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CD14,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1998 | Island Mercury

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung
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CD27,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2006 | Island Def Jam

Auszeichnungen Qobuz' Schallplattensammlung
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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 24. April 2020 | Highway 20 Records

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2017 nahm sich Lucinda Williams die Freiheit, einen Schritt zurück in die Vergangenheit zu machen, um eine komplette Neuinterpretation ihres legendären Albums aus dem Jahre 1992, Sweet Old World, vorzulegen, das sie bei dieser Gelegenheit dann in This Sweet Old World umbenannte. Jetzt, drei Jahre später, legt die Königin des Americana neue Texte vor, nun aber auf einer 100%ig neuen Platte. Auf den zuletzt veröffentlichten Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone (2014) und The Ghosts of Highway 20 (2016) jonglierte Lucinda mit Arrangements, Gesang, Songstrukturen und sogar mit einer introspektiven Variante ihrer Texte. Auf Good Souls Better Angels stellt sie ihr erzählerisches Talent jedoch etwas in den Schatten, um die derzeitigen Ungerechtigkeiten und Gehässigkeiten anzufechten. Häusliche Gewalt (Wakin’ Up), unheilvolle Nachrichten in den Medien (Bad News Blues), Niederträchtigkeit in den Social Media (Shadows & Doubts), der Fall Donald Trump (Man Without a Soul), nichts entgeht ihr! Dieser alles andere als lähmende Aktionismus wird von ihrer langjährigen Band (Schlagzeuger Butch Norton, Gitarrist Stuart Mathis und Bassist David Sutton) mit einem Soundtrack voller schnörkellosem Rock’n’Roll unterstützt. Eine ungeschminkte und ungeschliffene Musik, die wie in einem Film zwischen energiegeladenen Titeln und Balladen hin und her wechselt.Dieses ergreifende Good Souls Better Angels verdankt sein Dasein eher dem Blues als dem Country. „Der Teufel hat sich ziemlich oft durch dieses Album geschlichen. Ich mochte immer schon die Bilder, die Robert Johnson in seinen Songs beschreibt und diesen so düsteren Delta-Blues, der mehr oder weniger biblischen Charakter hat. Ich habe mich von Leonard Cohen inspirieren lassen, weil er in seinen Stücken davon erzählt, aber auch von Bob Dylan et Nick Cave.“ Bei dieser Weltuntergangsstimmung mit Bezug auf das Alte Testament nutzt Lucinda Williams ihre Songs (die sie großteils, und das ist eine Premiere, zusammen mit Tom Overby, ihrem Manager und Ehemann geschrieben hat!) als Pilgerstäbe und pazifistische Waffen. Und wenn sie dann ihre Messe ausklingen lässt mit den Zeilen: „(...) Ich möchte bei all den Leuten bleiben, die mir helfen, Kraft zu finden, wenn ich verzweifelt bin, die mich leiten und mir helfen, stark und mutig zu bleiben“, dann kann man einfach nicht mehr von ihrer Seite weichen. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz 
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CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2003 | Lost Highway Records

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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 29. September 2017 | Highway 20 Records

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Im Jahre 1992 nahm Lucinda Williams mit vierzig Jahren ein bedeutendes viertes Album auf: Sweet Old World. Ein einwandfreies Werk des Country Rock gemischt mit Blues, das ihr den Status der Königin des Americana verlieh, welchen sie 1998 mit dem Meisterwerk Car Wheels on a Gravel Road noch einmal aufs Neue verteidigte… 25 Jahre später hat die Songwriterin aus Louisiana die amüsante Idee, das Album Sweet Old World, hierfür in This Sweet Old World umbenannt, noch einmal komplett neu aufzunehmen. In der Begleitung des Gitarristen Stuart Mathis, des Bassisten David Sutton, des Schlagzeugers Butch Norton und des großartigen Greg Leisz an der Steel-Gitarre (der übrigens auch auf dem Album von 1992 anwesend war), lässt uns Lucinda Williams noch einmal aufs neue ihre Songs bewundern, nun natürlich mit einem etwas moderneren Sound. Hier und da werden einige Lyrics verändert, die Trackliste umgewälzt und dem Album ein paar neue, bislang unveröffentlichte Songs hinzugefügt. © MZ/Qobuz
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CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2007 | Lost Highway Records

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CD11,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 14. Januar 2014 | Lucinda Williams Music

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CD20,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2001 | Lost Highway

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CD15,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 21. August 1992 | Chrysalis Records

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CD27,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 10. Mai 2005 | Lost Highway

Lucinda Williams has earned a reputation for her meticulous approach to making albums, but a careful listen to her work suggests that she isn't trying to make her music sound perfect, she just wants it to sound right, and she isn't afraid to spend the extra time waiting for the charmed moment to get caught on tape. This attitude seems to be borne out in her first-ever concert album, Live @ The Fillmore, which manages to sound carefully considered, and a model of "warts and all" authenticity at the same time. Recorded during a three-night stand in San Francisco, the album captures Williams' band in superb form -- Doug Pettibone's guitars, Taras Prodaniuk's bass, and Jim Christie's drums merge into a tight and emphatic groove machine that can match Williams's many moods, whether she's quietly contemplative on "Blue," rocking out hard on "Changed the Locks," or howling the blues on "Essence," while the deeply resonant recording and mix gives them the royal treatment. Williams herself is a slightly more complicated matter here -- her performance is deeply into the spirit, so much so that sometimes her melismatic wanderings and broad phrasing sound like they're verging on caricature. But this is clearly a recording of a performance, and by the time we get to the end of disc two, the broad strokes have coalesced into something quite remarkable; as Williams searches through the nooks and crannies of her songs, you sense she's discovering things that she didn't expect to find, and it's a tremendous thing to hear. Lucinda Williams is an artist who writes from her soul, and she's thoroughly unafraid of letting her passion show when she sings. If that makes for strained technique, it also results in very real art, and this album offers a privileged glimpse of a singular songwriter in full flight. © Mark Deming /TiVo
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CD20,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2011 | Lost Highway Records

