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CD17,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Universal Music Group International

Auszeichnungen 3F de Télérama - 4 étoiles Rock and Folk
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CD21,99 Fr.

Keltische Musik - Erschienen am 19. Februar 2002 | Columbia

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung
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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 24. Januar 1995 | RCA Victor

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CD30,99 Fr.

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 16. Februar 2006 | RCA Victor - Legacy

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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 22. Februar 1999 | RCA Victor

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CD17,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2012 | Hear Music

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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 17. September 2002 | RCA Victor

In the wake of the success of O Brother Where Art Thou?, this collaboration between Irish supergroup the Chieftains and some of country's best known neo-traditionalists was almost inevitable. Luckily for all involved, the idea actually makes a lot of sense too. Most of the ballads and work songs that were born in the Appalachian hills have deep roots in the traditional music of Scotland, England, and Ireland, and crying fiddles, ringing banjos, and tales of drunkenness, outlaws, and loss are woven deeply into both cultures' musical heritage. Through most of the tracks, the instrumentals work better than the vocal tracks, but the droning "Katie Dear" (performed by the impeccable Gillian Welch and David Rawlings) and Alison Krauss' mournful "Molly Bán" are both heart-wrenching and beautiful no matter what continent they came from. Other highlights include Béla Fleck's firey banjo rolls on a trio of reels, and the underrated Patty Griffin's turn on the traditional "Whole Heap of Little Horses." While the interpretations on Down the Old Plank Road turn out to be successes, the sum of these collaborations aren't as good as the Chieftains doing what they do best: traditional Irish music with subtle contemporary flourishes. Still, anyone who enjoys the music of any of the guests on this release will be pleased with the entire package; sweet and mournful, historic and unprecedented, fun and engaging all rolled into one. © Zac Johnson /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 22. Februar 2000 | RCA Victor

Ever since 1988's Irish Heartbeat, the Chieftains relied on guest artists on their own albums, ranging from Celtic peers to pop, rock, and country superstars, since the cameos virtually guaranteed that each new album would be treated as an event. That's also the case with 2000's Water from the Well, a traditional Irish folk/Celtic album filled with guest spots by traditional Celtic musicians. That might not seem like an anomaly from a band that had a great deal to do with the popularization of Celtic music in the last 25 years of the 20th century, but it had been a while since the bandmembers devoted themselves to the music so completely as they do here. Does it work? Yes. This is a rare incident where a preponderance of guests -- and there are over 20 cameos here -- doesn't result in a sluggish, carefully considered record. Not only do the Chieftains have a great time embracing traditional dances and ballads, but their guests invigorate them, resulting in a very strong listen. It's the kind of record that only a seasoned band could make; it might not be groundbreaking or definitive, but it is an accomplished yet enthusiastic set of songs where the joy is in the little details. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD30,99 Fr.

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 21. Februar 2006 | RCA Victor - Legacy

RCA Legacy's The Essential Chieftains breaks the legendary Irish collective's career into two sections. The first disc focuses on 18 of the group's finest traditional works like "Boil the Breakfast Early," "The Wind That Shakes the Barley/The Reel with the Beryle," and "Donegal Set," while the second disc relies on 17 of the band's billion or so collaborations, such as "Mo Ghile Mear" with Sting, "Shenandoah" with Van Morrison, and "Foggy Dew" with Sinéad O'Connor. At this point in their long and storied career -- 40 albums over 40 years -- a truly comprehensive anthology would have required the box set to end all box sets, but this Essential collection is fair enough for purists and accessible enough for casual fans to fill the void until that time comes. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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CD17,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Hear Music

Booklet
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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 9. September 2003 | RCA Victor

In 2002, the legendary and insanely prolific Irish ensemble the Chieftains released Down the Old Plank Road: The Nashville Sessions. Utilizing American icons like Ricky Skaggs, Del McCoury, and Lyle Lovett alongside the blossoming Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, their interpretations of traditional Irish and Appalachian staples yielded a surprisingly lucid bounty. Not surprisingly, the sessions also yielded another record. Further Down the Old Plank Road: The Nashville Sessions follows the same thread on the neo-traditional loom, pitting the Celtic heroes against such heavyweights as Doc Watson, John Prine, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, while incorporating younger artists like Nickel Creek. The Chieftains, possibly the tightest veteran band still performing, have made a career out of effortless creativity and sheer enthusiasm, especially for projects like this one. On the gorgeous "Chief O'Neil's Hornpipe," Paddy Maloney's bittersweet piping effortlessly segues into Chet Atkins' understated picking. It's like listening to a couple of old friends sharing a beer on a Sunday evening. Emmylou Harris croons "Lambs in the Greenfield" that'll leave a lump in your throat, and Tim O'Brien tears through a version of "Shady Grove," fueled by the ancestral flames of its birth. Only the forced soul of Allison Moorer's "Hick's Farewell" and Don Williams' generic rendering of the classic ballad "Wild Mountain Thyme" keep Further Down the Old Plank Road from being a major achievement. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 5. März 2002 | RCA Victor

