Ihr Warenkorb ist leer!

Genre :

Ähnliche Künstler

Die Alben

Ab
CD1,59 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 6. Juni 2014 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD1,59 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 14. August 2021 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD1,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 7. Juli 2021 | Rabid Records

Ab
HI-RES1,99 Fr.
CD1,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 30. September 2013 | Rabid Records

Hi-Res
Ab
HI-RES1,99 Fr.
CD1,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 9. Juni 2021 | Rabid Records

Hi-Res
Ab
CD1,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 18. Februar 2013 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD2,99 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 14. August 2021 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD2,99 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 14. Oktober 2013 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD3,99 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 23. September 2014 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD4,99 Fr.

Dance - Erschienen am 1. Mai 2009 | DEF

Ab
CD4,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 13. Dezember 2010 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD5,99 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 19. Mai 2014 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD9,99 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 8. Dezember 2014 | Rabid Records

To commemorate the second leg of the Shaking the Habitual tour, the Knife re-recorded several key tracks from that album, as well as choice songs from the rest of their discography, in the style they performed them in concert. Shaken Up Versions ends up being more than just a tour souvenir -- instead, it brings balance, as well as a new perspective, to their entire body of work. Karin and Olof Dreijer don't just make all of the mini-album's songs match their post-Silent Shout mood of frostbitten intensity; even that album's selections, the bookends "We Share Our Mother's Health" and the title track, sound brighter and more animated than they did originally. Rather, Shaken Up Versions bridges the surreally sparkling pop of their early albums and the darker territory they carved out later with engaging results. Deep Cuts' "Got 2 Let U" maintains its funky mischief despite its relatively spare arrangement and Karin Dreijer's untreated singing (though it suggests her vocal chords might be part Silly Putty). Meanwhile, "Without You My Life Would Be Boring," one of Shaking the Habitual's rare pop songs, is warmed up with more acoustic instrumentation, including the steel drums that have been one of the group's mainstays since the beginning. Wisely, the Knife gives Light Asylum's Shannon Funchess the spotlight on a version of Deep Cuts' "Pass This On" that gives a raw intensity to its Scandinavian/Caribbean synth-pop hybrid, as well as on a molten version of the Habitual standout "Stay Out Here" that sounds even more unnerving than the original thanks to layers of jittery drums and vocals. This bracing percussion captures the energy of the Shaking the Habitual live show, which incorporated elements of decidedly mainstream phenomena like karaoke and aerobics along with its avant-garde ambitions. Just as importantly, the album reclaims some of the joy that seemed like it might be a casualty of those ambitions, and may even give fans intimidated by Habitual's foreboding length and darkness a new appreciation for how it fits into the Knife's overall body of work. Refreshing in its conciseness and brightness, Shaken Up Versions embraces change even as it unites the different eras of the Dreijers' music. © Heather Phares /TiVo
Ab
CD15,99 Fr.

Original Soundtrack - Erschienen am 23. November 2003 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD11,49 Fr.

Dance - Erschienen am 17. Februar 2006 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD12,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 11. Oktober 2004 | Rabid Records

Ab
CD12,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 8. April 2013 | Rabid Records

