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CD14,49 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 25. Januar 2011 | 4AD

Auszeichnungen 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
The ongoing journey of Sam Beam from bedroom mystic to ringleader of a slick stadium indie rock band is completed on 2011’s Kiss Each Other Clean. While the previous Iron & Wine album, The Shepherd's Dog, was also very produced and pro-sounding, this album is huge. Beam, a cast of many, and producer Brian Deck have embellished the songs with a ton of studio tricks, a wide variety of instruments from flute to squelchy old synths, and a tightly arranged, loosely flowing feel that anyone who was initially enraptured by Beam’s early recordings might be hard-pressed to recognize. (Though Beam’s voice is still as haunting and intimate as ever for the most part. As is his beard.) Once you accept that I&W are now as established as a “real” band on par with Wilco or the Flaming Lips, some questions arise. Are they still any good? Can Beam still capture a heart with a tender melody and an aching vocal despite all the tricks and sax solos? Does the musicianship on display overpower the songs? Will Beam survive in the big leagues? Most of these questions were answered in the affirmative on the last album; they are reaffirmed here. Beam still writes and sings in a voice that could penetrate even the most syrupy backing -- nothing will likely ever change that. His lyrics have the same broken and bruised poetry they’ve always had, only now they are surrounded by haunting and inventive arrangements that are even more intricate and interesting than on The Shepherd's Dog. This time, Beam and company bring in soft rock smoothness, dub reggae textures, and instruments that haven’t really been featured on previous records. The vintage synths in particular deserve mention; whether they are bubbling like mad on “Monkeys Uptown” or getting Stevie Wonder-funky on “Big Burned Hand,” they give the otherwise very organic-sounding arrangements a welcome cheesy kick. Other aspects that deserve praise are Sarah Simpson’s sweetly sung backing vocals and Deck’s production. He layers instruments and mixes sound like he’s baking a giant cake, giving the songs depth and a widescreen scope in the process. Beam couldn’t have picked a better person for the job of blowing his music up to the large-scale work of beauty it has become. If you’ve been on board since the beginning, you have to marvel at the perfectly timed and logical way the music has progressed. No one could ever accuse Beam of selling out his art, only growing up and building it up. Kiss Each Other Clean is the result of years of growth and change, and though that sounds incredibly boring, it’s also a record full of roiling emotion, tender wit, and deeply felt melodic beauty. In other words, a standard issue Iron & Wine record. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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CD14,49 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 16. April 2013 | 4AD

Auszeichnungen 3F de Télérama - 5/6 de Magic
Seit 2002 hat Sam Beam alias Iron & Wine eine erstaunliche musikalische Entwicklung durchgemacht. War sein Debüt "The Creek Drank The Cradle", weitgehend mit Akustikgitarre und Stimme aufgenommen, noch eine klassische Singer/Songwriter-Angelegenheit, tauchten 2011 auf "Kiss Each Other Clean" Synthetizer, Funk und Jazz auf. Und zwar in einem solchen Maße, dass es schwer fiel, den Künstler dahinter als ein und denselben zu erkennen. "Ghost On Ghost" setzt diese Entwicklung fort. Die Experimentierfreude hat nicht nachgelassen, im Gegenteil. Zur Stamminstrumentierung aus Gitarren, Bass, Schlagzeug, Percussion, Orgel und der einprägsamen Pedal Steel-Gitarre von Paul Niehaus (Calexico, Lambchop) gesellen sich Streicher, Bläser und weibliche Chöre. Erstaunlich, was Beam und Produzent Brian Deck mit dem bunten Ensemble zustande bringen. Der Opener "Caught In The Briars" beginnt mit 20 Sekunden kakophonischem Aufwärmen, setzt sich mit einer Akustikgitarre sowie Sams hoher Stimme fort und endet mit einer jazzigen Improvisation. Dazwischen kommen unter anderem Hörner und ein Klavier zum Einsatz. Im weiteren Verlauf spielen Gitarren nur eine untergeordnete Rolle. "The Desert Babbler", das nach 70er-Soulpop inklusive Hollywood-Streichern und Falsetto klingt, erinnert mal an George Michael, mal an die Bee Gees. Die geringfügig bessere Hälfte von Wham! scheint es Beam angetan zu haben, denn auch im weiteren Verlauf klingen die Stimmen immer wieder nacheinander, etwa in der Klavierballade "Joy" oder in "Grass Windows". Mit krudem Chartspop hat Beam jedoch nichts am Hut, dafür sind seine Arrangements viel zu vertrackt und das Schlagzeug zu verspielt. Trotz aller anderen Instrumente nimmt es schon fast die zentrale Rolle ein, so in "Low Light Buddy Of Mine" oder "Grace For Saints And Ramblers". Das Zusammenspiel zwischen Schlagzeug und Bass in "Singers And The Endless Songs" oder "Lover's Revolution" nötigt Respekt ab. Niehaus' Pedal Steele im abschließenden "Baby Center Stage" ist sensationell. Ein weiteres Merkmal ist das Verhältnis von Klang zu Stille. Erstaunlich, wie es Beam und Deck gelingt, viele Stücke fast schon minimalistisch tönen zu lassen, obwohl eine ganze Menge passiert. Wobei gerade darin der Schwachpunkt des Albums liegt: Das Führungsduo legt soviel Tatendrang an den Tag, dass ein roter Faden fehlt, der die Stücke vereint. So handelt es sich eher um eine lose, bunte Sammlung als um ein organisches Ganzes. Anno 2013 präsentieren Iron & Wine anspruchsvolles Easy Listening, das sich schwer einordnen lässt. Für diejenigen, die Sam Beam für seine frühe Werke mögen, sicherlich ungewohnt, dennoch eine Hörprobe wert. Auch wenn mehrere Durchläufe und aufmerksames Lauschen vonnöten sind, um sich mit "Ghost On Ghost" anzufreunden. Am besten bei ordentlicher Lautstärke. © Laut
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 17. Juli 2015 | Black Cricket - Brown Records

