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CD20,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2008 | Lost Highway Records

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Shelby Lynne has followed her own sometimes reckless, always adventuresome muse throughout her career. Just a Little Lovin' is her personal homage to the late, legendary Dusty Springfield. Nine of its ten cuts are inextricably linked to the late British vocalist whose sway Lynne came under years ago, but a chance conversation with Barry Manilow -- of all people -- led to the making of this record. Lynne doesn't attempt to sound like Springfield. She uses her own phrasing and rhythmic sensibility. Four cuts here come from the Dusty in Memphis period, as well as the title track to The Look of Love and some of her mid-'60s British hits that were not released in America. All these songs, with the exception of the self-penned "Pretend," were recorded by Springfield. The album was recorded in the Capitol Records studio with Frank Sinatra's microphone and producer Phil Ramone. Lynne's aesthetic sense serves her well: most singers automatically shoot for "Son of a Preacher Man," but Lynne steers clear. She does, however, tackle some truly monolithic Springfield hits: "Just a Little Lovin'," "Breakfast in Bed," "Willie and Laura Mae Jones," and "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore." Lynne's readings are close, intimate. They're understated but more direct. Ramone used a small quartet in guitarist Dean Parks, keyboardist Rob Mathes, drummer Gregg Field, and bassist Kevin Axt to give her that edge. Lynne's delivery takes these songs straight to the listener's belly. The taut but easy sensuality in her voice adds a very different dimension to them. When she gets to the in-the-pocket feel of "Breakfast in Bed," she comes at the tune's subject with an up-front sexual expression -- Springfield's trademark vulnerability is willfully absent. A Rhodes and Parks' guitar give her plenty of room to pour out the lyric. "Willie and Laura Mae Jones" has a rough, swampy earthiness; Lynne adds her guitar to its sparse, slow growl. Springfield recorded this tome about interracial love when the subject was taboo in America. She made it palatable with her innocent delivery. Lynne gets at Tony Joe White's lyric with a bluesy toughness expressing incredulity toward injustice. Randy Newman's "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore" carries inside it the trace of both Lynne's Southern homeland and her adopted West Coast residency. She can tell this heartbreaking tale as if it were her own while uncannily recalling Springfield's empathy. Signature Springfield pieces such as "I Only Want to Be with You" are astonishing for their contrast. The bubbly, poppy original version is slowed here; it offers the impression of genuine surprise by an unsuspecting protagonist. The jazzy piano and Parks' lush guitar lines entwine perfectly. Springfield's version of "The Look of Love" has remained unchallenged for more than 40 years. Lynne doesn't even try. Instead she offers tribute. It's not as sultry as the original was, but feels honest and hungry in stripping off the lyric's mask with her voice. "How Can I Be Sure" by the Rascals -- cut as a British-only single by Springfield -- is startling: Lynne sings it accompanied only by Parks' guitar. It's a radical but fitting closer. Just a Little Lovin' is the finest tribute Springfield has ever received on tape. That such a fine singer and songwriter interpreted her in such an empathic and sophisticated manner is respect personified. Ramone's care with the project is, as usual, celebratory. The multidimensional persona Lynne usually displays on her records is still here in spades. Her diversity, confidence, and wide-ranging ability are the standard to aspire to. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2008 | Lost Highway Records

