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Country - Erschienen am 5. März 1986 | MCA Nashville

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On Steve Earle's first major American tour following the release of his debut album, Guitar Town, Earle found himself sharing a bill with Dwight Yoakam one night and the Replacements another, and one listen to the album explains why -- while the music was country through and through, Earle showed off enough swagger and attitude to intimidate anyone short of Keith Richards. While Earle's songs bore a certain resemblance to the Texas outlaw ethos (think Waylon Jennings in "Lonesome, On'ry and Mean" mode), they displayed a literate anger and street-smart snarl that set him apart from the typical Music Row hack, and no one in Nashville in 1986 was able (or willing) to write anything like the title song, a hilarious and harrowing tale of life on the road ("Well, I gotta keep rockin' while I still can/Got a two-pack habit and motel tan") or the bitterly unsentimental account of small-town life "Someday" ("You go to school, where you learn to read and write/So you can walk into the county bank and sign away your life"), the latter of which may be the best Bruce Springsteen song the Boss didn't write. And even when Earle gets a bit teary-eyed on "My Old Friend the Blues" and "Little Rock 'n' Roller," he showed off a battle-scarred heart that was tougher and harder-edged than most of his competition. Guitar Town is slightly flawed by an overly tidy production from Emory Gordy, Jr., and Tony Brown as well as a band that never hit quite as hard as Earle's voice, and he would make many stronger and more ambitious records in the future, but Guitar Town was his first shot at showing a major audience what he could do, and he hit a bull's-eye -- it's perhaps the strongest and most confident debut album any country act released in the 1980s. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Erschienen am 5. März 1986 | MCA Nashville

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Country - Erschienen am 17. Oktober 1988 | Geffen

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Steve Earle and Nashville had had just about enough of one another once it came time for him to cut his third album in 1988. Earle's first two albums, Guitar Town and Exit 0, had sold well and earned enthusiastic reviews, but his stubborn refusal to make nice, his desire to make more rock-influenced albums, and the faint but clear Leftism in his populist lyrical stance made him no friends at MCA's Nashville offices, and his growing dependence on heroin didn't help matters one bit. Earle was moved to MCA's Los Angeles-based Uni imprint, and he headed to Memphis to cut his third album, Copperhead Road. The result improbably became one of Earle's strongest albums; between its big drum sound, arena-sized guitars, and a swagger that owed more to the Rolling Stones and Guns N' Roses than country's New Traditionalists, Copperhead Road was the unabashed rock & roll album Earle had long threatened to make, but his attitude and personality were strong enough to handle the oversized production, and the songs showed that for all the aural firepower, this was still the same down-home troublemaker from Earle's first two albums. The moonshiner's tale of the title cut, the gunfighter's saga of "The Devil's Right Hand," and the story of two generations of soldiers in "Johnny Come Lately" (with the Pogues sitting in as Earle's backing band) were all tough but compelling narratives rooted in country tradition, and their rock moves updated them without robbing them of their power. And if the songs about love that dominate the album's second half don't have the same immediate impact, "Even When I'm Blue," "You Belong to Me," and "Once You Love" are honest and absorbing reflections of the heart of this dysfunctional romantic. Copperhead Road's production, which occasionally borders on hair metal territory, dates it, but the fire of Earle's performances and the strength of the songs more than compensates, and this album still connects 20 years on: if he had been able to hold himself together and make a few more records this strong, it's hard to imagine how big a star he could have become. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD10,99 €

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2002 | MCA Nashville

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CD13,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 17. Oktober 1988 | UNI

