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HI-RES37,99 Fr.
CD27,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 20. Januar 2014 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Auszeichnungen 4F de Télérama - Indispensable JAZZ NEWS - Hi-Res Audio
Nearly eight years after Rosanne Cash last released a set of original songs, 2014's The River & the Thread finds her in a reflective mood, and just as 2009's The List saw her looking back with a set of classic songs recommended by her father, the late country legend Johnny Cash, The River & the Thread is dominated by thoughts and emotions that occurred to her as she was involved in a project to restore Johnny's boyhood home. This doesn't mean that Cash has returned to the spunky, country-accented sound of her most popular work -- this is still Rosanne Cash the mature and thoughtful singer/songwriter we've come to know since the late '90s, and the tone of this album is unfailingly literate. But though this music isn't country, it's certainly Southern, and road trips from Alabama to Tennessee, visits to the Tallahatchie Bridge and Money Street, and vintage gospel music on the radio embroider these songs as Cash immerses herself in the places that were once close to home as if she's reuniting with long lost family. And two of the songs cut especially close to home -- "Etta's Tune" was written in memory of Marshall Grant, a longtime family friend and member of Johnny Cash's band, while "When the Master Calls the Roll" is a tale of love torn apart during the Civil War that Cash wrote in collaboration with her former husband Rodney Crowell and current spouse John Leventhal -- and they rank with the best material on the album, genuine and heartfelt, and written and performed with a genuine passion that never sinks into sentimental histrionics. Just as Cash's songs are crafted with a subtle intelligence, her vocals here are superb, getting to the heart of the lyrics without painting herself into a corner, and the production is rich but elegant and to the point. Rosanne Cash hasn't been especially prolific in the 21st century, and at under 40 minutes, she wasn't crafting an epic with The River & the Thread. But she's learned to make every word and every note count, and this album confirms once again that she's matured into a singular artist with the talent and the vision to make these stories of her travels in the South come to vivid and affecting life. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD11,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2009 | Manhattan Records

Auszeichnungen 3F de Télérama
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CD17,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Auszeichnungen 4F de Télérama
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CD27,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 20. Januar 2014 | Blue Note (BLU)

Auszeichnungen 4F de Télérama
Nearly eight years after Rosanne Cash last released a set of original songs, 2014's The River & the Thread finds her in a reflective mood, and just as 2009's The List saw her looking back with a set of classic songs recommended by her father, the late country legend Johnny Cash, The River & the Thread is dominated by thoughts and emotions that occurred to her as she was involved in a project to restore Johnny's boyhood home. This doesn't mean that Cash has returned to the spunky, country-accented sound of her most popular work -- this is still Rosanne Cash the mature and thoughtful singer/songwriter we've come to know since the late '90s, and the tone of this album is unfailingly literate. But though this music isn't country, it's certainly Southern, and road trips from Alabama to Tennessee, visits to the Tallahatchie Bridge and Money Street, and vintage gospel music on the radio embroider these songs as Cash immerses herself in the places that were once close to home as if she's reuniting with long lost family. And two of the songs cut especially close to home -- "Etta's Tune" was written in memory of Marshall Grant, a longtime family friend and member of Johnny Cash's band, while "When the Master Calls the Roll" is a tale of love torn apart during the Civil War that Cash wrote in collaboration with her former husband Rodney Crowell and current spouse John Leventhal -- and they rank with the best material on the album, genuine and heartfelt, and written and performed with a genuine passion that never sinks into sentimental histrionics. Just as Cash's songs are crafted with a subtle intelligence, her vocals here are superb, getting to the heart of the lyrics without painting herself into a corner, and the production is rich but elegant and to the point. Rosanne Cash hasn't been especially prolific in the 21st century, and at under 40 minutes, she wasn't crafting an epic with The River & the Thread. But she's learned to make every word and every note count, and this album confirms once again that she's matured into a singular artist with the talent and the vision to make these stories of her travels in the South come to vivid and affecting life. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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HI-RES32,49 Fr.
CD23,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 2. November 2018 | Blue Note Records

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CD19,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1996 | Capitol Records