Hi-Res
Shelby Lynne has followed her own sometimes reckless, always adventuresome muse throughout her career. Just a Little Lovin' is her personal homage to the late, legendary Dusty Springfield. Nine of its ten cuts are inextricably linked to the late British vocalist whose sway Lynne came under years ago, but a chance conversation with Barry Manilow -- of all people -- led to the making of this record. Lynne doesn't attempt to sound like Springfield. She uses her own phrasing and rhythmic sensibility. Four cuts here come from the Dusty in Memphis period, as well as the title track to The Look of Love and some of her mid-'60s British hits that were not released in America. All these songs, with the exception of the self-penned "Pretend," were recorded by Springfield. The album was recorded in the Capitol Records studio with Frank Sinatra's microphone and producer Phil Ramone. Lynne's aesthetic sense serves her well: most singers automatically shoot for "Son of a Preacher Man," but Lynne steers clear. She does, however, tackle some truly monolithic Springfield hits: "Just a Little Lovin'," "Breakfast in Bed," "Willie and Laura Mae Jones," and "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore." Lynne's readings are close, intimate. They're understated but more direct. Ramone used a small quartet in guitarist Dean Parks, keyboardist Rob Mathes, drummer Gregg Field, and bassist Kevin Axt to give her that edge. Lynne's delivery takes these songs straight to the listener's belly. The taut but easy sensuality in her voice adds a very different dimension to them. When she gets to the in-the-pocket feel of "Breakfast in Bed," she comes at the tune's subject with an up-front sexual expression -- Springfield's trademark vulnerability is willfully absent. A Rhodes and Parks' guitar give her plenty of room to pour out the lyric. "Willie and Laura Mae Jones" has a rough, swampy earthiness; Lynne adds her guitar to its sparse, slow growl. Springfield recorded this tome about interracial love when the subject was taboo in America. She made it palatable with her innocent delivery. Lynne gets at Tony Joe White's lyric with a bluesy toughness expressing incredulity toward injustice. Randy Newman's "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore" carries inside it the trace of both Lynne's Southern homeland and her adopted West Coast residency. She can tell this heartbreaking tale as if it were her own while uncannily recalling Springfield's empathy. Signature Springfield pieces such as "I Only Want to Be with You" are astonishing for their contrast. The bubbly, poppy original version is slowed here; it offers the impression of genuine surprise by an unsuspecting protagonist. The jazzy piano and Parks' lush guitar lines entwine perfectly. Springfield's version of "The Look of Love" has remained unchallenged for more than 40 years. Lynne doesn't even try. Instead she offers tribute. It's not as sultry as the original was, but feels honest and hungry in stripping off the lyric's mask with her voice. "How Can I Be Sure" by the Rascals -- cut as a British-only single by Springfield -- is startling: Lynne sings it accompanied only by Parks' guitar. It's a radical but fitting closer. Just a Little Lovin' is the finest tribute Springfield has ever received on tape. That such a fine singer and songwriter interpreted her in such an empathic and sophisticated manner is respect personified. Ramone's care with the project is, as usual, celebratory. The multidimensional persona Lynne usually displays on her records is still here in spades. Her diversity, confidence, and wide-ranging ability are the standard to aspire to. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 17. April 2020 | Everso Records

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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Folk - Erschienen am 18. August 2017 | Silver Cross Records

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Zwar haben Shelby Lynne und Allison Moorer etwas mehr als zwanzig Einspielungen gemeinsam gemacht und sich bei einigen Konzerten gegenseitig die Arme untergehakt, aber bisher haben die beiden noch nie miteinander ein Album erstellt. Nun ist es so weit und für Not Dark Yet hatten die Schwestern beschlossen, fast zur Gänze Wiederaufnahmen zu präsentieren. Für die zwei großartigen Stimmen mit lauter Country Soul aus unserer Zeit ist dies eine Art, ihren vielseitigen Geschmack ein bisschen mehr zum tragen zu bringen. Eingefleischter Country (Merle Haggard, die Louvin Brothers, Jessi Colter) liegt also gleich neben dem Rock (Nirvana, The Killers, Nick Cave) und neben den großen Songwritern (Bob Dylan, Townes Van Zandt), aber die Platte endet mit einem schönen Song, den die beiden gemeinsam geschrieben haben: Is It Too Much. Man schlängelt sich also mit wahrem Vergnügen durch diese Duos hindurch, die im Sommer 2016 in Los Angeles eingespielt und von Teddy Thompson produziert wurden. Auch wenn diese Wiederaufnahmen die Welt nicht verändern werden, so ist dieses herrliche Werk eine Gelegenheit, sich die stimmliche Leistung dieser beiden Frauen erneut in Erinnerung zu rufen. Shelby Lynne und Allison Moorer haben sich noch dazu auf ein paar, bei Einspielungen recht erfahrene Musiker verlassen, so etwa Doug Pettibone an der Gitarre und Benmont Tench an den Keyboards, und damit ist diese Platte ein echtes Vergnügen. © CM/Qobuz
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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2008 | Lost Highway Records