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Steve Earle and Nashville had had just about enough of one another once it came time for him to cut his third album in 1988. Earle's first two albums, Guitar Town and Exit 0, had sold well and earned enthusiastic reviews, but his stubborn refusal to make nice, his desire to make more rock-influenced albums, and the faint but clear Leftism in his populist lyrical stance made him no friends at MCA's Nashville offices, and his growing dependence on heroin didn't help matters one bit. Earle was moved to MCA's Los Angeles-based Uni imprint, and he headed to Memphis to cut his third album, Copperhead Road. The result improbably became one of Earle's strongest albums; between its big drum sound, arena-sized guitars, and a swagger that owed more to the Rolling Stones and Guns N' Roses than country's New Traditionalists, Copperhead Road was the unabashed rock & roll album Earle had long threatened to make, but his attitude and personality were strong enough to handle the oversized production, and the songs showed that for all the aural firepower, this was still the same down-home troublemaker from Earle's first two albums. The moonshiner's tale of the title cut, the gunfighter's saga of "The Devil's Right Hand," and the story of two generations of soldiers in "Johnny Come Lately" (with the Pogues sitting in as Earle's backing band) were all tough but compelling narratives rooted in country tradition, and their rock moves updated them without robbing them of their power. And if the songs about love that dominate the album's second half don't have the same immediate impact, "Even When I'm Blue," "You Belong to Me," and "Once You Love" are honest and absorbing reflections of the heart of this dysfunctional romantic. Copperhead Road's production, which occasionally borders on hair metal territory, dates it, but the fire of Earle's performances and the strength of the songs more than compensates, and this album still connects 20 years on: if he had been able to hold himself together and make a few more records this strong, it's hard to imagine how big a star he could have become. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD11,49 €

Country - Erschienen am 1. März 1996 | Warner Records

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Country - Erschienen am 10. Januar 1997 | Warner Records

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Guy

Country - Erschienen am 29. März 2019 | New West Records

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Steve Earle hat die Namen seiner beiden größten Idole immer wie Parolen ausgerufen. Dem ersten, Townes Van Zandt, erwies er im Jahre 2009 sogar mit einem ganzen Album die Ehre, Townes. Guy Clark kam zehn Jahre später an die Reihe, mit Guy. Ein bedeutender Songwriter, dieser außergewöhnliche Geschichtenerzähler und Troubadour mit Reibeisenstimme aus Texas, dessen Songs von Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Ricky Skaggs, Emmylou Harris, Bobby Bare, Vince Gill oder auch George Strait gecovert wurden. Er starb im Jahre 2016, gehört aber nach wie vor zu den wichtigsten Mitgliedern dieses besonderen Clans von Songwritern, die sich wie nur wenige darauf verstehen, uns das Elend und die Misere vor Augen und Ohren zu führen. Schon als 19-Jähriger hatte Steve Earle Gelegenheit, den Bass in seiner Gruppe zu spielen. „Townes und Guy bedeuteten mir genauso viel wie Kerouac und Allen Ginsberg“, erklärt Earle heute. Ich bin sehr froh, dass die beiden meine Lehrmeister waren. Würden Sie Townes fragen, worum es geht, so würde er Ihnen eine Platte hinhalten, Dee Browns Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Stellen Sie Guy genau dieselbe Frage, dann wird er einen Zettel nehmen und Ihnen beibringen, wie man einen Song skizziert, wohin jeder einzelne Teil gehört… Townes war einer der größten Songwriter aller Zeiten, aber in den letzten fünfzehn Jahren seines Lebens hat er nur drei Songs zu Ende geschrieben. Guy hatte Krebs, schrieb aber auch am letzten Tag seines Lebens noch Songs. Er malte, bastelte Instrumente, und im Gitarrengeschäft, das er in der Bay Area besaß, lungerte der junge Bobby Weir herum. Er war älter und weiser. Wenn man mit ihm durch die Gegend zog, dann verstand man auch, warum das, was ein Künstler macht, Disziplin heißt. Weil er eben diszipliniert war.“ Im Alter von 64 Jahren wurde Steve Earle selbst so etwas wie ein Weiser. Eine Ikone des Alternative Country, die sich immer Zeit nimmt, etwas weiterzugeben und Werte, Ideen, einen Sound und ein Erbe zum Leuchten zu bringen. Dank dieser einzigartigen Stimme erscheint Clarks Werk hier in strahlendem Glanz. Obwohl Earles eine gewisse klassische Haltung im Auge behält, bietet er hier außerdem gehaltvolle Versionen der legendären Hits Desperados Waiting for the Train und That Old Time Feeling. Am Ende seiner Platte präsentiert er uns den fesselnden Titel Old Friends, eben mit einer ganzen Reihe an old friends: Emmylou Harris, Rodney Crowell, Terry Allen, Jerry Jeff Walker und Jo Harvey Allen. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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CD16,99 €

