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Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2013 | Hear Music

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CD20,49 Fr.

Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 4. Juni 2013 | Hear Music

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Termed a "Southern gothic musical," Ghost Brothers of Darkland County was scripted by novelist Stephen King with the music coming from maverick heartland rocker John Mellencamp, a collaboration a bit left-field for both artists. This set includes Mellencamp's songs interspersed with key dialogue from King's libretto, and while the story might be too complex -- essentially, it's the tale of two brothers involved in a murder/suicide whose ghosts haunt an isolated cabin and whose tragic deeds and consequent fate seems about to be repeated by their living nephews -- to be truly appreciated in single-disc form like this, so it's Mellencamp's songs, sung by the likes of Elvis Costello, Neko Case, Sheryl Crow, Dave and Phil Alvin (real-life brothers whose estrangement with each other ended while working on this project), Taj Mahal, Ryan Bingham, Clyde Mulroney, Rosanne Cash, and Kris Kristofferson (Mellencamp only sings on one song here, the summing-it-up last track "Truth") that are really left to carry things. They certainly work as songs, and may well be among the best Mellencamp has ever written, while the overall sound of the whole musical suite, crafted by T-Bone Burnett, is kind of like a sparse and shined-up version of a late-period Tom Waits album, due in part to the presence of multi-instrumentalist Marc Ribot on most of the tracks, and the tight, spare rhythm section of Jay Bellerose on drums and David Piltch on bass. The performances? Elvis Costello sounds gleeful and sinful on "That's Me" (identity and fulfillment are key themes of Ghost Brothers of Darkland Country, that and history's tendency to repeat itself), Neko Case is sassy and sure on "That's Who I Am," Kris Kristofferson sounds old, wise, and weary on "How Many Days," Taj Mahal rages through "Tear This Cabin Down," and Sheryl Crow is confident and cocky on "Jukin'," while Rosanne Cash turns in a delicately worn and wise reading of "You Don't Know Me," and for a story that spans decades and generations, it's obvious that everyone is singing about who they are, who they ought to be, and who they ended up becoming. It's difficult to say how good this musical is just from the songs and pieces of dialogue presented here, but the songs have a weary, inevitable flow to them, as if fate forced them into a dark room with little light or air or chance of redemption. Redemption comes with acceptance of who one is, the songs and story here seem to say, and only then can the real truth about what has happened to anyone really be revealed. It's a ghost story, after all. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2012 | Hear Music

Pop - Erschienen am 3. September 2012 | Hear Music

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Fleetwood Mac was the subject of an all-star tribute back in 1998, when Legacy: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac's Rumours appeared. That full-length album tribute celebrated the Mac's biggest hit in a big way, concentrating entirely on major-label acts like Elton John and Matchbox 20, but 2012's Just Tell Me That You Want Me: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac is decidedly more eccentric, as its title -- a line borrowed from "Tusk" -- no doubt suggests. Apart from Marianne Faithfull and Billy Gibbons, along with Americana singer Trixie Whitley, every band here exists solely within the realm of indie rock and, collectively, there's been a decision to stray from the confines of the standards of the Buckingham/Nicks songbook, with Bob Welch and Peter Green eras almost as well-represented as oddities from Lindsey Buckingham's album tracks. Certainly, the major hits come from Nicks: Antony essays an appropriately florid version of "Landslide," Karen Elson brings a bit of spooky blues to the witchy "Gold Dust Woman" -- a reinvention surpassed by Best Coast's sprightly, insistent "Rhiannon," and the Kills turning "Dreams" into something resembling nightmares. Hooks take a backseat -- only the New Pornographers' "Think About Me" really pushes the power pop angle -- to eerie, dreamy textures, with the Lee Ranaldo Band and J Mascis setting a pitch-perfect keynote with "Albatross," even though it's hardly just guitars here. Tame Impala push "That's All for Everyone" onto waves of analog synths, MGMT give "Future Games" a considerable reworking, Gardens & Villa turn "Gypsy" into electro-pop, and Crystal Ark perform a similar trick with "Tusk," signaling the kind of imagination and depth that make Just Tell Me That You Want Me an unusually satisfying tribute album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD20,49 Fr.

Verschiedenes - Erschienen am 5. November 2012 | Hear Music

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CD24,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 3. September 2012 | Hear Music

