Ihr Warenkorb ist leer!

Genre :

Ähnliche Künstler

Die Alben

Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Juli 1957 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung - Hi-Res Audio
Cookin' is the first of four albums derived from the Miles Davis Quintet's fabled extended recording session on October 26, 1956; the concept being that the band would document its vast live-performance catalog in a studio environment, rather than preparing all new tracks for its upcoming long-player. The bounty of material in the band's live sets -- as well as the overwhelming conviction in the quintet's studio sides -- would produce the lion's share of the Cookin', Relaxin', Workin', and Steamin' albums. As these recordings demonstrate, there is an undeniable telepathic cohesion that allows this band -- consisting of Miles Davis (trumpet), John Coltrane (tenor sax), Red Garland (piano), Paul Chambers (bass), and Philly Joe Jones (drums) -- to work so efficiently both on the stage and the studio. This same unifying force is also undoubtedly responsible for the extrasensory dimensions scattered throughout these recordings. The immediate yet somewhat understated ability of each musician to react with ingenuity and precision is expressed in the consistency and singularity of each solo as it is maintained from one musician to the next without the slightest deviation. "Blues by Five" reveals the exceptional symmetry between Davis and Coltrane that allows them to complete each other's thoughts musically. Cookin' features the pairing of "Tune Up/When Lights Are Low" which is, without a doubt, a highlight not only of this mammoth session, but also the entire tenure of Miles Davis' mid-'50s quintet. All the elements converge upon this fundamentally swinging medley. Davis' pure-toned solos and the conversational banter that occurs with Coltrane, and later Garland during "When the Lights Are Low," resound as some of these musicians' finest moments. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Dezember 1959 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet
Ab
HI-RES15,49 €
CD10,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Mai 1961 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet
Ab
HI-RES14,99 €
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 16. September 2019 | RevOla

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES15,49 €
CD10,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. April 1956 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet
Ab
HI-RES48,99 €
CD34,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 23. Mai 2006 | Craft Recordings

Hi-Res
Zwischen November 1955 und Oktober 1956 macht Miles Davis mit seinem ersten Quintett beim Label Prestige gleich eine Reihe mit drei Sessions hintereinander. Es entwickelt sich zu einem kreativen Marathon, den der großartige Rudy Van Gelder in seinem Hackensack Studio in New Jersey aufnimmt, und daraus gehen fünf, natürlich einschlägige Alben der Diskografie des knapp dreißigjährigen Trompeters hervor: Miles: The New Miles Davis Quintet (1956), Cookin’ (1957), Relaxin’ (1958), Workin’ (1959) und Steamin’ (1961). Begleitet wird er dabei vom Pianisten Red Garland, dem Kontrabassisten Paul Chambers, dem Schlagzeuger Philly Joe Jones und dem (damals noch alles andere als vergötterten) Saxofonisten John Coltrane, die damit die Geburtsurkunde des Hard Bop ausstellen, und zwar mit sämtlichen 32 Tracks, die hier chronologisch und in Hi-Res 24 Bit neu gemastert präsentiert werden. Miles Davis’ zweites Quintett, das in der großartigen Geschichte des Jazz gerne als Höhepunkt seines Pantheons beschrieben wird (zwischen 1965 und 1968 mit Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, Tony Williams und Wayne Shorter), sollte diese Band der Mitte der 50er Jahre nicht in den Schatten stellen, denn sie ist keinesfalls weniger wichtig. Miles’ nüchterner Stil, die originelle Komplexität von Coltranes Beitrag und Garlands treffende Einlagen ergeben umwerfende Versionen von Stücken, die teils zu den beliebtesten, teils zu den originellsten zählen. Einfach unverzichtbar. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Mai 1961 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet
Although chronologically the last to be issued, this collection includes some of the best performances from the tapes which would produce the albums Cookin', Relaxin', Workin', and ultimately, Steamin'. A primary consideration of these fruitful sessions is the caliber of musicians -- Miles Davis (trumpet), Red Garland (piano), John Coltrane (tenor sax), and Philly Joe Jones (drums) -- who were basically doing their stage act in the studio. As actively performing musicians, the material they are most intimate with would be their live repertoire. Likewise, what more obvious place than a studio is there to capture every inescapable audible nuance of the combo's musical group mind. The end results are consistently astonishing. At the center of Steamin', as with most outings by this band, are the group improvisations which consist of solo upon solo of arguably the sweetest and otherwise most swinging interactions known to have existed between musicians. "Surrey With the Fringe on Top" is passed between the mates like an old joke. Garland compliments threads started by Davis and Coltrane as their seamless interaction yields a stream of strikingly lyrical passages. There are two well-placed nods to fellow bop pioneers Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie on a revision of their "Salt Peanuts." Philly Joe Jones' mimicking cymbal speak -- which replicates Gillespie's original vocals -- is nothing short of genius. This rendition is definitely as crazy and unpredictable here as the original. Thelonious Monk also gets kudos on "Well, You Needn't." This quintet makes short work of the intricacies of the arrangement, adding the double horn lead on the choruses and ultimately redefining this jazz standard. Although there is no original material on Steamin', it may best represent the ability of the Miles Davis quintet to take standards and rebuild them to suit their qualifications. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
Ab
CD13,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1989 | Prestige

Ab
HI-RES4,99 €
CD4,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1958 | BnF Collection

Hi-Res Booklet
Ab
HI-RES21,49 €
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Juli 1957 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet
Ab
HI-RES13,49 €
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. März 1958 | Prestige