Reggae - Erschienen am 26. September 1997 | Warner Records

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Country - Erschienen am 6. Juni 2000 | Warner Records

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Country - Erschienen am 16. Juni 2017 | Warner Records

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Auch wenn  Steve Earle nicht zur selben Generation gehört wie Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Billy Joe Shaver, Kris Kristoferson oder ähnlichen Künstlern, so ist auch er ein Outlaw mit Ersatzteilgarantie…Das stimmt in Bezug auf das, was ihm anfangs gewisse Leute vorgeworfen haben: zu sehr Rock für Nashville, zu sehr Country für die Rockszene. Nach und nach hat sich Earle ganz einfach einen Namen als Songwriter gemacht und kümmert sich wenig darum, zu welcher musikalischen Familie er einmal gehören will. Er geht immerhin bei seinen texanischen Stadtfreunden Townes Van Zandt und Guy Clark in die Lehre und gehört damit in den siebziger Jahren zu dieser Outlaw-Gemeinde am Stadtrand von Nashville. Hier haben wir es außerdem mit einem unverbesserlichen Don Juan zu tun (sieben Ehen!), mit einem reuigen Junkie, der nach einer langen Höllenfahrt im Gefängnis gelandet war, der sich auch zeitweise als Schauspieler in populären Serien wie The Wire oder Treme betätigte und schließlich als Schriftsteller (mit einem Erzählband unter dem Titel Doghouse Roses und anschließend dem Roman I’ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive. Er fühlt sich im schlagkräftigsten Country Rock und Folk genauso wohl wie im Bluegrass, und er spielt diese Stile als inbrünstiger Punk und Rebell aus tiefster Seele, der bei jeder Auseinandersetzung der radikalen Linken in Amerika mit dabei ist. Damit erweist der selbsternannte Hardcore-Troubadour der aufsässigen Ader seines Daseins, und zugleich dem ärgsten Outlaw die Ehre: Waylon Jennings. Und die Gitarren sind mit dabei, um sich auszutoben, das hatte Steve Earle seit Ewigkeiten nicht gemacht. Schon bei den ersten Takten des So You Wannabe An Outlaw, dem ersten Song, der dem Album auch den Namen gibt, erkennt man ziemlich deutlich, dass der Vollbärtige den Country Rock im Schilde führt. Und erst recht, wenn mitten in dieser dynamischen Single Willie Nelsons Stimme erklingt! Übrigens spielt Earle auch mit Miranda Lambert im Duo, und zwar auf This is How It Ends und anschließend tut er dies auch mit Johnny Bush (dem Autor von Willie Nelsons Whiskey River!) für Walkin‘ in LA. Hat man sich diese genüssliche Platte erst einmal angehört, endet man schweißgebadet und staubbedeckt mit zerschundenen Fäusten. Ich möchte darauf hinweisen, dass diese Deluxe-Ausgabe ganz besondere Wiederaufnahmen enthält: Billy Joe Shavers Ain't No God in Mexico, Willie Nelsons Sister's Coming Home/Down At The Corner Beer Joint sowie The Local Memory und Waylon Jennings‘ großartiger Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way, die Hymne des Outlaws schlechthin. © MZ/Qobuz
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Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1987 | MCA Nashville

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Steve Earle once told a reporter that after listening to the final mix of 1987's Exit 0, he and his band hopped on their tour bus and played yet another gig that night, which is what they'd been doing during most of their time off from recording sessions. Exit 0 was recorded with Earle's road band, the Dukes, instead of the usual team of Nashville session pros, and as a consequence it boasts a leaner, tougher sound than his debut, Guitar Town, though the slightly slick cookie-cutter production by Tony Brown, Emory Gordy, Jr., and Richard Bennett saps a bit of the music's power. The album features a few great songs, including "I Ain't Never Satisfied" (which could practically be Earle's theme song), "The Week of Living Dangerously," "The Rain Came Down," and "Sweet Little '66," but there's a faint hint of sophomore slump to Exit 0 -- "No. 29" is far too sentimental for its own good, the Doug Sahm homage "San Antonio Girl" isn't nearly as good as the songs that clearly inspired it, and "Angry Young Man" feels like filler, something in short supply on most Steve Earle albums. Exit 0 is just uneven enough to qualify as a genuine disappointment, though that's within the context of Earle's body of work; this is still livelier stuff than nearly anyone in Nashville was cranking out at the time (short of Dwight Yoakam) and the high points confirm the guy who wrote "Guitar Town" had more fine tunes where that came from. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Erschienen am 9. April 2002 | Warner Records

