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CD25,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 17. Juni 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Auszeichnungen 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
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HI-RES26,49 Fr.
CD22,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 24. Juli 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

Hi-Res
Ab
CD15,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 28. September 2018 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Ab
CD18,49 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 24. Juli 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

Ab
CD19,19 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 18. Juli 2000 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Though start-up label Hidden Beach and its manufacturer/distributor Sony may have been hoping for another Lauryn Hill in this eloquent young African-American from a Middle Atlantic state, Jill Scott turns out to be something of a hip-hop Patti Smith, a street poet who, on her first album, hasn't quite made the transition from spoken word performances to music, despite an excellent singing voice. With any luck, she will retain her sense of the power of words, since the best parts of this album are the ones when she lets fly, drunk on her verbal virtuosity. Producer Jeff Townes (of DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince fame) and his team of associates from the A Touch of Jazz production company set up sympathetic musical backgrounds for Scott that support her without requiring her to fit her spoken and sung excursions into strict meter. That gives her range to pursue her interests, which include a strong sense of her north Philadelphia neighborhood and such idiosyncratic concerns as food, with many meals listed in detail. But the album has a story to tell, and for the most part it is a love story. Scott describes a relationship from many different angles, including an encounter with her boyfriend's ex in a super market ("Exclusively") and her warnings to that girl (or some other) to stay away ("Gettin' in the Way"). She also breaks painfully from an old boyfriend in favor of the new one ("I Think It's Better"), but mostly she celebrates the relationship ("A Long Walk," "He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat)," "It's Love," "The Way"). But with "Honey Molasses," things turn sour, and on "Love Rain" and "Slowly Surely," she frees herself, concluding that "One Is the Magic #" and toward the end of the album moving on to social concerns with "Watching Me" and "Brotha." This narrative structure gives Scott ample room to express a variety of emotions and to display her "verbal elation." Like many poets, she sometimes delights in a torrent of words for their own sake, but it's hard to fault her when the result is such a fully articulated world view. There is no existing slot in R&B/hip-hop into which this album fits, which only means a new one will have to be created. (The CD marks a new complexity in the use of bonus and hidden tracks. After the 17th track, "Show Me," there are 26 four-second blank tracks, followed by a 44th track, the bonus song, "Try." One minute after this song ends, there is a hidden selection, an alternate version of "Love Rain" that features Mos Def.) © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
Ab
CD15,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 31. August 2004 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Jill Scott gilt als Vertreterin der Neo Soul-Szene. Doch hat sie schon mit ihrem Debüt "Who Is Jill Scott?" gezeigt, dass man sie eigentlich von einengenden Kategorisierung lossagen muss. Das Nachfolgealbum macht nun auf wunderbare Weise deutlich, dass sich Jill Scott in keinen gewöhnlichen Konventionen wohlfühlt. "Beautifully Human" präsentiert sich nämlich eben gar nicht so wunderschön menschlich und dementsprechend gewöhnlich, wie der Titel verheißen mag. Die Platte brilliert mit Seele, Herz, Emotionen und Poesie in so einer überzeugenden Art, dass es eine wahre Freude ist. Letztendlich sollten Namen wie James Poyser (Souquarians-Mastermind), Raphael Saadiq (Ex-Lucy Pearl) und Jazzy Jeff, der wahre Prinz von Bel Air, jedwede Kaufzweifel beiseite fegen. Wer trotzdem skeptisch bleibt, kann sich getrost von der Wärme, dem Talent und der Gelassenheit von Jill Scott überzeugen lassen. Die Soul-Lady entzückt nämlich nicht nur auf den althergebrachten Neo-Soul Stücken, die genussvoll leicht über den Äther laufen, vielmehr sind gerade die aus dem Rahmen fallenden Tracks die eigentlichen Highlights der Platte. "Bedda At Home" huldigt den Wurzeln der musikalischen Vorgänger auf einem treibenden Beat. "I'm Not Afraid" ist gesungene Poesie, die sphärisch fast in Gefilde einer Björk eindringt. Und "Talk To Me" entführt uns Hörer nach Las Vegas, um dort einer Big Band mit ihrer wunderbaren Sängerin zu lauschen und die Zeit um uns herum zu vergessen. Dieses Album ist nicht nur die logische Weiterentwicklung der Jill Scott, die sich auf ihrem Vorgänger so bezaubernd vorgestellt hat. Mit "Beautifully Human" behauptet sich die Dame als wahre Soul-Größe. Egal ob diese Platte als Hintergrund-Musik beim schicken Italiener läuft, als Inspiration für Künstler jeder Art agiert oder als musikalisch-poetisches Werk eingehend rezipiert wird, die Scheibe öffnet nicht nur die Herzen, sondern verzaubert auch. © Laut
Ab
CD16,29 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 25. September 2007 | Ministry Of Sound

