Qobuz Store wallpaper
Categories:
Cart 0

Your cart is empty

Martin Lorenz|Haas: Works for ensemble

Haas: Works for ensemble

Enno Poppe

Available in
16-Bit CD Quality 44.1 kHz - Stereo

Unlimited Streaming

Listen to this album in high quality now on our apps

Start my trial period and start listening to this album

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Subscribe

Enjoy this album on Qobuz apps with your subscription

Digital Download

Purchase and download this album in a wide variety of formats depending on your needs.

Although Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Haas has been active since about 1980, he didn't garner attention for his work until after the turn of the 21st century. On the surface, Haas is a composer who utilizes microtones extensively, but he dislikes such characterization, as he has stated, "I am not really comfortable with being pigeonholed as a ‘microtonal composer’. Primarily, I am a composer, free to use the means needed for my music." Neos' Georg Friedrich Haas: Works for Ensemble includes three pieces, starting with Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich… (Who, If I Cried Out, Would Hear Me…, 1993), which functions like a percussion concerto, and …aus freier Lust…verbunden… (…from free desire…connected…, 1994-1996), which consists of a few parts (bass flute, bass clarinet, and two percussionists) extracted from a larger score entitled Concord of free beings. The disc is closed out by a 2008 work entitled …und… (…and…) for chamber orchestra combined with some electronic tracks. Haas' music is performed by Collegium Novum Zürich under the direction of Enno Poppe, with Martin Lorenz as solo percussionist. Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich… starts off strong, building continuously throughout the first half with upward gliding movement through the ensemble. However, after it reaches the self-appointed climax at its center -- you can read a detailed description of how this piece progresses in the booklet -- it drops to a near silent level, with little more than mere flurries of activity perceptible here and there until the piece plays out its 24-minute lifespan. The redistribution of individual parts to subgroups of musicians taken from a larger set is a method of working associated with John Cage, and no matter how minimal the material, Cage seems to make it work. With …aus freier Lust…verbunden…, you listen to the faint little clicks and burbling in the hopes that something might connect to your attention, but by the time that is reanimated you're already into the next piece, …und…. This work is more in the vein of the opening half of Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich… although it is punctuated at points by foreign elements such as pounding piano and loud bursts of electronic sound. The object here is to evoke various kinds of glassy/metallic wheezy/expanding sounds through the use of harmonic overtones. Overall it's effective; the best piece on the disc if you can hang on that long, though some might think it will sound like a hypnogogic hallucination about a busted radiator. One way or another, Neos' Georg Friedrich Haas: Works for Ensemble is a 63-minute disc that has about 39 interesting minutes to it, and that simply may not be enough for some listeners. Neos' recording is very clear, distinct, and three-dimensional.
© TiVo

More info

Haas: Works for ensemble

Martin Lorenz

launch qobuz app I already downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS Open

download qobuz app I have not downloaded Qobuz for Windows / MacOS yet Download the Qobuz app

You are currently listening to samples.

Listen to over 90 million songs with an unlimited streaming plan.

Listen to this playlist and more than 90 million songs with our unlimited streaming plans.

From kr125,00/month

Wer, wenn ich schriee, horte mich... (Georg Friedrich Haas)

1
Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich…
Martin Lorenz
00:24:17

Martin Lorenz, Performer - Enno Poppe, Conductor - Zurich Collegium Novum, Orchestra - Georg Friedrich Haas, Composer

(C) 2013 NEOS Music (P) 2013 NEOS Music

...aus freier Lust... verbunden... (Georg Friedrich Haas)

2
…aus freier Lust… verbunden…
Zurich Collegium Novum
00:12:21

Enno Poppe, Conductor - Zurich Collegium Novum, Orchestra - Georg Friedrich Haas, Composer

(C) 2013 NEOS Music (P) 2013 NEOS Music

...und... (first version) (Georg Friedrich Haas)

3
…und… (first version)
SWR Experimentalstudio
00:27:04

Enno Poppe, Conductor - South West German Radio Experimental Studio, Ensemble - Zurich Collegium Novum, Orchestra - Georg Friedrich Haas, Composer