Hi-Res Booklet
Relaxin' features the Miles Davis Quintet in a pair of legendary recording dates -- from May and October of 1956 -- which would generate enough music to produce four separate long-players: Cookin', Relaxin', Workin', and Steamin'. Each of these is considered not only to be among the pinnacle of Davis' work, but of the entire bop subgenre as well. As with the other titles, Relaxin' contains a variety of material which the band had concurrently been performing in their concert appearances. In a brilliant stroke of time conservation, the scheme was hatched for the quintet -- who includes: Davis (trumpet), John Coltrane (tenor sax), Philly Joe Jones (drums), and Red Garland (piano) -- to perform the equivalent of their live repertoire in the studio for eventual release. The results are consistently superior both in terms of song selection as well as performance. The solid nature of the unit as a singular musical force is immediately apparent. "If I Were a Bell" -- from the play Guys and Dolls -- includes some remarkable soloing via Coltrane and Garland. Davis' solos are additionally impressive, as they're derived from the same four-note motive as the melody. Hearing the many variations that he comes up with throughout the song conveys how intrigued Davis must have been by the tune, as it stayed in his performance repertoire for decades. Tracks such as "You're My Everything" and "Oleo" highlight the synchronic nature of Davis and Coltrane as they carry each other's melodies while trading off solos. The steady syncopation of Philly Joe Jones keeps the rhythms tight and the delicate interplay all the more conspicuous. Relaxin' offers something for every degree of jazz enthusiast. Likewise, the quintet's recordings provide a tremendous introduction for the curious jazz consumer. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
Ab
CD4,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 15. Februar 2021 | Poems of Jazz

Ab
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Dezember 1959 | Prestige

Workin' is the third in a series of four featuring the classic Miles Davis Quintet: Davis (trumpet), John Coltrane (tenor sax), Red Garland (piano), and Philly Joe Jones (drums). Like its predecessors Cookin' and Relaxin', Workin' is the product of not one -- as mythology would claim -- but two massively productive recording sessions in May and October of 1956, respectively. Contradicting the standard methodology of preparing fresh material for upcoming albums, Davis and company used their far more intimate knowledge of the tunes the quintet was performing live to inform their studio recordings. As was often the case with Davis, the antithesis of the norm is the rule. Armed with some staggering original compositions, pop standards, show tunes, and the occasional jazz cover, Workin' is the quintessence of group participation. Davis, as well as Coltrane, actually contributes compositions as well as mesmerizing performances to the album. The band's interaction on "Four" extends the assertion that suggests this quintet plays with the consistency of a single, albeit ten-armed, musician. One needs listen no further than the stream of solos from Davis, Coltrane, Garland, and Jones, with Paul Chambers chasing along with his rhythmic metronome. Beneath the smoldering bop of "Trane's Blues" are some challenging chord progressions that are tossed from musician to musician with deceptive ease. Chambers' solo stands as one of his defining contributions to this band. In sly acknowledgment to the live shows from which these studio recording sessions were inspired, Davis concludes both sets (read: album sides) with "The Theme" -- a brief and mostly improvised tune -- indicating to patrons that the tab must be settled. In this case, settling the tab might include checking out Steamin', the final Miles Davis Quintet recording to have been culled from these historic sessions. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
Ab
CD4,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 21. Juli 2018 | Music City Entertainment

Ab
CD8,09 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 31. Mai 2007 | edel records

Ab
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Januar 0 | Prestige

Booklet
The Very Best of the Miles Davis Quintet features tracks the legendary jazz trumpeter recorded with engineer Rudy Van Gelder for the Prestige label in the 1950s. Included are such cuts as "Oleo," "Four," "My Funny Valentine," "In Your Own Sweet Way," and more. These are superb, swinging acoustic jazz sessions from Davis' classic hard bop period. © Matt Collar /TiVo
Ab
HI-RES11,99 €
CD7,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Mai 2013 | Trunk Records

Hi-Res
Ab
CD26,49 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2006 | Prestige

Ab
CD14,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 1. Juli 1957 | Prestige

Cookin' is the first of four albums derived from the Miles Davis Quintet's fabled extended recording session on October 26, 1956; the concept being that the band would document its vast live-performance catalog in a studio environment, rather than preparing all new tracks for its upcoming long-player. The bounty of material in the band's live sets -- as well as the overwhelming conviction in the quintet's studio sides -- would produce the lion's share of the Cookin', Relaxin', Workin', and Steamin' albums. As these recordings demonstrate, there is an undeniable telepathic cohesion that allows this band -- consisting of Miles Davis (trumpet), John Coltrane (tenor sax), Red Garland (piano), Paul Chambers (bass), and Philly Joe Jones (drums) -- to work so efficiently both on the stage and the studio. This same unifying force is also undoubtedly responsible for the extrasensory dimensions scattered throughout these recordings. The immediate yet somewhat understated ability of each musician to react with ingenuity and precision is expressed in the consistency and singularity of each solo as it is maintained from one musician to the next without the slightest deviation. "Blues by Five" reveals the exceptional symmetry between Davis and Coltrane that allows them to complete each other's thoughts musically. Cookin' features the pairing of "Tune Up/When Lights Are Low" which is, without a doubt, a highlight not only of this mammoth session, but also the entire tenure of Miles Davis' mid-'50s quintet. All the elements converge upon this fundamentally swinging medley. Davis' pure-toned solos and the conversational banter that occurs with Coltrane, and later Garland during "When the Lights Are Low," resound as some of these musicians' finest moments. © Lindsay Planer /TiVo
Ab
CD9,99 €

Jazz - Erschienen am 18. Oktober 2010 | Efor, S.L