The photos on the cover and within the booklet of The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3 do not match the music. Does Jill Scott really have to hail a cab? Is she really awakened in the middle of the night by the need to write songs with an anguished look on her face? Really? Because these songs sound like they were written as she was fed chocolate-dipped strawberries while sprawled out on a bed cloaked with rose petals. Well, that's not entirely true -- there are some exceptions, like the furious "Hate on Me," and a couple songs involving deep heartache and sharp admonishments. For the most part (and considerably more so than Scott's first two studio albums), however, The Real Thing is for romancing couples. While some of the collaborators -- Andre Harris, Vidal Davis, Adam Blackstone -- are all over the singer's past releases, there's a handful of relatively new and significant associates, most notably JR Hutson. (Presumably the son of '70s soul great Leroy Hutson, he is listed as "L. Hutson, Jr." in the songwriting credits.) Hutson and Scott co-wrote four of the album's sweetest and steamiest songs, most of which have a few things in common with mid-'70s albums involving any combination of Minnie Riperton, Leon Ware, and Marvin Gaye. 4hero's "Les Fleurs" cover aside, "Come See Me" is the closest anyone has come to channeling Minnie, updating the slowest, most sensual sides of Perfect Angel and Adventures in Paradise. On the other hand, "Crown Royal" maintains that gooey, slightly sleazed-out sound of Marvin's I Want You while dispensing with the double entendres of that touchstone; Scott gets as erotic as ever, even raunchy at points, while making it all sound like poetry instead of straight smut. It's almost like she heard Janet Jackson's Damita Jo and figured, "Yeah, that's nice, but I can do it about ten times better." © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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CD76,79 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 20. November 2001 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

What you think of Jill Scott's second album, Experience: Jill Scott 826+, is going to depend on how you define the two-hour, double-disc set. Is it, as its title suggests, a live album (recorded mostly on August 26, 2001, in Washington, D.C., hence the "826") plus a bonus disc containing some new studio tracks? Or is it a new studio album with a live disc tacked on? There aren't many artists who can justify the release of a live album after releasing only one studio album, especially when the live album consists almost entirely of material from that one album. The draw here, however, is Scott herself. A performing poet-turned-singer, she clearly knows how to please an audience, and the Washingtonians seem primed, frequently singing along to her songs without prompting and cheering many aspects of the show that can't be appreciated on a mere audio recording of it. If Scott's debut disc found her still in transition from the spoken word to the sung song, she has long since made that shift, and the album is full of vocal pyrotechnics, though, as she herself acknowledges, she talks a lot, even coming off like a standup comic in her defense of her song "Gettin' in the Way." The conceptual unity that tied these songs together on Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 is missing here, but there's no denying Scott's effectiveness as a performer. The "+" disc, however, sounds like a collection of demos for her next album rather than a stand-alone document, even before the extended hidden tracks at the end present alternate versions. (Don't believe the one-minute-and-48-second time listed for the last track; it really runs over 16 minutes.) So, let's call this a satisfying live album with some bonus tracks, a good seasonal stocking-stuffer. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
Ab
CD19,19 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 25. September 2007 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