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It turns out that bearded gents Sam Beam of Iron & Wine and Ben Bridwell of Band of Horses were friends in their hometown of Columbia, South Carolina back before they were ever touring-bill companions or Sub Pop labelmates (mid- to late aughts), and well before they recorded a covers album together. Perhaps a studio collaboration was inevitable or even overdue given their amity, frequent path-crossing, and shared tastes and influences represented small-scale here on the 12-track Sing Into My Mouth. The title is taken from lyrics in the opening track, "This Must Be the Place" by Talking Heads, a sign of the relative diversity to come, which bridges Sade, John Cale, El Perro del Mar, and Peter La Farge. The Talking Heads tune is a toned-down take with acoustic and slide guitars, bass, piano, accordion, and light percussion, representative of an album full of slide guitar-heavy arrangements that fall squarely within folky expectations. Versions most similar to the originals include Ronnie Lane's "Done This One Before," '70s U.K. band Unicorn's "No Way Out of Here" (better known via David Gilmore's cover), Spiritualized's "Straight and Narrow," and fellow South Carolinians the Marshall Tucker Band's beautifully spare "Ab's Song" -- all folk-inspired or twang-leaning to begin with, and covered affectionately with Beam and Bridwell trading lead-vocal duty throughout the record. Most altered are the duo's reworkings of the strings-supported, Brill Building-esque "God Knows (You Gotta Give to Get)" by Sweden's El Perro del Mar, which is slowed down here and given an earthy woodwind and guitar delivery; Sade's "Bullet Proof Soul," which still sounds uniquely Sade despite a rootsy rearrangement; and Them Two's 1967 soul plea "Am I a Good Man?," previously covered by Bridwell's Band of Horses and captured with enthusiasm on Sing Into My Mouth by piano, reed instruments, electric guitars, bass, and percussion. Other songs include Bonnie Raitt's "Anyday Woman," John Cale's "You Know Me More Than I Know," and J.J. Cale's "Magnolia." That kind of variety keeps things interesting, though none of the arrangements comes as a real surprise with the exception of the closer, "Coyote, My Little Brother" (later covered by Pete Seeger but recorded by its songwriter Peter La Farge in 1963), a yodeling, Native American-inspired lament that gets full dream pop treatment with Bridwell on lead. Still, the represented songwriters and the sequencing, which nimbly waltzes through 50 years of song selections beginning with a quirky new wave tune and ending with a howling cautionary ballad, are rendered with grace. Those attracted to the collaboration's premise will very likely appreciate its results. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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CD17,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 17. Juli 2015 | Black Cricket - Brown Records