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Country - Erschienen am 16. Juni 2017 | Warner Records

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Auch wenn  Steve Earle nicht zur selben Generation gehört wie Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Billy Joe Shaver, Kris Kristoferson oder ähnlichen Künstlern, so ist auch er ein Outlaw mit Ersatzteilgarantie…Das stimmt in Bezug auf das, was ihm anfangs gewisse Leute vorgeworfen haben: zu sehr Rock für Nashville, zu sehr Country für die Rockszene. Nach und nach hat sich Earle ganz einfach einen Namen als Songwriter gemacht und kümmert sich wenig darum, zu welcher musikalischen Familie er einmal gehören will. Er geht immerhin bei seinen texanischen Stadtfreunden Townes Van Zandt und Guy Clark in die Lehre und gehört damit in den siebziger Jahren zu dieser Outlaw-Gemeinde am Stadtrand von Nashville. Hier haben wir es außerdem mit einem unverbesserlichen Don Juan zu tun (sieben Ehen!), mit einem reuigen Junkie, der nach einer langen Höllenfahrt im Gefängnis gelandet war, der sich auch zeitweise als Schauspieler in populären Serien wie The Wire oder Treme betätigte und schließlich als Schriftsteller (mit einem Erzählband unter dem Titel Doghouse Roses und anschließend dem Roman I’ll Never Get Out Of This World Alive. Er fühlt sich im schlagkräftigsten Country Rock und Folk genauso wohl wie im Bluegrass, und er spielt diese Stile als inbrünstiger Punk und Rebell aus tiefster Seele, der bei jeder Auseinandersetzung der radikalen Linken in Amerika mit dabei ist. Damit erweist der selbsternannte Hardcore-Troubadour der aufsässigen Ader seines Daseins, und zugleich dem ärgsten Outlaw die Ehre: Waylon Jennings. Und die Gitarren sind mit dabei, um sich auszutoben, das hatte Steve Earle seit Ewigkeiten nicht gemacht. Schon bei den ersten Takten des So You Wannabe An Outlaw, dem ersten Song, der dem Album auch den Namen gibt, erkennt man ziemlich deutlich, dass der Vollbärtige den Country Rock im Schilde führt. Und erst recht, wenn mitten in dieser dynamischen Single Willie Nelsons Stimme erklingt! Übrigens spielt Earle auch mit Miranda Lambert im Duo, und zwar auf This is How It Ends und anschließend tut er dies auch mit Johnny Bush (dem Autor von Willie Nelsons Whiskey River!) für Walkin‘ in LA. Hat man sich diese genüssliche Platte erst einmal angehört, endet man schweißgebadet und staubbedeckt mit zerschundenen Fäusten. Ich möchte darauf hinweisen, dass diese Ausgabe ganz besondere Wiederaufnahmen enthält: Billy Joe Shavers Ain't No God in Mexico, Willie Nelsons Sister's Coming Home/Down At The Corner Beer Joint sowie The Local Memory und Waylon Jennings‘ großartiger Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way, die Hymne des Outlaws schlechthin. © MZ/Qobuz
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CD14,99 €

Country - Erschienen am 23. Februar 1999 | Warner Records

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Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1990 | Geffen*