The photos on the cover and within the booklet of The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3 do not match the music. Does Jill Scott really have to hail a cab? Is she really awakened in the middle of the night by the need to write songs with an anguished look on her face? Really? Because these songs sound like they were written as she was fed chocolate-dipped strawberries while sprawled out on a bed cloaked with rose petals. Well, that's not entirely true -- there are some exceptions, like the furious "Hate on Me," and a couple songs involving deep heartache and sharp admonishments. For the most part (and considerably more so than Scott's first two studio albums), however, The Real Thing is for romancing couples. While some of the collaborators -- Andre Harris, Vidal Davis, Adam Blackstone -- are all over the singer's past releases, there's a handful of relatively new and significant associates, most notably JR Hutson. (Presumably the son of '70s soul great Leroy Hutson, he is listed as "L. Hutson, Jr." in the songwriting credits.) Hutson and Scott co-wrote four of the album's sweetest and steamiest songs, most of which have a few things in common with mid-'70s albums involving any combination of Minnie Riperton, Leon Ware, and Marvin Gaye. 4hero's "Les Fleurs" cover aside, "Come See Me" is the closest anyone has come to channeling Minnie, updating the slowest, most sensual sides of Perfect Angel and Adventures in Paradise. On the other hand, "Crown Royal" maintains that gooey, slightly sleazed-out sound of Marvin's I Want You while dispensing with the double entendres of that touchstone; Scott gets as erotic as ever, even raunchy at points, while making it all sound like poetry instead of straight smut. It's almost like she heard Janet Jackson's Damita Jo and figured, "Yeah, that's nice, but I can do it about ten times better." © Andy Kellman /TiVo

R&B - Erschienen am 16. Juni 2015 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Download nicht verfügbar
Ab
CD11,99 Fr.

House - Erschienen am 8. August 2016 | T's Box

Ab
HI-RES2,99 Fr.
CD2,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 17. März 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

Hi-Res
Ab
CD15,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 25. September 2007 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

The photos on the cover and within the booklet of The Real Thing: Words and Sounds, Vol. 3 do not match the music. Does Jill Scott really have to hail a cab? Is she really awakened in the middle of the night by the need to write songs with an anguished look on her face? Really? Because these songs sound like they were written as she was fed chocolate-dipped strawberries while sprawled out on a bed cloaked with rose petals. Well, that's not entirely true -- there are some exceptions, like the furious "Hate on Me," and a couple songs involving deep heartache and sharp admonishments. For the most part (and considerably more so than Scott's first two studio albums), however, The Real Thing is for romancing couples. While some of the collaborators -- Andre Harris, Vidal Davis, Adam Blackstone -- are all over the singer's past releases, there's a handful of relatively new and significant associates, most notably JR Hutson. (Presumably the son of '70s soul great Leroy Hutson, he is listed as "L. Hutson, Jr." in the songwriting credits.) Hutson and Scott co-wrote four of the album's sweetest and steamiest songs, most of which have a few things in common with mid-'70s albums involving any combination of Minnie Riperton, Leon Ware, and Marvin Gaye. 4hero's "Les Fleurs" cover aside, "Come See Me" is the closest anyone has come to channeling Minnie, updating the slowest, most sensual sides of Perfect Angel and Adventures in Paradise. On the other hand, "Crown Royal" maintains that gooey, slightly sleazed-out sound of Marvin's I Want You while dispensing with the double entendres of that touchstone; Scott gets as erotic as ever, even raunchy at points, while making it all sound like poetry instead of straight smut. It's almost like she heard Janet Jackson's Damita Jo and figured, "Yeah, that's nice, but I can do it about ten times better." © Andy Kellman /TiVo
Ab
CD19,19 Fr.

Soul - Erschienen am 25. September 2007 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Ab
CD15,99 Fr.

