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Ane Diaz|Despechada

Despechada

Ane Diaz

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Idioma disponible: inglés

Despechada may be Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter Ane Diaz's debut album, but she is a seasoned veteran of the indie music scene. The Jim White-produced set appears on Rain Phoenix's LaunchLeft label. Diaz, Phoenix, and her late brother, River, all played together in Aleka's Attic. She and Rain also played in Causey Way. In 1998, Diaz sang on R.E.M.'s Monster, and in 2001, she founded, fronted, and produced bilingual indie rockers Producto, who released three numbered studio albums between 2002 and 2007. Phoenix produced Diaz's Venezuela EP in 2020. Despechada offers ten thoroughly re-envisioned Venezuelan folk songs from the 20th century. According to Diaz, these are among the first songs she heard and learned to sing; they were chosen by her mother. Though often employed metaphorically, the album's songs share a common thread: Diaz's fear of forgetting her cherished memories of Venezuela and its struggles. Opener "Clavelito Colorado," the set's third single, is an excellent case in point. Along with a drum kit and organic percussion, the song utilizes a doleful, sparse electric guitar, ambient atmospherics, and her reverbed vocal. While the lyrics recount the life and hardships of a cowboy, Diaz's grief-tinged singing offers the lyrics as a metaphor for missing her home country in general and Caracas specifically. First single "Pueblos Tristes" melds jazz, urban, and Latin soul in a deep, rhythmically trancelike lament for her childhood and country amid horns, keyboards, clarinet, bass, and percussion. The staggered brass frames Diaz's mellifluous singing voice as a distorted bluesy guitar highlights her lines. "El Colibri" ("The Hummingbird") is a lithe, shimmering ballad layered with marimbas, slide guitars, pillowy keyboards, and percussion. Despite a somewhat jaunty melody, the deeply metaphorical lyrics are full of anguish. The song is, on the surface, about a hummingbird who dies trying to rescue a flower that fell into the river; for Diaz, it is seeing the suffering of Venezuelans whose lives were snuffed out in resisting an oppressive government regime. With layered percussion, "Carmela" weds rootsy salsa, tango, and bolero with handclaps, melodicas, and soaring trumpets in a kinetic anthem. Her reading of "Fulgida Luna" ("Bright Moon") uses modern instrumentation in an otherwise reverent take on the recording by Venezuelan singer Alfredo Sadel. Using a tres, gut-string bass, tempered brass and reeds, and a slide guitar, she nonetheless captures the elegance and tenderness in the original. "Angelitos Negros" was a poem by Andrés Eloy Blanco set to music by Manuel Alvarez Renteria. Diaz's arrangement references both the 1942 Toña la Negra version and Los Olimareños' '90s recording amid tasteful interplay between clarinet and electric guitar above a minimal bassline and incessant, brushed snare beats. Her forlorn yet inspired singing delivers a scathing indictment of institutional racism. Despechada is riveting. Diaz's indie take on traditional music is at once innovative, strong, and vulnerable. She aspires to reflect the urgency and relevancy in these songs for the 21st century with sensitive instrumentation, intuitive production, and an artist's heart.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

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Despechada

Ane Diaz

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1
Clavelito Colorado
00:03:27

Simón Díaz, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

2
Pueblos Tristes
00:03:36

Otilio Galindez, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

3
Mi Nostalgia
00:01:59

Ane Diaz, MainArtist - Dámaso García, Writer

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

4
El Colibri
00:03:06

PUBLIC DOMAIN, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

5
Carmela
00:03:35

PUBLIC DOMAIN, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

6
Fulgida Luna
00:02:59

Vicente Emilio Sojo, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist - Elías Miguel Zamora Bolívar, Writer - Mariano Carrera Castillo, Writer

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

7
Mi Negra
00:01:43

PUBLIC DOMAIN, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

8
Angelitos Negros
00:03:57

Andres Eloy Blanco, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist - Manuel Alvarez “Maciste” Renteria, Writer

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

9
Sombras de los Medanos
00:03:42

Rafael Sánchez López, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

10
Duerme mi Negrito
00:03:32

PUBLIC DOMAIN, Writer - Ane Diaz, MainArtist

© 2023 LaunchLeft ℗ 2023 LaunchLeft

Presentación del Álbum

Despechada may be Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter Ane Diaz's debut album, but she is a seasoned veteran of the indie music scene. The Jim White-produced set appears on Rain Phoenix's LaunchLeft label. Diaz, Phoenix, and her late brother, River, all played together in Aleka's Attic. She and Rain also played in Causey Way. In 1998, Diaz sang on R.E.M.'s Monster, and in 2001, she founded, fronted, and produced bilingual indie rockers Producto, who released three numbered studio albums between 2002 and 2007. Phoenix produced Diaz's Venezuela EP in 2020. Despechada offers ten thoroughly re-envisioned Venezuelan folk songs from the 20th century. According to Diaz, these are among the first songs she heard and learned to sing; they were chosen by her mother. Though often employed metaphorically, the album's songs share a common thread: Diaz's fear of forgetting her cherished memories of Venezuela and its struggles. Opener "Clavelito Colorado," the set's third single, is an excellent case in point. Along with a drum kit and organic percussion, the song utilizes a doleful, sparse electric guitar, ambient atmospherics, and her reverbed vocal. While the lyrics recount the life and hardships of a cowboy, Diaz's grief-tinged singing offers the lyrics as a metaphor for missing her home country in general and Caracas specifically. First single "Pueblos Tristes" melds jazz, urban, and Latin soul in a deep, rhythmically trancelike lament for her childhood and country amid horns, keyboards, clarinet, bass, and percussion. The staggered brass frames Diaz's mellifluous singing voice as a distorted bluesy guitar highlights her lines. "El Colibri" ("The Hummingbird") is a lithe, shimmering ballad layered with marimbas, slide guitars, pillowy keyboards, and percussion. Despite a somewhat jaunty melody, the deeply metaphorical lyrics are full of anguish. The song is, on the surface, about a hummingbird who dies trying to rescue a flower that fell into the river; for Diaz, it is seeing the suffering of Venezuelans whose lives were snuffed out in resisting an oppressive government regime. With layered percussion, "Carmela" weds rootsy salsa, tango, and bolero with handclaps, melodicas, and soaring trumpets in a kinetic anthem. Her reading of "Fulgida Luna" ("Bright Moon") uses modern instrumentation in an otherwise reverent take on the recording by Venezuelan singer Alfredo Sadel. Using a tres, gut-string bass, tempered brass and reeds, and a slide guitar, she nonetheless captures the elegance and tenderness in the original. "Angelitos Negros" was a poem by Andrés Eloy Blanco set to music by Manuel Alvarez Renteria. Diaz's arrangement references both the 1942 Toña la Negra version and Los Olimareños' '90s recording amid tasteful interplay between clarinet and electric guitar above a minimal bassline and incessant, brushed snare beats. Her forlorn yet inspired singing delivers a scathing indictment of institutional racism. Despechada is riveting. Diaz's indie take on traditional music is at once innovative, strong, and vulnerable. She aspires to reflect the urgency and relevancy in these songs for the 21st century with sensitive instrumentation, intuitive production, and an artist's heart.
© Thom Jurek /TiVo

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