(C) 2013 NEOS Music (P) 2013 NEOS Music

Album Description

Although Austrian composer Georg Friedrich Haas has been active since about 1980, he didn't garner attention for his work until after the turn of the 21st century. On the surface, Haas is a composer who utilizes microtones extensively, but he dislikes such characterization, as he has stated, "I am not really comfortable with being pigeonholed as a ‘microtonal composer’. Primarily, I am a composer, free to use the means needed for my music." Neos' Georg Friedrich Haas: Works for Ensemble includes three pieces, starting with Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich… (Who, If I Cried Out, Would Hear Me…, 1993), which functions like a percussion concerto, and …aus freier Lust…verbunden… (…from free desire…connected…, 1994-1996), which consists of a few parts (bass flute, bass clarinet, and two percussionists) extracted from a larger score entitled Concord of free beings. The disc is closed out by a 2008 work entitled …und… (…and…) for chamber orchestra combined with some electronic tracks. Haas' music is performed by Collegium Novum Zürich under the direction of Enno Poppe, with Martin Lorenz as solo percussionist. Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich… starts off strong, building continuously throughout the first half with upward gliding movement through the ensemble. However, after it reaches the self-appointed climax at its center -- you can read a detailed description of how this piece progresses in the booklet -- it drops to a near silent level, with little more than mere flurries of activity perceptible here and there until the piece plays out its 24-minute lifespan. The redistribution of individual parts to subgroups of musicians taken from a larger set is a method of working associated with John Cage, and no matter how minimal the material, Cage seems to make it work. With …aus freier Lust…verbunden…, you listen to the faint little clicks and burbling in the hopes that something might connect to your attention, but by the time that is reanimated you're already into the next piece, …und…. This work is more in the vein of the opening half of Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich… although it is punctuated at points by foreign elements such as pounding piano and loud bursts of electronic sound. The object here is to evoke various kinds of glassy/metallic wheezy/expanding sounds through the use of harmonic overtones. Overall it's effective; the best piece on the disc if you can hang on that long, though some might think it will sound like a hypnogogic hallucination about a busted radiator. One way or another, Neos' Georg Friedrich Haas: Works for Ensemble is a 63-minute disc that has about 39 interesting minutes to it, and that simply may not be enough for some listeners. Neos' recording is very clear, distinct, and three-dimensional.
© TiVo

About the album

Improve album information

Qobuz logo Why buy on Qobuz...

You may also like...

Matthew Locke: The Little Consort

Fretwork

Beethoven: Complete Sonatas for Piano & Violin

Tedi Papavrami

Six Evolutions - Bach: Cello Suites

Yo-Yo Ma

J.S. Bach: The Complete Cello Suites

Bruno Philippe

Johann Sebastian Bach : Suites pour violoncelle seul (Intégrale)

Jean-Guihen Queyras

In your panoramas...
Mason Bates' weird and wonderful electronic symphonies

What do you mean, you haven’t heard about Mason Bates (yet)? He is one of the hottest names on the North-American music scene. Born in 1977, Bates is a symphonic and lyrical composer as well as an electro DJ (under the alias DJ Masonic) – two completely opposing genres which he takes great delight in mixing. Around half of his symphonic and lyrical work consists, in one way or another, of electronic sounds. The majority of these sounds are “every day sounds”, which are prerecorded and later put into a score. On the release date of his brilliant opera The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, Qobuz interviewed this extraordinary person.

Radu Lupu: an Understated Genius

Radu Lupu was a poet, magician and pianist who pursued the indescribable. The Romanian artist’s musical approach was brought to life by his tormented and fiercely introverted personality, which was always shrouded in mystery. When sat at his piano, he would knead the keys like dough, seeking a powerful, consistent sound. Radu Lupu passed away on the 17th of April 2022, leaving behind a relatively small, yet incredibly valuable, discographic legacy.

François Couperin, the modern harpsichord

A favourite of Louis XIV, François Couperin (1668-1733) was the harpsichord superstar of the 18th century. At the time, the harpsichord was a prestigious instrument which was at the height of its fame (although it would return to obscurity in the following century), and Couperin revolutionised the way it was played, breaking a path that would later be trod by other virtuosos of the period like Dandrieu or Rameau. The Quebecois harpsichordist Olivier Fortin tells Qobuz the story of "Couperin the Great".

In the news...