Shelby Lynne has followed her own sometimes reckless, always adventuresome muse throughout her career. Just a Little Lovin' is her personal homage to the late, legendary Dusty Springfield. Nine of its ten cuts are inextricably linked to the late British vocalist whose sway Lynne came under years ago, but a chance conversation with Barry Manilow -- of all people -- led to the making of this record. Lynne doesn't attempt to sound like Springfield. She uses her own phrasing and rhythmic sensibility. Four cuts here come from the Dusty in Memphis period, as well as the title track to The Look of Love and some of her mid-'60s British hits that were not released in America. All these songs, with the exception of the self-penned "Pretend," were recorded by Springfield. The album was recorded in the Capitol Records studio with Frank Sinatra's microphone and producer Phil Ramone. Lynne's aesthetic sense serves her well: most singers automatically shoot for "Son of a Preacher Man," but Lynne steers clear. She does, however, tackle some truly monolithic Springfield hits: "Just a Little Lovin'," "Breakfast in Bed," "Willie and Laura Mae Jones," and "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore." Lynne's readings are close, intimate. They're understated but more direct. Ramone used a small quartet in guitarist Dean Parks, keyboardist Rob Mathes, drummer Gregg Field, and bassist Kevin Axt to give her that edge. Lynne's delivery takes these songs straight to the listener's belly. The taut but easy sensuality in her voice adds a very different dimension to them. When she gets to the in-the-pocket feel of "Breakfast in Bed," she comes at the tune's subject with an up-front sexual expression -- Springfield's trademark vulnerability is willfully absent. A Rhodes and Parks' guitar give her plenty of room to pour out the lyric. "Willie and Laura Mae Jones" has a rough, swampy earthiness; Lynne adds her guitar to its sparse, slow growl. Springfield recorded this tome about interracial love when the subject was taboo in America. She made it palatable with her innocent delivery. Lynne gets at Tony Joe White's lyric with a bluesy toughness expressing incredulity toward injustice. Randy Newman's "I Don't Want to Hear It Anymore" carries inside it the trace of both Lynne's Southern homeland and her adopted West Coast residency. She can tell this heartbreaking tale as if it were her own while uncannily recalling Springfield's empathy. Signature Springfield pieces such as "I Only Want to Be with You" are astonishing for their contrast. The bubbly, poppy original version is slowed here; it offers the impression of genuine surprise by an unsuspecting protagonist. The jazzy piano and Parks' lush guitar lines entwine perfectly. Springfield's version of "The Look of Love" has remained unchallenged for more than 40 years. Lynne doesn't even try. Instead she offers tribute. It's not as sultry as the original was, but feels honest and hungry in stripping off the lyric's mask with her voice. "How Can I Be Sure" by the Rascals -- cut as a British-only single by Springfield -- is startling: Lynne sings it accompanied only by Parks' guitar. It's a radical but fitting closer. Just a Little Lovin' is the finest tribute Springfield has ever received on tape. That such a fine singer and songwriter interpreted her in such an empathic and sophisticated manner is respect personified. Ramone's care with the project is, as usual, celebratory. The multidimensional persona Lynne usually displays on her records is still here in spades. Her diversity, confidence, and wide-ranging ability are the standard to aspire to. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
Ab
HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 4. Mai 2015 | New Rounder

Hi-Res Booklet
After getting fed up with the music business, Shelby Lynne, always true to herself, walked away and formed her own Everso label in 2010. Apparently, she's had a change of heart. I Can't Imagine appears on the stalwart Rounder label distributed by Concord. Recorded at Dockside Studio in Maurice, Louisiana with a small band and a few select guests, the set's ten tracks run a gamut of styles Lynne's explored in the past, from West Coast singer/songwriter musings and New Orleans- and Stax-inspired R&B to rock and Americana, woven inside her own signature brand of sophisticated adult pop. Self-produced with assistance from her music director Ben Peeler, Lynne wrote or co-wrote everything here. Two fine songs, "Love Is Strong" and "Be in the Now," were co-written with Ron Sexsmith. The former is a ballad that weds Owen Bradley-esque Patsy Cline countrypolitan to post-psych pop. The latter features rootsy flatpicking and slide guitars offset by a drum break and a funky electric piano line worthy of Allen Toussaint. The hardest rocking cut, "Down Here," a militant anthem to tolerance, recalls Neil Young's "Southern Man" in places. It would be right at home on contemporary country radio -- if the song's pro-gay stance didn't contradict the format's radically conservative views. The easy retro soul groove on "Sold the Devil (Sunshine)" co-written with Peeler, reveals just how easy it is for Lynne to deliver maximum feeling in a song. She doesn't sing the lyrics -- she is them. "Following You" delivers a sparse, spooky intro that transforms into a lovely, minor-key romantic ballad played by a trio of Lynne on acoustic guitar and piano, Peeler on guitar and pedal steel, and Leni Stern guesting on n'goni. She's at her very best, however, on the album's bookends. Opener "Paper Van Gogh" is breezy, yet utterly convincing West Coast singer/songwriter pop. The closing title track (one of two co-written with Pete Donnelly), is classic country, complete with whining pedal steel, balanced electric and acoustic guitars, brushed snares, and a hip bridge. Her protagonist expresses profound and unswerving empathy for a loved one shaken by hard times. I Can't Imagine is confident, assured, and fiercely independent. What ties its various threads together is the songwriter's unguarded heart, expressed by her near iconic vocal prowess, and we've come to expect nothing less from Lynne. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD20,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2005 | Capitol Records