In the Chieftains' four decades of recording, they've changed labels a handful of times, and each label has seen fit to record at least one or two collections of the band's output under their tenure. At this point they have so many best-ofs and greatest-hits compilations, it's tough for the listener to know the best of what they're actually hearing. New millennium -- new collection: the band's longtime label, RCA Victor, has done the Celtic community a favor by releasing a collection that deals more with the band's journey through their different phases as opposed to trying to reassemble a hits package. The end result is almost like listening to a radio station that only plays Chieftains songs. There are some live tracks, their countrified romp through "Cotton-Eyed Joe"; Van Morrison's adult-contemporary "Shenandoah"; an unusual introduction of the bandmembers in Chinese; appearances from Sting, Diana Krall, and Art Garfunkel; and a couple of new recordings. The breezy cover of "Morning Has Broken" fares better than the hybridized "Redemption Song" (in fact, it's a challenge to think of any instances of a successful Celtic/reggae alloy). The album will be enjoyed by Chieftains fans as a fun collection of songs they have never heard back-to-back before, and those looking for a greatest-hits collection will have plenty of other places to look. © Zac Johnson /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 9. September 2003 | RCA Victor

In 2002, the legendary and insanely prolific Irish ensemble the Chieftains released Down the Old Plank Road: The Nashville Sessions. Utilizing American icons like Ricky Skaggs, Del McCoury, and Lyle Lovett alongside the blossoming Gillian Welch and David Rawlings, their interpretations of traditional Irish and Appalachian staples yielded a surprisingly lucid bounty. Not surprisingly, the sessions also yielded another record. Further Down the Old Plank Road: The Nashville Sessions follows the same thread on the neo-traditional loom, pitting the Celtic heroes against such heavyweights as Doc Watson, John Prine, and the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, while incorporating younger artists like Nickel Creek. The Chieftains, possibly the tightest veteran band still performing, have made a career out of effortless creativity and sheer enthusiasm, especially for projects like this one. On the gorgeous "Chief O'Neil's Hornpipe," Paddy Maloney's bittersweet piping effortlessly segues into Chet Atkins' understated picking. It's like listening to a couple of old friends sharing a beer on a Sunday evening. Emmylou Harris croons "Lambs in the Greenfield" that'll leave a lump in your throat, and Tim O'Brien tears through a version of "Shady Grove," fueled by the ancestral flames of its birth. Only the forced soul of Allison Moorer's "Hick's Farewell" and Don Williams' generic rendering of the classic ballad "Wild Mountain Thyme" keep Further Down the Old Plank Road from being a major achievement. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1992 | RCA Victor

A classic for lovers of good and heartfelt music played with joy. This has Paddy Moloney and the Chieftains combining forces with one of the best assemblages of country musicians put together. A diverse group it definitely is, stretching from Ricky Skaggs to Don Williams to Colin James running into Willie Nelson and Chet Atkins and so forth in a cornucopia of audio delight. From the opening joy of "Happy to Meet," tcrossing the musical streets to "Heartbreak Hotel," to the romping joy shown by the players in "Cotton-Eyed Joe" and "Cunla," this CD is a never-ending country grab-bag of musical mastery. The players seem to be a unit that has been been down the long hard road of wire fenced stages in cheap bars together honing its skills, which arrive at fruition here. © Bob Gottlieb /TiVo
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CD30,99 Fr.

Pop/Rock - Erschienen am 21. Februar 2006 | RCA Victor - Legacy

RCA Legacy's The Essential Chieftains breaks the legendary Irish collective's career into two sections. The first disc focuses on 18 of the group's finest traditional works like "Boil the Breakfast Early," "The Wind That Shakes the Barley/The Reel with the Beryle," and "Donegal Set," while the second disc relies on 17 of the band's billion or so collaborations, such as "Mo Ghile Mear" with Sting, "Shenandoah" with Van Morrison, and "Foggy Dew" with Sinéad O'Connor. At this point in their long and storied career -- 40 albums over 40 years -- a truly comprehensive anthology would have required the box set to end all box sets, but this Essential collection is fair enough for purists and accessible enough for casual fans to fill the void until that time comes. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Folk - Erschienen am 23. September 1996 | RCA Victor

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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 28. Januar 1992 | RCA Victor

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CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 6. Mai 1988 | RCA Victor

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CD21,99 Fr.

Aus aller Welt - Erschienen am 22. Februar 2005 | RCA Victor

Harp player/multi-instrumentalist Derek Bell, a member of the Chieftains since 1972, was -- unlike his co-conspirators -- a classically trained musician. His love for the traditional music of Ireland and the world over, as well as his mischievous nature, may have found him bestowing his talents upon an entirely different audience than he originally expected, but as he was fond of saying, "No one ever asked me to join, and no one ever asked me to leave." Recorded in 2004, Live From Dublin: A Tribute to Derek Bell finds the remaining members, as well as numerous special guests including Allison Moorer and Anuna -- the latter do flawless rendition of the tongue-twisting classic "Fionnghuala," made famous by the Bothy Band -- burning through a set of both traditional and contemporary sets that manage to celebrate the group's lauded past while keeping an eye on their immediate future. The performances are all top-notch and the emotions run high, resulting in a powerful -- yet whimsical -- celebration of one of Celtic music's late greats. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Folk - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1993 | RCA Victor

Produced by head Chieftain Paddy Maloney, The Celtic Harp is essentially a showcase for the very talented harpist Derek Bell. Bell handled all of the arrangements, as well as contributed harpsichord and tiompan to the proceedings. Fine solos from flute god Matt Malloy ("Parting of Friends/Kerry Fling"), vocalist Kevin Conneff ("Green Fields of America"), and pipe player Maloney ("T'Aimse 'Im Chodladh") give the album a definite Chieftain feel, but The Celtic Harp belongs to Bell, who infuses each note with the subtlety and grace of a true master. © TiVo