Soul - Erschienen am 30. August 2011 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Ab
CD19,19 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 18. Juli 2000 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Though start-up label Hidden Beach and its manufacturer/distributor Sony may have been hoping for another Lauryn Hill in this eloquent young African-American from a Middle Atlantic state, Jill Scott turns out to be something of a hip-hop Patti Smith, a street poet who, on her first album, hasn't quite made the transition from spoken word performances to music, despite an excellent singing voice. With any luck, she will retain her sense of the power of words, since the best parts of this album are the ones when she lets fly, drunk on her verbal virtuosity. Producer Jeff Townes (of DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince fame) and his team of associates from the A Touch of Jazz production company set up sympathetic musical backgrounds for Scott that support her without requiring her to fit her spoken and sung excursions into strict meter. That gives her range to pursue her interests, which include a strong sense of her north Philadelphia neighborhood and such idiosyncratic concerns as food, with many meals listed in detail. But the album has a story to tell, and for the most part it is a love story. Scott describes a relationship from many different angles, including an encounter with her boyfriend's ex in a super market ("Exclusively") and her warnings to that girl (or some other) to stay away ("Gettin' in the Way"). She also breaks painfully from an old boyfriend in favor of the new one ("I Think It's Better"), but mostly she celebrates the relationship ("A Long Walk," "He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat)," "It's Love," "The Way"). But with "Honey Molasses," things turn sour, and on "Love Rain" and "Slowly Surely," she frees herself, concluding that "One Is the Magic #" and toward the end of the album moving on to social concerns with "Watching Me" and "Brotha." This narrative structure gives Scott ample room to express a variety of emotions and to display her "verbal elation." Like many poets, she sometimes delights in a torrent of words for their own sake, but it's hard to fault her when the result is such a fully articulated world view. There is no existing slot in R&B/hip-hop into which this album fits, which only means a new one will have to be created. (The CD marks a new complexity in the use of bonus and hidden tracks. After the 17th track, "Show Me," there are 26 four-second blank tracks, followed by a 44th track, the bonus song, "Try." One minute after this song ends, there is a hidden selection, an alternate version of "Love Rain" that features Mos Def.) © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
Ab
CD2,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 29. April 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

Ab
CD15,99 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2008 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

Ab
CD76,79 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 20. November 2001 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC

What you think of Jill Scott's second album, Experience: Jill Scott 826+, is going to depend on how you define the two-hour, double-disc set. Is it, as its title suggests, a live album (recorded mostly on August 26, 2001, in Washington, D.C., hence the "826") plus a bonus disc containing some new studio tracks? Or is it a new studio album with a live disc tacked on? There aren't many artists who can justify the release of a live album after releasing only one studio album, especially when the live album consists almost entirely of material from that one album. The draw here, however, is Scott herself. A performing poet-turned-singer, she clearly knows how to please an audience, and the Washingtonians seem primed, frequently singing along to her songs without prompting and cheering many aspects of the show that can't be appreciated on a mere audio recording of it. If Scott's debut disc found her still in transition from the spoken word to the sung song, she has long since made that shift, and the album is full of vocal pyrotechnics, though, as she herself acknowledges, she talks a lot, even coming off like a standup comic in her defense of her song "Gettin' in the Way." The conceptual unity that tied these songs together on Who Is Jill Scott? Words and Sounds, Vol. 1 is missing here, but there's no denying Scott's effectiveness as a performer. The "+" disc, however, sounds like a collection of demos for her next album rather than a stand-alone document, even before the extended hidden tracks at the end present alternate versions. (Don't believe the one-minute-and-48-second time listed for the last track; it really runs over 16 minutes.) So, let's call this a satisfying live album with some bonus tracks, a good seasonal stocking-stuffer. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
Ab
CD2,09 Fr.

R&B - Erschienen am 12. April 2011 | Hidden Beach Records, LLC