It turns out that bearded gents Sam Beam of Iron & Wine and Ben Bridwell of Band of Horses were friends in their hometown of Columbia, South Carolina back before they were ever touring-bill companions or Sub Pop labelmates (mid- to late aughts), and well before they recorded a covers album together. Perhaps a studio collaboration was inevitable or even overdue given their amity, frequent path-crossing, and shared tastes and influences represented small-scale here on the 12-track Sing Into My Mouth. The title is taken from lyrics in the opening track, "This Must Be the Place" by Talking Heads, a sign of the relative diversity to come, which bridges Sade, John Cale, El Perro del Mar, and Peter La Farge. The Talking Heads tune is a toned-down take with acoustic and slide guitars, bass, piano, accordion, and light percussion, representative of an album full of slide guitar-heavy arrangements that fall squarely within folky expectations. Versions most similar to the originals include Ronnie Lane's "Done This One Before," '70s U.K. band Unicorn's "No Way Out of Here" (better known via David Gilmore's cover), Spiritualized's "Straight and Narrow," and fellow South Carolinians the Marshall Tucker Band's beautifully spare "Ab's Song" -- all folk-inspired or twang-leaning to begin with, and covered affectionately with Beam and Bridwell trading lead-vocal duty throughout the record. Most altered are the duo's reworkings of the strings-supported, Brill Building-esque "God Knows (You Gotta Give to Get)" by Sweden's El Perro del Mar, which is slowed down here and given an earthy woodwind and guitar delivery; Sade's "Bullet Proof Soul," which still sounds uniquely Sade despite a rootsy rearrangement; and Them Two's 1967 soul plea "Am I a Good Man?," previously covered by Bridwell's Band of Horses and captured with enthusiasm on Sing Into My Mouth by piano, reed instruments, electric guitars, bass, and percussion. Other songs include Bonnie Raitt's "Anyday Woman," John Cale's "You Know Me More Than I Know," and J.J. Cale's "Magnolia." That kind of variety keeps things interesting, though none of the arrangements comes as a real surprise with the exception of the closer, "Coyote, My Little Brother" (later covered by Pete Seeger but recorded by its songwriter Peter La Farge in 1963), a yodeling, Native American-inspired lament that gets full dream pop treatment with Bridwell on lead. Still, the represented songwriters and the sequencing, which nimbly waltzes through 50 years of song selections beginning with a quirky new wave tune and ending with a howling cautionary ballad, are rendered with grace. Those attracted to the collaboration's premise will very likely appreciate its results. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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HI-RES22,49 Fr.
CD15,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 24. Februar 2015 | Black Cricket Recording Co.

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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 23. März 2004 | SUB POP

Fünfzehn Jahre nach der Veröffentlichung im März 2004 taucht Our Endless Numbered Days als Deluxe Edition erneut auf und das ist eine Gelegenheit für jene, die es vielleicht vergessen hätten, sich von seiner jungfernhaften Schönheit erneut überwältigen zu lassen. Schon 2002 zeigte das Album The Creek Drank The Cradle, wie subtil Iron & Wine wirken kann, denn das aus South-Carolina stammende kleine Genie, und dahinter steckt der struppige Kopf von Sam Beam, präsentiert uns samtweiche Americana. Auf diesem zweiten Album, das er besser im Griff hat als das erste (und es wird noch dazu mit acht unveröffentlichten Demo-Aufnahmen für Hardcore-Fans erweitert), zeigt sich, warum Beam mit seinen sanften Rhythmen, seinen perfekt beherrschten Vokalharmonien und seinem Gespür für schlichte, ungeschliffene Melodien unter seinen Kollegen hervorstach. Als Rootsmusiker ist er in gewisser Weise ein amerikanischer Nachkomme von Nick Drake. Sein Feingefühl in Sachen Folk ist nicht in die Jahre gekommen, und man hört es in Naked As We Came und erst recht im besten Stück des Albums, Sunset Soon Forgotten. Es trifft einen mitten ins Herz, mehr als das, was Iron & Wine in der Folge einspielen sollte. Dieses Jugendwerk war nämlich bereits ein ganz und gar ausgereiftes Werk. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 25. September 2007 | SUB POP