Booklet
Fleetwood Mac was the subject of an all-star tribute back in 1998, when Legacy: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac's Rumours appeared. That full-length album tribute celebrated the Mac's biggest hit in a big way, concentrating entirely on major-label acts like Elton John and Matchbox 20, but 2012's Just Tell Me That You Want Me: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac is decidedly more eccentric, as its title -- a line borrowed from "Tusk" -- no doubt suggests. Apart from Marianne Faithfull and Billy Gibbons, along with Americana singer Trixie Whitley, every band here exists solely within the realm of indie rock and, collectively, there's been a decision to stray from the confines of the standards of the Buckingham/Nicks songbook, with Bob Welch and Peter Green eras almost as well-represented as oddities from Lindsey Buckingham's album tracks. Certainly, the major hits come from Nicks: Antony essays an appropriately florid version of "Landslide," Karen Elson brings a bit of spooky blues to the witchy "Gold Dust Woman" -- a reinvention surpassed by Best Coast's sprightly, insistent "Rhiannon," and the Kills turning "Dreams" into something resembling nightmares. Hooks take a backseat -- only the New Pornographers' "Think About Me" really pushes the power pop angle -- to eerie, dreamy textures, with the Lee Ranaldo Band and J Mascis setting a pitch-perfect keynote with "Albatross," even though it's hardly just guitars here. Tame Impala push "That's All for Everyone" onto waves of analog synths, MGMT give "Future Games" a considerable reworking, Gardens & Villa turn "Gypsy" into electro-pop, and Crystal Ark perform a similar trick with "Tusk," signaling the kind of imagination and depth that make Just Tell Me That You Want Me an unusually satisfying tribute album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD20,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2012 | Hear Music

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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2011 | Hear Music

Auszeichnungen Sélection Les Inrocks - 3 étoiles Technikart
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Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2011 | Hear Music

Booklet
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CD1,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2011 | Hear Music

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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 24. Mai 2010 | Hear Music

Booklet
Carole King and James Taylor reuniting isn’t quite a monumental reunion -- they never were an official performing entity, so they never had a falling out, appearing on-stage and on record from time to time since their ‘70s heyday -- but it is a notable one, particularly when they choose to perform at the Troubadour, the L.A. venue so crucial at the start of their stardom, backed by such fellow veterans of the SoCal singer/songwriter scene as guitarist Danny Kortchmar, bassist Leland Sklar, and drummer Russell Kunkel, musicians who supported them the last time they co-headlined the club back in 1971. All this made their series of shared shows in November 2007 an event, albeit a low-key one. King and Taylor embrace their classics -- it seems that there’s not a hit missed between the two of them -- and there’s genuine warmth to the whole show that’s quite appealing. Perhaps there are no surprises here, but any shock would have run counter to the whole spirit of the evening: this is about basking in both nostalgia and friendship, and if you’re on the same wave as the musicians, Live at the Troubadour is enjoyable. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD17,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Hear Music

Booklet
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CD17,99 Fr.

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Hear Music

Booklet
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Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Hear Music

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CD17,99 Fr.

Rock - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2009 | Hear Music

Elvis Costello ist ein musikalisches Chamäleon. Mit einer illustren Musikerschar im Rücken definiert er dieses Mal einen traditionell geprägten Country- und Bluegrass-Klangraum. Diese Abgrenzung ist auch nötig, sie stiftet Kohärenz, entstanden die Stücke doch in unterschiedlichen biografischen Zusammenhängen. Typische Johnny Cash-Nummern, live erprobte Titel, die ihren Feinschliff im Vorprogramm von Bob Dylan erhielten, und Auftragsarbeiten für die Königliche Dänische Oper anlässlich des 200. Geburtstag von Hans Christian Andersen zeigen das breite Kompositionsspektrum. Der Geist von Johnny Cash haucht "Complicated Shadows" Leben ein und lässt es pulsieren: Ein lässiges Single Note-Riff geht in den Beat über, der von einer Mandoline und dem Kick der Bassbegleitung gebildet wird. Die fantastische Dobro-Gitarre soliert herzzerreißend, filigran, aber immer songdienlich. So auch die Violine, die mit eigenständiger Melodieführung oftmals einen Kontrapunkt setzt. Auf der Konzertreise mit Bob Dylan 2007 fügte Costello dem Stück "Sulphur To Sugarcane" entlang der Reiseroute entsprechende Verse hinzu, die sich augenzwinkernd mit den Stationen beschäftigten. Beispiel gefällig? "The Woman in Poughkeepsie take their clothes off when their tipsy". Narrative Lyrics eingepackt in eine simple Strophenform erzählen die Geschichte eines stadtbekannten Frauenhelds, der misstrauischen Ehemännern einen Drink spendiert, um ungehindert mit den Ehefrauen herumzuschäkern. Gerade die Andersen-Kompositionen strotzen nur so vor musikalischem Einfallsreichtum. In allen Farben schillern die Harmonien, inszenieren eine Programmatik und führen zu einer fantastischen Deckungsgleichheit von Text und Musik. Bei allem Hang zum Kunstlied und Durchdachtheit bieten die Stücke dennoch genügend Raum zur Improvisation. Die Aufnahmen in Nashville schloss die Band in nur drei Tagen ab, besser geht's nicht. Die Symbolik des Covers, der mysteriöse Albumtitel und die Lyrics ergeben ein untrennbar miteinander verwobenes Gesamtkonzept: Sklaverei, Sünde, Scham, Schuld, und über allem thront als einzig Absolutes die Liebe, als zentraler Fluchtpunkt und Ziel. Wie könnte man eine unerwiderte Liebe besser ausdrücken, als in "She handed me a mirror", laut Costello "ein Lied über all die Pechvögel, die in eine für sie unerreichbare Frau verliebt sind"? Der unglücklich Verliebte bekommt auf die Frage‚ 'warum seine Liebe unerwidert bleibt' als Begründung einen Spiegel ausgehändigt. Die beiden abschließenden Stücke sind jedoch ein Manifest für Treue: Im letzten Song singt der in dritter Ehe Verheiratete - von einem Walzer-Takt geführt - dass er trotz des Aufrufs zum Partnerwechsel seine Geliebte bei einem erneuten Wiedersehen nicht wieder hergeben möchte. Einziges Manko: Costello bewirbt sich öfter als dem Hörer lieb ist für den Bob Dylan-Preis für schiefe Intonation. Glücklicherweise hat er mit Jim Lauderdale einen Top-Satzsänger zur Hand, der den Leadgesang ein ums andere Mal von der schiefen Bahn wegholt. Roh und dynamisch von T Bone Burnett produziert, lebt jede Note, jeder Spannungsbogen, kommt jede dynamische Nuance zur Geltung. Was leise sein soll, klingt auch leise. Eine Weile lang schwebt man nach dem Hören über dem Lärm des Daseins. Leider werden auch diesmal wohl ausschließlich Die-Hard-Fans oder dem Sound verbundene Bluegrasser und Countryliebhaber mit einer leichten Affinität zu jazzigen Abweichungen das neueste Costello-Werk abgreifen. © Laut
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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 4. August 2009 | Hear Music