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CD10,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 30. September 2014 | Highway 20 Records

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CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2016 | Highway 20 Records

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CD12,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Juni 1990 | Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Booklet
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CD17,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 14. Oktober 2008 | Lost Highway

Lucinda Williams has made a career of writing terrific unrequited love songs, shattered ballads, and sexually liberated tomes drenched in blues, country, folk and rock. Since her breakthrough on 1998's Car Wheels on a Gravel Road, she's actually recorded quite regularly; Little Honey is her fourth studio album this decade so far and fifth overall -- in the '90s she released a total of two. Williams throws some more change-ups into the mix this time. For starters, this is the most polished and studied record she's ever made. Produced by Eric Liljestrand and Tom Overby, its sound is utterly contemporary, though its forms are rooted in electric '70s rock as well as her fallbacks on blues and old-school Americana. The set opens with the rollicking "Real Love," with jangling, charging guitars by Doug Pettibone, and Rob Burger on Wurlitzer, and a backing chorus held down by the Bangles' Susanna Hoffs and Matthew Sweet. Its pop/rock bent is tempered by the roiling pace and Williams trademark Louisiana voice. But it's a startling introduction to an album that, while produced with a certain conscious flair, is the most loosely focused of her career in terms of her songwriting. Williams can still write the beautiful cut-time country tunes, such as the ballad "Circles and X's" and the honky tonk "Jailhouse Tears," a fun throwaway duet with Elvis Costello, and a backing chorus that includes Jim Lauderdale. The blues make their appearance on the beautiful "Tears of Joy" and the appropriately titled "Heaven Blues," a song that references her late mother and redemption, with excellent slide work by Pettibone. Greasy, punched up guitar rock is what fuels the sexually charged "Honey Bee," and a cover of AC/DC's "Long Way to the Top" (though her arrangement on the latter doesn't work). There's also the beautiful, but lyrically indulgent, "Little Rock Star" a warning to the unnamed talents who live in the self-made hell of excess. Williams should know. The album's longest cut is "Rarity," a poignantly gorgeous, heartfelt, cough-syrup tribute to an unnamed but very talented peer. It features Hoffs and Sweet, and a lovely gospel horn arrangement by Bruce Fowler. Its languid, lazy pace is atmospheric and draws itself out over eight minutes making for one of the most memorable moments here. Quoting Williams' lyrics out of context doesn't serve for this record, because they are more directly song lyrics than the poetry she's crafted in song form before. Upon first listen Little Honey is quite jarring for all of its textural and production shifts and dodges, but in time it settles into the listener as a mixed collection of decent songs that pack some punch, but no jaw-dropping wallops. The faithful will no doubt enjoy this set, but the novice should look to earlier albums to discover what all the critical fuss has been about these last 25 years. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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CD27,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 10. Mai 2005 | Lost Highway Records

Lucinda Williams has earned a reputation for her meticulous approach to making albums, but a careful listen to her work suggests that she isn't trying to make her music sound perfect, she just wants it to sound right, and she isn't afraid to spend the extra time waiting for the charmed moment to get caught on tape. This attitude seems to be borne out in her first-ever concert album, Live @ The Fillmore, which manages to sound carefully considered, and a model of "warts and all" authenticity at the same time. Recorded during a three-night stand in San Francisco, the album captures Williams' band in superb form -- Doug Pettibone's guitars, Taras Prodaniuk's bass, and Jim Christie's drums merge into a tight and emphatic groove machine that can match Williams's many moods, whether she's quietly contemplative on "Blue," rocking out hard on "Changed the Locks," or howling the blues on "Essence," while the deeply resonant recording and mix gives them the royal treatment. Williams herself is a slightly more complicated matter here -- her performance is deeply into the spirit, so much so that sometimes her melismatic wanderings and broad phrasing sound like they're verging on caricature. But this is clearly a recording of a performance, and by the time we get to the end of disc two, the broad strokes have coalesced into something quite remarkable; as Williams searches through the nooks and crannies of her songs, you sense she's discovering things that she didn't expect to find, and it's a tremendous thing to hear. Lucinda Williams is an artist who writes from her soul, and she's thoroughly unafraid of letting her passion show when she sings. If that makes for strained technique, it also results in very real art, and this album offers a privileged glimpse of a singular songwriter in full flight. © Mark Deming /TiVo
Ab
CD27,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2011 | Lost Highway Records

Ab
CD12,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. August 1991 | Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

Booklet
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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 20. November 2020 | Highway 20 Records

Hi-Res
Ab
CD6,49 Fr.

Country - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2005 | Lost Highway Records