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CD14,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 29. September 2008 | Parlophone Sweden

Auszeichnungen 8/10 de Volume
I'm from Barcelona's first album was called Let Me Introduce My Friends; the follow-up could be titled Let Me Introduce My Melancholy Friends. If the debut was giddy, innocent, and lighter than air, Who Killed Harry Houdini? is glum, confused, and troubled. Instead of songs about stamp collecting and the joys of making music, you get "Music Almost Killed Me" and "Ophelia," which has the telling lyric "He didn't believe in anything/He didn't believe in joy." Instead of cheerful songs about oversleeping and chicken pox, heavy stuff like death and ghosts and tears dominate the lyrics. The band's leader, Emanuel Lundgren, has either had some rough times since the first album or is a very good actor, as the songs reflect a tortured soul. All throughout the record there's an overcast and moody feel that even the poppiest, peppiest song, "Paper Planes," can't break through (and it doesn't help that the song is about the dehumanizing effects of city living). Just knowing that the album isn't the pure blast of sunshine that the debut was might be enough to turn off the group's fans in dispirited droves. Hopefully that won't happen, because it turns out that the band does melancholy quite well, using dynamics and pacing to keep things from getting too gloomy and giving the most depressed songs the liveliest backing -- the rocked-out "Houdini" or the hooky-as-anything-on-the-first-album "Mingus," for example. And there is some hope among the teardrops and sighs, like "Mingus"' rallying cry "In my heart still a kid" or a song about the power of music to free you from your troubles for a while ("Headphones"). It helps too that Lundgren's producing and arranging skills have grown; the production is clearer and the arrangements show a lighter touch. He doesn't call in the vocal choruses on every song, and instead picks their spots carefully. The instrumentation is also more restrained; there are large stretches of sparseness within the songs, fitting the somber mood of the lyrics perfectly. It's still a unique sound when the whole band gets together and makes a lovely racket (as on "Rufus" or the very Phil Spector-ish "Andy"), but the gimmick of the huge band can't hide the fact that there is some real stuff going on behind the scenes. All the emotion and soulful melancholy on display is a shock, and it may take a few spins to get past the feeling that the band is just too different from the happy-go-lucky souls who made Let Me Introduce My Friends, that they are now too gloomy to be enjoyed any longer. But if you give Who Killed Harry Houdini? a serious listen and can get past the initial surprise and mild disappointment, the quiet beauty of the songs, the tender performances, and the beaten down but not broken soul of Emanuel Lundgren are enough to break your heart. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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CD13,49 €