Ein Jahrzehnt ist vergangen, seitdem das schwedische Geschwisterduo Karin Dreijer Andersson und Olof Dreijer in die öffentliche Aufmerksamkeit rückte. Die eigenwillige und ebenso eingängige Single "Pass This On" auf dem The Knife-Zweitling "Deep Cuts" sorgte für offene Ohren und ebnete auch dem Nachfolger "Silent Shout" den Weg zu modernen Klassikern des Genres. Nur - welches Genre? Von Beginn an gestaltet sich das ästhetische Programm der Schweden als ein Irrgarten moderner Tanzmusik. Den Pop nie aus den Augen verlierend, windet sich ihre Musik durch exotische Klänge, Orgien des Verzerrens und, als eine Art beweglicher Mittelpunkt, Karins Gesang. Teils markerschütternd grell, teils aus den Tiefen einer Ursuppe geboren, weist sie die Richtung durch das dauerbewegliche The Knife-Universum. Einen Großteil der vergangenen Dekade jedoch verbringt das Duo im Dasein als Mythos. In Anbetracht von Livegigs im Dunkeln oder hinter Schnabelmasken und kultischen Gegenständen versteckt, erscheint die siebenjährige Pause, in der sie lediglich den weniger beachteten Soundtrack zu einer Charles Darwin-Oper veröffentlichten, als dramaturgisch präzise einstudiert und logisch nachvollziehbar. "Shaking The Habitual" ist nun keineswegs regulierendes Ventil angesammelter kreativer Energie – das Ventil ist mit Veröffentlichung des Albums explodiert. Ungeordnet und wild bricht es über 96 Minuten aus den beiden Schweden heraus. Ihre vierte LP ist weder Rückschau noch Verwaschen des eigenen Stils, sie ist ein musikalisches Surplus, die komplette Überforderung. Zwischen hektischen Percussion-Orgien, geradlinigem Techno-Pop und darbenden Noise-Flächen, gerät "Shaking The Habitual" zur körperlichen Erfahrung. Orientierung bieten lediglich die Gesangsparts Anderssons in Momenten der Ordnung wie sie in "Without You My Life Would Be Boring" oder "Raging Lung" zu finden sind. Auch das Schlussstück "Ready To Lose", das beizeiten an das Fever Ray-Album der Sängerin erinnert, fällt in diese Sparte. Dem ungeordneten Überfluss steht das Zentrum des Albums, "Old Dreams Waiting To Be Realized", antithetisch gegenüber. Mit 19 Minuten macht dieses Kernstück mit dem programmatischen Titel ein Fünftel der Gesamtlaufzeit aus, gestaltet sich aber durch absoluten Minimalismus. Es ist ein klanglicher Ausflug in genau jene oben genannte Ursuppe, in der die alten Träume vor sich hin köcheln. Ohne bestimmte Form wabern sie im Unbewussten gleich der im Track transportierten Klangwelt. Frei jeder Ordnung ergießen sich gedehnte Töne verschiedener Höhe und Färbung ineinander, befreien sich, driften auseinander. Kurze Rhythmuspassagen erweitern den freien Flug, um dann wieder ins Nichts zu verfallen. Auf einer Ebene, die weit über den in The Knife-Kontext allzu oft beschriebenen Elementen von 'Mut' oder 'Provokation' liegen, nehmen Karin Dreijer Andersson und Olof Dreijer ihre lange Absenz selbst als musikalisches Programm. "Shaking The Habitual" ist, von wilder Unordnung und Gegensätzen geprägt, ein direktes Gleichnis des kreativen Schaffens: anstrengend, ohne feste Gesetze und mit brillanten Momenten der Klarheit. © Laut
Ab
CD12,49 Fr.

Electronic - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2001 | Rabid Records

Although it inevitably falls somewhat short of the excellent and utterly original albums that followed it, the Knife's self-titled (and originally self-released) 2001 debut does more than merely hint at the duo's potential. For one thing, it reveals that their strange and idiosyncratic sensibility was fully apparent right from the beginning -- this couldn't possibly be mistaken for the work of any other band. In fact, within The Knife's considerable emotional range, and featuring the same inventive approach to synth programming and textural exploration, it already contains all the stylistic and musical elements that the duo would develop further on their later albums, encompassing both the glistening, off-kilter dance-pop of Deep Cuts and the frosty, otherworldly darkness of Silent Shout. And then of course there's Karin Dreijer's voice, which isn't subjected to nearly as much processing and digital manipulation here as it would be in their later work (except on the absurd, Darth Vader-referencing "A Lung"), but it's a formidable and curiously affecting instrument even in its unadulterated state. There are even some directly traceable elements for the trainspotters -- the dubby drip-like clicks that open Shout's "Like a Pen" are audible on the instrumental "Zapata," while the gently anthemic "Parade" features the lyric "we raise our heads for the color red," which would reappear as one of the more inscrutable lines in "Heartbeats." But as revealing as it may be for fans of their later work, The Knife is an eminently worthwhile listen in its own right. Freewheelingly experimental, but always in an accessible and song-driven fashion, it veers from the industrial rock menace of "I Take Time" to the poignant semi-acoustic fragility of "N.Y. Hotel" to the techno-pop chinoiserie of standout "Kino," with its infectiously chintzy riff and sturdy electro groove. At the time of this release, The Knife must have seemed inexorably indebted to the 1980s, particularly considering Dreijer's oft-remarked vocal similarity to Cyndi Lauper, but in the context of the heavy synthesizer presence that has continued throughout the 2000s it sounds practically prophetic. Even so, the album's largely synthetic soundscape is punctuated by touches of organic instrumentation, often used in unexpected ways -- hushed saxophone harmonies temper the sparse, pointillistic synth-funk of "Neon," while "Parade" blossoms into a rousing Celtic folk march rich with organ and accordion -- striking an affecting balance between human and machine (something that the duo would essentially abandon with the scarily remote, technological aesthetic of Silent Shout.) Lyrically, much of the album is imagistic and elusive, but marked with the Dreijer's characteristic combination of sentiment ("N.Y. Hotel"'s tender farewell), creepiness ("I Just Had to Die"'s ambiguous reference to "watching school girls"), and humor (the yuletide-themed "Reindeer," which is evidently sung from the perspective of one of Santa's elves). © K. Ross Hoffman /TiVo
Ab
CD12,49 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. September 2017 | Rabid Records

