp of overall structure. These qualities serve Batiashvili well in the Brahms Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77, a work for which there is certainly no shortage of available recordings. Where Batiashvili has the advantage over her peers, however, is in her close relationship with the orchestra here; this is her first recording with the Staatskapelle Dresden orchestra, of which she is "Capell-Virtuosin." It shows in her close work with conductor Christian Thielemann at the joints of Brahms' vast first-movement canvas, perhaps the most perfect marriage of sheer virtuosity with profound structural thinking in the history of music. The points at which the movement's intermediate dotted-rhythm theme return and mark the movement's sectional organization are handled with special snap here. Batiashvili, playing a fearsome cadenza by Ferruccio Busoni in the first movement, is technically superb, but she doesn't let technique overwhelm enthusiasm. The other strong point of this performance is the rousing finale, which is not unprecedented but is definitely not common among younger players fearful of stepping out. Again, Batiashvili manages a variety of sharp but not harsh attack to match Thielemann's rhythmic drive. If there's a downside here, it's the conclusion of the album, a trio of Romances for violin and piano, Op. 22, by Clara Schumann. These are worthwhile and underplayed pieces, but an orchestral potboiler would have been better; the music lurches from orchestra to violin-and-piano texture, and the switch in sound environment from the Lukaskirche in Dresden to the Bavaria Musikstudios in Munich is jarring. It sounds as though one recording has been taken off and another one put on. The Brahms is so good that this is no more than a minor complaint, however. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 12 de enero de 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Clásica - Publicado el 14 de abril de 2014 | ECM New Series

While Harrison Birtwistle has long been established as a composer of major works for the theater, he has maintained a connection to the humbler spheres of vocal and chamber music, writing modestly scaled works that, in substance and mood, are rarefied, reflective, and intimate. The two groups of settings of the poetry of Lorine Niedecker, composed for soprano and cello, have a spare quality reminiscent of Webern, and they possess a quiet, meditative stillness that comes from simplification of accompaniment and concentration of expression. Bogenstrich: Meditations on a Poem of Rilke, for voice, cello, and piano, is more richly textured and sometimes chordal, and though there are fleeting allusions to Romantic art song, the style is uncompromisingly modern. The Trio for violin, cello, and piano is unusual for Birtwistle because has avoided conventional instrumental groupings since he composed his Refrains and Choruses for wind quintet in 1957. Yet his handling of the violin and cello as independent parts, disconnected from the piano except for brief intersections of activity, is his solution to the problems of using such a standard ensemble and its attendant expectations. The somber performances by soprano Amy Freston, baritone Roderick Williams, violinist Lisa Batiashvili, cellist Adrian Brendel, and pianist Till Fellner, produce an introspective mood, and the subdued program is stock in trade for ECM New Series. © TiVo
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Clásica - Publicado el 26 de enero de 2018 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)