Pop - Erschienen am 26. April 2006 | Parlophone Sweden

"Now you're from Barcelona too!" Keine 40 Minuten und die Herkunft ist eine andere. Schuld daran tragen I'm From Barcelona aus Jönköping, Schweden. 29 Menschen, die sich anschicken, die Kindheit zurückzuerobern. An vorderster Front steht mit der Gitarre am Mikrofon Emanuel Lundgren. "Let Me Introduce My Friends" heißt das Debüt und der Ankündigung folgen derer elf. Elf Freunde für einen heißen Sommer, den folgenden goldenen Herbst, schneereichen Winter und kunterbunten Frühling. Elf Freunde, die man nicht mehr loslassen möchte, wenn sie erst einmal über die Ohren direkt ins Herz gewandert sind. Elf Freunde der Polyphonie, befeuert von Euphorie, verwirklichen Lied für Lied die Harmonie mit dem prägnantesten "Nanana" seit Opus. Spätestens an dieser Stelle bitte den Verstand aus- und das Herz einschalten, denn genau darauf zielt die Gruppe ab. "We'll aim for the stars We'll aim for your heart when the night comes And we'll bring you love You'll be one of us when the night comes" (We're From Barcelona) Treffer! Gerade als im Frühling die Blumenwelt in voller Blüte erstrahlte, kursierten diese Zeilen mitsamt Melodie als Video durch das Internet. "We're From Barcelona" heißt das Lied und nach einem kurzen Stirnrunzeln, was das denn nun zu bedeuten hätte, ertappt man sich dabei, wie der Kopf von links nach rechts zur Musik mitwippt. Bei der herzerfrischenden Wärme dieser Worte konnte der Sommer ruhig kommen. Und er kam, mit ihm auch Klinsi und dann gingen beide wieder, aber I'm From Barcelona sind geblieben. Schließlich haben sie sich gerade erst ein "Treehouse" gebaut. Mit Platz für jeden. Mit "Nobody can see us, it's a you and me house" bieten sie sicheren Unterschlupf vor Schicksalsschlägen, schlechten Nachrichten oder fiesen Hänseleien. Soll doch die coole Indiepolizei mit Lego oder Playmobil spielen. Die schwedische Rasselbande macht es Peter Pan gleich und weigert sich standhaft, erwachsen zu werden ("This Boy"). Lieber verdingen sie sich mit der Badabababa-Briefmarkensammlung. So ba-ba-ba-na-nal die Texte auch sein mögen - die Themen drehen sich nüchtern betrachtet um den Alltag eines Kindes - zwischen den Zeilen erstrahlt Großartiges. Lundgren gelingt es durch phantasievollen Kinderaugen auf die triste Erwachsenenwelt zu blicken. Dabei bedient er sich der einfachen Worte, die durch die Kehlen der restlichen 28 zu Hymnen reifen. Sie schmieden Fluchtpläne mit Ukulelen-Begleitung ("Jenny"), verfluchen beim Glockenspiel das Verschlafen ("Oversleeping") und schreiben mit Schwung allen ins Poesie-Album: "Barcelona Loves You". I'm From Barcelona machen selbst vor den Windpocken ("Chicken Pox") nicht halt und setzen sich musikalisch ans Bett derer, die sich mit dieser Krankheit rumschlagen, denn "You can't have it once you've had it". Wer nicht genug von (den) Schweden bekommen kann, darf sich, gleich nach dem melancholischen "The Saddest Lullaby" ("I can't remember what I did, I fell asleep and wet my bed") noch über einen Hidden Track in schwedischer Sprache freuen. Aber dann ist das Pop-Nimmerland schon durchwandert. Doch I'm From Barcelona haben mit Rec & Play die Lösung parat: "Please press my rec and play 'cause I want to save this moment This will be my favourite song This will be my favourite album." © Laut
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CD13,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 25. März 2015 | WM Sweden

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CD4,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 10. Februar 2006 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 4. August 2006 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 17. Juli 2015 | WM Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 2. Februar 2015 | WM Sweden

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CD14,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 28. März 2011 | Parlophone Sweden

Sometime after the release of I’m from Barcelona's melancholy to the point of tears Who Killed Harry Houdini? album, life must have gotten better for the band’s leader, Emanuel Lundgren. Released in 2011, Forever Today restores the sunny disposition and breezily melodic attitude of their debut record, with only an occasional cloud looming overhead, but also a deeper emotional context and impact. Recorded live in two sessions, the record has a marvelously loose and unaffected sound as the huge band (22 members strong) fills in the tunes with horns, percussion, and group vocals. Lundgren has become a master of fitting the pieces together to make the ensemble sound both innocently intimate and impressively large when the occasion demands. His vocals, too, have become stronger and more expressive. With the sound and voices, the songs could be a little weak and the album would still make for nice background music on a warm summer day. They are quite strong, though, mostly leaping out of the speakers and straight into your memory bank. Starting off with the incredibly buoyant and summery "Charlie Parker," the album bursts to life like the first light of the morning shining through the blinds. The next couple songs also blind you with sunbeams. "Get in Line"’s bubbling dance beats and chanted chorus are incredibly sticky and light, and as for the barrelhouse piano and ba-ba-ba backing vocals of "Battleships" and the fragile hopes and tender bells of "Always Spring" -- they're almost too much, almost too joyous and pretty to handle. Lundgren’s heart isn’t on his sleeve; it’s on yours, beating away like crazy. The rest of the album barely lets up, with the heavenly pop hits coming one after the other. Between the nakedly honest vocals, the power of the massed voices, and the tenderness underlying the music and melodies, Forever Today is a perfect blend of the lighthearted joy of the debut record and the weary gloom of Houdini. Lundgren and crew may have lost some of the buzz they initially had when the band first started, but they’ve gained grace and emotional strength in return. That’s a pretty good trade, and for the fans who have stuck with them, it makes Forever Today their most satisfying record to date. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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CD4,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 30. Januar 2011 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 16. September 2011 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 6. Februar 2012 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD4,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 19. Oktober 2007 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 13. Juli 2007 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 15. August 2008 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 11. April 2011 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 11. April 2011 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 7. April 2006 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,99 €

Pop - Erschienen am 7. April 2006 | Parlophone Sweden

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CD2,29 €

Pop - Erschienen am 17. Februar 2006 | Parlophone Sweden