Ab
CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 4. Mai 2015 | New Rounder

After getting fed up with the music business, Shelby Lynne, always true to herself, walked away and formed her own Everso label in 2010. Apparently, she's had a change of heart. I Can't Imagine appears on the stalwart Rounder label distributed by Concord. Recorded at Dockside Studio in Maurice, Louisiana with a small band and a few select guests, the set's ten tracks run a gamut of styles Lynne's explored in the past, from West Coast singer/songwriter musings and New Orleans- and Stax-inspired R&B to rock and Americana, woven inside her own signature brand of sophisticated adult pop. Self-produced with assistance from her music director Ben Peeler, Lynne wrote or co-wrote everything here. Two fine songs, "Love Is Strong" and "Be in the Now," were co-written with Ron Sexsmith. The former is a ballad that weds Owen Bradley-esque Patsy Cline countrypolitan to post-psych pop. The latter features rootsy flatpicking and slide guitars offset by a drum break and a funky electric piano line worthy of Allen Toussaint. The hardest rocking cut, "Down Here," a militant anthem to tolerance, recalls Neil Young's "Southern Man" in places. It would be right at home on contemporary country radio -- if the song's pro-gay stance didn't contradict the format's radically conservative views. The easy retro soul groove on "Sold the Devil (Sunshine)" co-written with Peeler, reveals just how easy it is for Lynne to deliver maximum feeling in a song. She doesn't sing the lyrics -- she is them. "Following You" delivers a sparse, spooky intro that transforms into a lovely, minor-key romantic ballad played by a trio of Lynne on acoustic guitar and piano, Peeler on guitar and pedal steel, and Leni Stern guesting on n'goni. She's at her very best, however, on the album's bookends. Opener "Paper Van Gogh" is breezy, yet utterly convincing West Coast singer/songwriter pop. The closing title track (one of two co-written with Pete Donnelly), is classic country, complete with whining pedal steel, balanced electric and acoustic guitars, brushed snares, and a hip bridge. Her protagonist expresses profound and unswerving empathy for a loved one shaken by hard times. I Can't Imagine is confident, assured, and fiercely independent. What ties its various threads together is the songwriter's unguarded heart, expressed by her near iconic vocal prowess, and we've come to expect nothing less from Lynne. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
Ab
CD8,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 26. September 2010 | Everso Records

Ab
CD20,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2003 | Capitol Records

Ab
CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 25. Januar 2000 | New Rounder

Booklet
After years of kicking around Nashville to great acclaim but nonexistent sales, Shelby Lynne got fed up with the system and reinvented herself on I Am Shelby Lynne as a tough and sexy singer, equal parts Bonnie Raitt and Sheryl Crow. Though this album is undeniably classicist in approach, borrowing from classic R&B, country, soul, and rock & roll, it's cleverly constructed, as producer Bill Bottrell gives it a wonderful, warm production graced by slight contemporary flourishes (such as the rolling rhythms behind "Thought It Would Be Easier") that keep it fresh, not entrenched in history (even though its succinct ten tracks and half-hour running time are welcome holdovers from classic rock). Ultimately, of course, the triumph of the record belongs to Lynne, who finally sounds comfortable in her writing and voice. This music is so warm and welcoming, it's easy to overlook the darker themes running through the songs, particularly because Lynne's greatest strength is that she never oversings, shading her phrasing and drawing listeners in with her easy confidence and sexy rasp. This isn't an album that flaunts its strengths -- it's expertly constructed, subtle music that grows in stature with each spin, revealing Lynne as a trad rocker of uncommon skill and charm. It may have taken her years to finally find her groove, but I Am Shelby Lynne is so good, the wait seems worthwhile. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD8,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 17. Oktober 2011 | Everso Records

Ab
CD20,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2007 | Lost Highway Records

Ab
CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 10. September 2000 | Lucky Dog

Ab
CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2001 | New Rounder

Ab
CD8,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 14. November 2010 | Everso Records

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CD8,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 18. November 2012 | Everso Records

Ab
CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. März 1989 | Columbia Nashville Legacy

Ab
CD11,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 4. Mai 2004 | Curb Records

Ab
CD4,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 17. November 2013 | Everso Records