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HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 2. November 2018 | Blue Note Records

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CD19,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2006 | Capitol Records

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HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1987 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rosanne Cash's catalog on Columbia is nothing if not formidable. Her pioneering meld of country, rock & roll (with an emphasis on "rock"), folk, and even blues, her topical concerns (which went deeper than most songwriters who came before her in taking on the tough topics of life), and her insistence on working outside the Nashville box scored her a number of hits and blazed the trail for many women who came later. King's Record Shop followed by two years her flirtation with the kind of pop coming out of England in droves, the radically underappreciated Rhythm & Romance. King's Record Shop -- produced by her then-husband and longtime collaborator Rodney Crowell -- is a granite-solid collection of covers and originals that delve deeply into the traditions that informed her life and created her as an artist, while revealing the trouble in her marriage to Crowell. The opening track, Eliza Gilkyson's "Rosie Strike Back," is a real feminist country anthem, and contains killer backing vocals from Patty Smyth (of Scandal) and Steve Winwood. Her read of John Hiatt's "The Way We Make a Broken Heart" is the kind of torch and tang ballad that will stand the test of time simply for its gender-bending take on relationships. Her collaboration with Hank DeVito, "If You Change Your Mind," is a jangly folk-rock ballad that expresses romantic longing in the face of a wayward lover; in its choruses one hears need as well as generosity. "The Real Me," a song that offers the vulnerability, truth, and flaws of a life in the process of transformation, is a preview of the type of material that would appear on the nakedly revealing Interiors. And it just goes deeper, from her rollicking and rebellious rocker "Somewhere Sometime" to the stellar cover of John Stewart's heart-wrenching "Runaway Train" to the straight-ahead country of her father Johnny's "Tennessee Flat Top Box." With its faux soul R&B chorus, Crowell's "I Don't Have to Crawl" is as full of want, cracked-heart honesty, and determination to keep standing as anything in country music. Ultimately, King's Record Shop is Rosanne Cash's classic, a work that transcends production and songwriting styles and the pop and country music of the time. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2003 | Capitol Records

Da schlägt das Herz fast schneller: Auf ihrer ersten Studioplatte seit sieben Jahren singt Rosanne Cash zum ersten Mal im Duett mit ihrem Übervater Johnny. Das Ergebnis trägt den Titel "September When It Comes", ist von einer gezupften Gitarre getragen und erinnert vom Stil her an die von Rick Rubin produzierte American Recordings-Serie. "Ich kann keine Berge mehr bewegen, ich kann nicht mehr rennen, ich kann nicht mehr sein, wie ich früher war. Irgendwie war ich es eh nie", dichtet Frau Cash ihrem Vater biografisch auf den Leib. Ein Höhepunkt auf diesem Album, aber bei weitem nicht der Einzige. In den 80er Jahren hat sich Rosanne Cash vor allem in den USA als anspruchsvolle Singer/Songwriterin etabliert. Vom früheren Country-Schwerpunkt ist dabei wenig übrig geblieben. Von Cashs Ehemann John Leventhal produziert, ist "Rules Of Travel" Popmusik der anspruchsvollen Art. "Willst du ehrlich sein oder willst du gewinnen? Du könntest beides haben, wenn du nur elegant beigeben würdest", trägt sie auf dem Opener "Beautiful Pain" vor, dezent unterstützt von Sheryl Crow. Rosanne, mittlerweile fast 50, hat in ihrem Leben einige Erfahrungen gesammelt und trägt ihre Erkenntnisse unaufdringlich vor. Der Titelsong bezieht sich auf die innere Reise, die eine Beziehung darstellt. Es gibt Rückschläge und schwierige Momente, aber keinen "Reiseführer", denn die Vorschriften befinden sich im Herzen des jeweils anderen, trägt sie mit angenehm hoher und fester Stimme vor. Von der ganzen Reihe eingeladener prominenter Beiträge sind am Ende zugunsten eigenem Material nur wenige übrig geblieben. Steve Earl singt bei "I'll Change For You" mit, das zarte "Hope Against Hope" stammt dagegen aus der Feder Jakob Dylans. Musikalisch hört sich das an wie eine Mischung aus George Harrison und einem Tom Petty der ruhigeren Art. Das Album fließt schön vor sich hin, genaueres Hinhören offenbart gut überlegte Arrangements hinter einer nur scheinbar einfachen Klangfassade. Vergleiche zwischen Vater und Tochter sind fast unvermeidbar, in diesem Fall aber nicht hilfreich. Ohne Rubins Unterstützung wäre der Erzeuger längst eine Fußnote der Musikgeschichte. Rosanne Cash bleibt dagegen ein wenig auffälliger, aber unabhängiger und leuchtender Stern am Pophimmel. © Laut
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CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. November 2005 | Columbia - Legacy