Iron & Wine have shown an impressive work ethic since the release of The Creek Drank the Cradle in 2002. A flood of singles, EPs, and albums, each with high levels of quality, have made Iron & Wine and Sam Beam stars in the indie rock world. Introspective, leaning toward morose, and heavily bearded stars, but glittering just the same. 2007's The Shepherd's Dog goes a long way toward validating all the attention I&W have been getting; it's their best, most diverse, and most listenable record yet, as Beam and co. take another leap away from the lo-fi, one-dude-in-a-bedroom beginnings of the group. Here Beam surrounds himself with a large cast of musicians, and they blanket the songs with a wide array of instrumentation, everything from accordions to Hammond organ, piano to backward guitars, vibraphone to bass harmonica. Nothing too strange in the everything-goes world of indie rock circa 2007, but for Iron & Wine, it's a widescreen revelation. Perhaps working with Calexico on 2005's In the Reins inspired Beam to use all the colors in the paint box. Maybe it's a natural progression. Either way it leads to an inspiringly lush album, full of imaginative and rich arrangements. Not to say Beam has cast aside the vital elements that made the band so interesting to begin with; his whispered vocals still conjure shadowy mystery, the songs are still melancholy as hell at their core, and as always there's a lingering sense of Southern gothic foreboding shrouding the proceedings. The increased production values take these elements and goose them. The recognizably I&W songs like the dark and creepy "Peace Beneath the City" or the gloomy country ballad "Resurrection Fern" sound bigger and have a different kind of impact. Take "Boy with a Coin," which in the past would have been spare, spooky, and a bit insular, but now is huge and spooky thanks to the propulsive handclaps and atmospheric backward guitars that would make Daniel Lanois jealous. Along with these pumped-up variations on the band's classic sound, there are songs you'd never imagine hearing on an Iron & Wine album. The danceable (!) "House by the Sea" has jumpy Afro-pop underpinnings and a bit of wild abandon in Beam's more passionate-than-usual vocals; "Wolves (Song of the Shepherd's Dog)" is a funky mix of David Essex's "Rock On," a backwoods-sounding Meters, and of all things, dub reggae; and most shockingly, "The Devil Never Sleeps" actually rocks with a rollicking barroom piano, a loping tempo, bongos, and lyrics about nothing on the radio, leading to a sound that's ironically perfect for the radio. By the end of the record, you may feel a few pangs for the discarded, sparse sound of early Iron & Wine, but the beauty and majesty of The Shepherd's Dog will pave right over them, and you should be able to enjoy the masterful songcraft, inspired performance, and note-perfect production with no guilt and a fair bit of awe. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 25. August 2017 | SUB POP

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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 23. März 2004 | SUB POP

On Our Endless Numbered Days, the follow-up to 2002's stunningly good Creek Drank the Cradle, the sound of Iron & Wine has changed but the song remains the same. No longer does Sam Beam record his intimate songs in the intimate surroundings of his home. Instead he has made the jump to the recording studio. As a result the record is much cleaner, less cocoon-like, certainly more the product of someone who has become a professional musician and not someone who just records for fun on a four-track. However, all Beam has sacrificed is sound quality. The sound of the record is still very intimate and simple, with very subtle arrangements that leave his voice and lyrics as the focal point. Luckily all the technology in the world can't affect Beam's voice, which still sounds like it comes right from his lips into your ear as if he were an angel perched on your shoulder. His songs are still as strong and memorable as they were on Creek, no drop off whatsoever in quality. "Naked as We Came" with sparkling melody lovely background harmonies by his sister Sarah; the aching folk ballad "Radio War," which wouldn't sound out of place on Prairie Home Companion, only it would be the best thing you ever heard there; the sad and sweet "Each Coming Night"; the crystalline acoustic guitar ballad "Fever Dream," which has the kind of vocal harmony between Beam and his sister that seems to be the exclusive domain of siblings; and the soft rock CSNY "Sodom, South Georgia" are the equal of anything on Iron & Wine's debut and match up well with anything Palace, Smog, or their ilk have done lately. A definite plus to recording in a studio and enlisting the help of outside musicians is that there is much more variety to the album and there are lots of small production touches that liven things up like the Native American chants at the close of "Cinder and Smoke," the pedal steel guitar on "Sunset Soon Forgotten," and the drums and tambourine on the bluesy "Free Until They Cut Me Down." Our Endless Numbered Days is very subdued, thoughtful, melodic, and downright beautiful album and the new sound is more of a progression than a sudden shift in values, production or otherwise. Anyone who found the first album to be wonderful will no doubt feel the same about this one. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 24. September 2002 | SUB POP

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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 19. Mai 2009 | SUB POP

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CD11,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 22. Februar 2005 | SUB POP