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"I defend The Hard Way to the death, because I almost died in the process of making it," Steve Earle told a reporter in 2000, and he wasn't just being melodramatic. Earle's well-documented addiction to heroin and cocaine was spiraling out of control in 1990 while he was holed up in Memphis recording The Hard Way. And while his 1988 album Copperhead Road showed him moving away from country and more toward hard rock -- and earned him a minor crossover hit in the process -- his record label was hoping for a major commercial breakthrough so that his sales might begin to match his good press. The resulting album is a bit of a mess, often sloppy and overbearing, where his country sides had been dynamic and precise, and Earle's voice was starting to show the strain of his lifestyle. Even his songwriting, usually peerless, wasn't at its best here, with "When the People Find Out," "Regular Guy," and "Justice in Ontario" sounding like they were tossed together fast to round out the album (the latter sounds like a transparent stroke to his Canadian fan base, where Copperhead Road went multi-platinum). But even his weakest studio album has plenty to recommend it, the all-too-biographical "Have Mercy" and "West Nashville Boogie," and "Billy Austin," a deeply moving ballad about a man on death row. The Hard Way isn't much of an album by Earle's standards, but it's still got enough heart, soul, and fire to prove Earle couldn't throw away his talent, no matter how hard he tried. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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Country - Erschienen am 24. August 2004 | Warner Records

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CD1,49 €

Folk - Erschienen am 29. September 2020 | New West Records

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Country - Erschienen am 24. September 2002 | Warner Records

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Country - Erschienen am 12. Mai 2009 | New West Records

In his brief liner sketch on this album of Townes Van Zandt covers, songwriter Steve Earle writes: "I always read everything Townes told me to read. All of us did; we who followed him around, or simply bided our time in places along his migratory path, for we were indeed a cult, in the strictest sense of the word, with Townes at its ever shifting center." While what it was he read isn't worth spoiling here, it's the last part of that long sentence that really matters. Van Zandt inspired a cult, and an even bigger list of pale imitators. Earle may lionize the man and the artist (hence the tribute record), and may have even begun as an imitator, but he became something else entirely -- an iconoclastic (and iconic) artist and producer in his own right who can interpret these songs as such. Van Zandt may have indeed been Earle's "schoolmaster," but it's Earle who does Van Zandt's artistic legend justice in these 15 diverse, yet stripped down performances of his songs. Many of the choices are obvious: "Pancho and Lefty," "To Live Is to Fly," "White Freightliner Blues," "Delta Momma Blues,"and "Don't Take It Too Bad" among them. Some would be less so, save for an artist of Earle's particular vision and world bent: "Mr. Mudd and Mr. Gold," "Rake," "Marie," "Colorado Girl," and "(Quicksilver Daydreams Of) Maria." That said, none of these arrangements are predictable, and yet all of them work. Earle's approach is very basic with some interesting twists and turns. Acoustic guitars, upright basses, mandolin, Dobro, banjo, fiddle, and mandola sit alongside electric guitars (thanks to Rage Against the Machine's Tom Morello) and basses, harmonium, and effects. The distorted blues harp and hand percussion on "Where I Lead Me," is an excellent touch, but the megaphone vocals, ambient and feedback noise, and drum loops and electric guitar crunch on "Lungs" make it sound more like Black 47 covering Van Zandt. The reverb and loops on "Loretta" juxtapose beautifully against the acoustic guitars and the fiddle. The version of "Marie" is less harrowing than its author's; it feels more third-person narrative than first-person horror story -- thank goodness. "White Freightliner Blues" captures the free-in-the-wind bluegrass nature Van Zandt intended, perhaps more so than his own world-weary delivery, thanks in large part to Tim O'Brien's mandolin, Darrell Scott's banjo, and Shad Cobb's fiddle. Earle would have had a hard time blowing this record. Certainly, he's closer than most to the material as he was to the man, but more than that he's a great songwriter and an avid folk music enthusiast. He understands lineages and the way the tales get told matter in order for them to live on. That's the easy part; the more mercurial thing is how well he succeeded. Earle made Townes' songs seem like an extension of his own last album, 2007's Washington Square Serenade. The same anything-goes-attitude, the adherence to all kinds of folk music, whether it's from across oceans, terrains, or alleyways, whether its roots are rural or urban, permeates this recording, making it an Earle record most of all; and that is about as fitting a tribute as there is to Van Zandt. © Thom Jurek /TiVo

Der Interpret

Steve Earle im Magazin