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HI-RES3,99 Fr.
CD2,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. April 2021 | Blue Note Records

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CD30,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 24. Juni 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

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CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1990 | Columbia - Legacy

On Rosanne Cash's final recording for Columbia's Nashville division she pulled out all the stops. Already known for her unflinching honesty, she took it to its most poignant and searing extreme on Interiors. Cash produced the record herself and wrote or co-wrote all the material here. A country record it's not, but that hardly matters. This is a pop record with teeth and ache and broken hearts strewn all over the place. In fact, Interiors has the feel of a battlefield emptied of everything but its ghosts. The album is a collection of ten songs linked thematically by the chronicling of the tension, dysfunction, and ultimate dissolution of Cash's marriage to Rodney Crowell caused by dishonesty, infidelity, substance abuse, and physical distance; and she owns her side of the street with courage without laying blame. Carefully wrought with subtle instrumentation surrounding her fearless yet wavering vocals. Acoustic guitars, pianos, brushed drums, an occasional organ, a bass almost hidden under layers of ethereal grace -- these are the musical trappings that frame Cash's voice as she sets about a task so seemingly painful it's almost uncomfortable to listen to. It's as if the listener is granted a private audience with her heart and innermost thoughts. Everything is here: the disillusionment, the anger, the vain hope of reconciliation, and finally the acceptance and resignation that endings are a part of life and serve their purpose. While these ten tracks are virtually inseparable from one another, there are standouts such as "Dance With the Tiger" written with John Stewart, "Real Woman" written with Crowell, "Mirror Image," "I Want a Cure," and the harrowing closer, "Paralyzed," where Cash is accompanied only by a piano. Here she lets her current position be known, that seeing the end of this relationship leaves her in the clutches of being unable to move from the emotional space she is in. This album is full of a truth that most would rather not acknowledge, but it is morally and spiritually instructive in terms of its lyrical content, and musically it is her masterpiece. In fact, it's proof that art can redeem what cannot be in human terms. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 7. November 1995 | Columbia

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CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 9. März 1993 | Columbia

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CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 17. Februar 1998 | Columbia Nashville

Included are ten of Rosanne Cash's biggest hits, from "Seven Year Ache," "The Way We Make a Broken Heart," and "Blue Moon with Heartache" to "Never Be You." Though there would've been plenty of room for additional hits, this disc isn't bad value-for-money at a cheap price. © John Bush /TiVo
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HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1979 | Columbia Nashville Legacy

Hi-Res Booklet
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CD21,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1989 | Columbia Nashville

Rosanne Cash recorded many worthwhile albums in the years after Hits 1979-1989 was released, but this compilation covers the time when Cash was a country star and reliable hitmaker -- namely, the '80s. At only 12 tracks, the collection doesn't feature all of her hits, but it does contain what are arguably the cream of the crop -- "No Memories Hangin' Around," "Seven Year Ache," "My Baby Thinks He's a Train," "Blue Moon with Heartache," "I Wonder," "I Don' t Know Why You Don't Want Me," "Never Be You," "Hold On," "The Way We Make a Broken Heart," "Tennessee Flat Top Box" and "I Don't Want to Spoil the Party." With a catalog as rich as Cash's, a compilation this brief can only skim the surface, but the end result is a terrifically engaging listen for the devoted and the curious alike. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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HI-RES3,99 Fr.
CD2,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 20. Oktober 2020 | Blue Note Records

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