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 1. März 2010 | Rabid Records

Download nicht verfügbar
Neulich hat Fever Ray bei den skandinavischen Grammys der Radiostation P3 Guld den Award für die beste Künstlerin gewonnen. Auf der Bühne erschien die eine Hälfte des Avantgarde-Pop-Duos The Knifeverschleiert, in einer Art orientalischem Kostüm. Als sie den Schleier zur Dankesrede hob, kam eine Maske, halb Schwein-Fisch, halb Alien zum Vorschein. Ihre Rede – ein kurzes Röcheln und Stöhnen. Was das sollte? Keine Ahnung. Dabei passte der Auftritt einerseits zur Mystik um die Geschwister Olof Dreijer und Karin Dreijer-Andersson, die als The Knife nur maskiert auftreten und Interviews verweigern. Andererseits hatte das Duo zum 200. Geburtstag von Charles Darwin und der Veröffentlichung seines Werks "Die Entstehung der Arten" auch die Musik zu einer naturwissenschaftlich-emphatischen Evolutions-Oper beigesteuert, die im September 2009 ihre Weltpremiere in Kopenhagen feierte. Was lag also für Dreijer-Andersson näher, diesen Bogen künstlerisch weiterzuspannen, sei es auch bei einer Beauty-Bussi-Gala. Nun ist The Knifes Musik zu der Inszenierung Darwins Kulturrevolution auch als 90-minütiges Doppelalbum erschienen, das sich eher den Regieanweisungen von Kirsten Delmholm verpflichtet fühlt als der hohen Erwartungshaltung des fantastischen Vorgängers "Silent Shout". Hat das Leben einen Sound? Lässt sich die Evolution in Musik überführen? Diese Fragen haben The Knife unter der Mitarbeit der englischen Visual-Pop-Künstlerin Planningtorock und des Berliner Produzenten Mt. Sims beantwortet, indem sie Textfragmente Darwins neu zusammengesetzt haben und darüber einen experimentell-rauschenden Klangteppich haben laufen lassen, der materielle Field Recordings, räumliche Klanginstallationen, Klassik und Elektronikdistorsionen miteinander kreuzt. Geradezu folgerichtig für die Theater-Gattung halten sich The Knife bis auf die elfminütige (!) Single "Colour Of Pigeons" am Gesang auch nahezu bedeckt und überlassen stattdessen Mezzosopranistin Kristina Wahlin Momme, der Schauspielerin Lærke Winther Andersen und dem schwedischen Musiker Jonathan Johansson das Mikrofon. Und deren Intonation innerhalb dieser mitgeschnittenen Galapagos-Exkursion klingt dann für die Ohren ungeschulter Pop-Fans auch nach Oper, nämlich hoch und schrill. Als Songs im weitesten Sinne funktionieren eh nur die letzten fünf Nummern der zweiten CD, die man eh zuerst hören sollte, um nicht allzu enttäuscht zu sein. "Tomorrow, In A Year" ist ein Ausschnitt Hochkultur, das sich nicht darum schert, zu erklären, warum es so ist, wie es klingt. Wer darin nicht Darwin lesen will oder kann, hat Pech gehabt. So werden Musikfans ohne Affinität für Avantgarde-Elektronik und das Abstraktionsvermögen für das zugehörige, experimentelle Theater kaum eine Ahnung davon bekommen, warum dieses entrückte Album mitunter weitaus spannender ist als das oft so gewöhnlich erzählte Kino von Popmusik. © Laut