Listen to any one track on Guyanese-Canadian singer/songwriter Anjulie's self-titled debut, and it appears easy to pigeonhole her, to call her the next artist "X." The only problem with that lazy categorization is that, on song after song, that "artist X" changes. Opening track and single "Boom" conjures up aughts genre-benders like Santigold; the song's a sultry masala of miscellaneous styles, throwing dark bossa nova, Morricone-esque flourishes, Bond themes, acid jazz, and an insanely catchy half-scat hook all into one boiling-over (and madly sexy) musical pot. "Boom" ends in a flash and her audience is cast into the fluttering, deliciously sugary pop soul of Nelly Furtado on the mournful, yet batty-eyed "Rain." Next, on "Some Dumb Girl," Anjulie channels Minnie Riperton at her most slinkily seductive, on a steamy piece of throwback '70s Philly soul-disco pop. And on and on it goes, on an alluring coming out of a record as hints of Laura Nyro, Regina Spektor, Beyoncé, and even Ben Folds sneak into the chilled mix. Anjulie is produced by her songwriting partner Jon Levine, ex-Philosopher Kings, the underappreciated '90s alternative soulsters whose ultra-slick R&B went down like silken chocolate, and the LP's smooth sound certainly echoes that of his old mates. While the record's not without its rough patches, dully derivative moments, and false notes ("Fatal Attraction" gets a bit silly with its tacked-on breathy hook), Anjulie is quite impressive as an opening salvo from a talented musical collagist whose minor flurry of hype is well-warranted. © Jason Thurston /TiVo
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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2009 | Hear Music

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CD17,99 Fr.

Rock - Erschienen am 15. Juli 2008 | Hear Music

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CD2,99 Fr.

Blues - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2009 | Hear Music

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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 4. August 2009 | Hear Music

Booklet
Listen to any one track on Guyanese-Canadian singer/songwriter Anjulie's self-titled debut, and it appears easy to pigeonhole her, to call her the next artist "X." The only problem with that lazy categorization is that, on song after song, that "artist X" changes. Opening track and single "Boom" conjures up aughts genre-benders like Santigold; the song's a sultry masala of miscellaneous styles, throwing dark bossa nova, Morricone-esque flourishes, Bond themes, acid jazz, and an insanely catchy half-scat hook all into one boiling-over (and madly sexy) musical pot. "Boom" ends in a flash and her audience is cast into the fluttering, deliciously sugary pop soul of Nelly Furtado on the mournful, yet batty-eyed "Rain." Next, on "Some Dumb Girl," Anjulie channels Minnie Riperton at her most slinkily seductive, on a steamy piece of throwback '70s Philly soul-disco pop. And on and on it goes, on an alluring coming out of a record as hints of Laura Nyro, Regina Spektor, Beyoncé, and even Ben Folds sneak into the chilled mix. Anjulie is produced by her songwriting partner Jon Levine, ex-Philosopher Kings, the underappreciated '90s alternative soulsters whose ultra-slick R&B went down like silken chocolate, and the LP's smooth sound certainly echoes that of his old mates. While the record's not without its rough patches, dully derivative moments, and false notes ("Fatal Attraction" gets a bit silly with its tacked-on breathy hook), Anjulie is quite impressive as an opening salvo from a talented musical collagist whose minor flurry of hype is well-warranted. © Jason Thurston /TiVo