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Pop - Publicado el 9 de mayo de 2006 | Wicked Game - Reprise

En muchos sentidos Chris Isaak es el candidato perfecto para una recopilación de sus mejores trabajos: es consistente, no solo en la calidad sino también en el estilo de su música, que no se ha apartado mucho del pop retro taciturno y suave de su debut de 1985. Por ello, cuando sus discos se mezclan y combinan como se ha hecho aquí, parece como si fuese un verdadero álbum. Este generoso recopilatorio de 18 pistas hace hueco para algunos temas relativamente poco comunes, además de contener una experta selección de su mejor pop retro astutamente sexy y fluido, incluidos sus cuatro grandes éxitos ("Wicked Game", "Can't Do a Thing [To Stop Me]", "Somebody's Crying", "Baby Did a Bad Bad Thing"), junto con otros muchos de sus temas más destacados. Para muchos oyentes, esto será todo el Chris Isaak que necesitarán. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 9 de mayo de 2006 | Chris Isaak

En muchos sentidos Chris Isaak es el candidato perfecto para una recopilación de sus mejores trabajos: es consistente, no solo en la calidad sino también en el estilo de su música, que no se ha apartado mucho del pop retro taciturno y suave de su debut de 1985. Por ello, cuando sus discos se mezclan y combinan como se ha hecho aquí, parece como si fuese un verdadero álbum. Este generoso recopilatorio de 18 pistas hace hueco para algunos temas relativamente poco comunes, además de contener una experta selección de su mejor pop retro astutamente sexy y fluido, incluidos sus cuatro grandes éxitos ("Wicked Game", "Can't Do a Thing [To Stop Me]", "Somebody's Crying", "Baby Did a Bad Bad Thing"), junto con otros muchos de sus temas más destacados. Para muchos oyentes, esto será todo el Chris Isaak que necesitarán. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 13 de noviembre de 2015 | Concord

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Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 13 de junio de 1989 | Chris Isaak

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Lounge - Publicado el 17 de enero de 2012 | Rhino

Algunos discos son tan obvios que parece insólito que no hayan existido antes. Es ese el caso de Beyond The Sun de Chris Isaak, un tributo a Sun Records, el sello de rock & roll clásico. Desde su primer álbum, Isaak ha siempre evidenciado una enorme deuda hacia los titanes de Sun, en particular Roy Orbison y Elvis Presley, ambos profusamente representados en este disco. Isaak no se limita estrictamente a canciones publicadas por Sun, pero tampoco se limita a lo obvio, incluyendo, por ejemplo, excelentes canciones de artistas como Warren Smith. No son estas reinterpretaciones sino sinceros homenajes -y si bien no puede decirse que se trate de un proyecto arriesgado, Beyond The Sun posee estilo y pasión en abundancia. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 23 de mayo de 1995 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 1 de enero de 2012 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 10 de marzo de 1987 | Chris Isaak

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Ambientes - Publicado el 10 de noviembre de 2017 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Rock - Publicado el 11 de diciembre de 2015 | Rhino

Hi-Res
Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 22 de septiembre de 1998 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 10 de enero de 1985 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 13 de noviembre de 2015 | Concord

Hi-Res Libreto
Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 12 de febrero de 2002 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 24 de febrero de 2009 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 13 de noviembre de 2015 | Concord

Vintage-inspired singer/songwriter Chris Isaak has periodically attempted to update his '50s and '60s-influenced sound. Albums like 2002's Always Got Tonight and 2009's Mr. Lucky found the California native incorporating funk grooves, modern rock guitars, and the occasional synthesizer. Despite these moves toward contemporizing his pompadour-accented approach however, Isaak's best work, even on those albums, is always on the tracks where he embraces his old-school aesthetics and delivers melodic, twangy songs in his signature goosebump-inducing croon. This is the approach Isaak takes on his 13th studio album, 2015's First Comes the Night. Technically, the album is Isaak's first collection of all original music since Mr. Lucky, but stylistically, this record has more in common with his 2011 tribute to Sun Records, Beyond the Sun. As with that album, First Comes the Night has a vintage rock & roll vibe with songs that will play just as well to longtime Isaak fans as to listeners who only know him from his 1990 hit "Wicked Game." Recorded in Nashville, the album was produced by Paul Worley (Dixie Chicks, Lady Antebellum, Martina McBride), Dave Cobb (Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson, Shooter Jennings), and longtime Isaak associate Mark Needham. Despite its Nashville origin, First Comes the Night is not entirely a country album, though Isaak does touch on that sound here. Cuts like the yearning, piano-driven "The Way Things Really Are" and the bopping, darkly humorous "Down in Flames" sound like long lost Bob Luman hits. Primarily, however, the songs on this record are '50s and '60s-style pop tunes driven by Isaak's smoky vocal and devil-eyed lyrics. The title track is one of the most archetypical Isaak-sounding tracks he's recorded in years, recalling a mix of the Traveling Wilburys and the Righteous Brothers. Similarly, "Perfect Lover," with its rollicking rhythm and mariachi-esque horn section, finds Isaak paying tribute once again to Roy Orbison and Willie Nelson. There are also some surprises on First Comes the Night, including the Gypsy jazz-style "Baby What You Want Me to Do" and the circusy "Don't Break My Heart," which brings to mind the kitschy soundtrack to an Elvis movie. While First Comes the Night doesn't break any new stylistic ground for Isaak, it also doesn't hurt his reputation, and deftly reinforces his image as a glamorous, charming torchbearer for traditional pop songcraft. © Matt Collar /TiVo
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Rock - Publicado el 27 de agosto de 2021 | Sun Record Co.

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Rock - Publicado el 15 de junio de 2010 | Chris Isaak

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Rock - Publicado el 12 de octubre de 2004 | Chris Isaak