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CD9,59 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 9. September 2003 | SUB POP

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HI-RES12,59 Fr.
CD8,39 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 7. Mai 2021 | SUB POP

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Recorded while Iron & Wine's Sam Beam was a student at Florida State University in the late '90s, this set of songs is a prelude to his stunning Sub Pop debut, The Creek Drank the Cradle. Featuring Beam on acoustic guitar, vocals, and drums with roommate (and future I&W bandmate) EJ Holowicki on bass, there's a homemade feel to the set that's not quite as magical as Creek, but still very nicely intimate and lo-fi. Definitely less loner singing his heart out in a lonely room and more two dudes laying down some good country-adjacent tunes over a few beers. There are some clunky guitar solos, out-of-time guitars, and bass rumbles to contend with, as well as a couple of songs that sound like the work of someone still finding their voice. Mostly, though, the things that make Iron & Wine so lovely are here in nascent form. Beam's voice already has the power to rivet the listener to the speaker in awe of the warmth and feeling he transmits with seemingly no effort. His croon feels like the confession of a close friend, and on songs like "Cold Town" and "Why Hate Winter" (which sounds like backwoods Codeine) it's impossible to escape the raw emotion. There are also a few ghostly vocal harmonies -- like on the halting ballad "Show Him the Ground" -- that point the way to Creek's incredible sound. His lyrics here aren't always as insightful as they came to be -- the occasional lyrical turn feels less than polished -- but there's still plenty of sincere thoughtfulness on display. As far as lost, pre-fame recordings go, Archive Series No.5: Tallahassee Recordings is a genuine find. It skips over the one-off shot of brilliance that is Creek and provides a template for what Iron & Wine would sound like with more filled-out backing and a jauntier, less insular feel. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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HI-RES11,99 Fr.
CD7,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 31. August 2018 | SUB POP

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Diese EP bildet eine Einheit mit dem im Jahre 2017 erschienenen Album Beast Epic und zwar deswegen, weil ihre sechs Titel bei derselben Aufnahmesession entstanden sind. Sam Beam hatte also schon geplant, ein Jahr später mit einer herrlichen Überraschung in der Hand wiederzukommen. Damit haben wir eine tellurisch inspirierte Platte, die alles Unkraut hinter sich lässt, um einen freudestrahlenden Weg offenzulegen. Der Mastermind von Iron & Wine bleibt mit dieser romantischen EP den folkloristischen Balladen und dahintreibenden Refrains treu. Das Ganze schweift in mehr oder weniger neblige Erinnerungen versunken durch das Land. Iron & Wine war noch nie seinem Namen so gerecht geworden. In einem erhabenen, halbtrunkenen Zustand bringt er bestimmte, schmerzhafte Themen zur Sprache. Waves of Gavelston handelt von den tragischen Ereignissen, die sich im Jahre 1900 in der texanischen Stadt zugetragen haben, als sie von einem Wirbelsturm vernichtet wurde. Anhand einer einfachen Folk-Melodie stellt sich Sam Beam ein Jahrhundert später die Katastrophe vor und die Stille nach dem Sturm. Zarter Gesang („There's a graveyard by the pizza parlor“ / „Papa left you for Heaven after your Mama lost her song“) untermalt auf wunderbare Weise eine ergreifende Beschreibung der Umgebung. Der amerikanische Songwriter hat dieses Talent, Gefühle ums Zehnfache zu steigern, ohne irgendwelche Schnörkel. Nach einer psychedelischen Folkballade und gemäßigtem Groove (What Hurts Worse) landet man plötzlich bei einem recht coolen Folk (Last of Your Rock'n'Roll Heroes), um schließlich seriöse Musik mit Cellos und ein paar auf dem Klavier gespielten Noten wahrzunehmen (Milkweed). Mit der in Weed Garden enthaltenen reichhaltigen, zarten Poesie voller Optimismus wird Iron & Wine seine Fans sicher begeistern. © Clara Bismuth/Qobuz
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CD7,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 8. Oktober 2011 | SUB POP

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CD5,75 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 5. Dezember 2011 | 4AD

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HI-RES2,99 Fr.
CD1,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 2. Juni 2017 | Black Cricket Recording Co.

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CD1,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 7. April 2021 | Sub Pop Records

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CD1,99 Fr.

Alternativ und Indie - Erschienen am 8. Juni 2017 | SUB POP