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CD21,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 24. November 2017 | London Music Stream - Because Music

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CD11,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Juli 1986 | London Music Stream - Because Music

After becoming one of the biggest girl groups in U.K. pop music history, and after scoring a Top Ten U.S. hit with "Cruel Summer," Bananarama reached the commercial pinnacle of their career with their third album, True Confessions. This album also marked an artistic change of pace for the trio because they began to utilize super hit producers Stock, Aitken & Waterman, who helped them turn the 1970 rock hit "Venus" into an unstoppable, unforgettable dance smash. In fact, their version was so huge that it became their only U.S. number one hit. The rest of the album, however, is a little darker than one might expect, with heavy lyrics and themes permeating the songs. Other highlights include the second single, "More Than Physical," which was also produced by Stock, Aitken & Waterman, the moody third single, "Trick of the Night," the saucy "Hooked on Love," the dance-pop of "Promised Land," and the seductive "Dance with a Stranger." To some, True Confessions was a departure of sorts from the post-punk, new wave girl group sound that made Bananarama so essential to early-'80s British alt-pop music. To others, it represents a shift to platinum success (which continued with their follow-up album, Wow!), and this album, along with the hit "Venus," are prime examples of classic '80s dance-pop music. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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CD11,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. September 1987 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Bananarama followed up their hit-laden True Confessions, which spawned their international chart-topping version of "Venus," with 1987's Wow! True Confessions witnessed the emerging role of Stock, Aitken & Waterman as the trio's producers -- Wow! was wholly assembled by the hitmaking team, which was also responsible for hits by Rick Astley, Kylie Minogue, Dead or Alive, Donna Summer, and countless others. This album is, therefore, a straightforward 1980s dance set, with several songs that went on to become international hits. The only track from this set to make the U.S. Top Ten was "I Heard a Rumour," a sassy, joyous single just as infectious today as when first released. Also included is the sleek, lip-smackin' disco hit "I Can't Help It," the engaging, European chart-topper "Love in the First Degree," the single "I Want You Back," and an extended mix of their version of the Supremes' "Nathan Jones." Some of the non-hits pale in comparison to the singles, among those the dated, 12" version of "Some Girls"; the 12" version of "Strike It Rich," which, at some points, resembles an inferior version of "I Can't Help It"; and "Bad for Me," which unintentionally highlights the trio's vocal limitations. Nonetheless, the singles were quite intoxicating, and this hard-to-find set is sure to please fans of Bananarama, or any fans of the Stock, Aitken & Waterman sound, which ruled the airwaves and nightclubs in the mid- to late '80s. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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CD11,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. März 1983 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Bananarama's first album is by far their best. Before they fell in with the lucrative but often boring Stock, Aitken & Waterman assembly line starting with 1986's True Confessions, Siobhan Fahey, Sarah Dallin, and Keren Woodward were unashamedly poppy, but they had enough artistic credibility to create a debut album that, barring a couple of small missteps, actually works as an album instead of a collection of singles with some filler. (They were even hip enough for their first single to be produced by ex-Sex Pistol Paul Cook.) Of course, the singles are terrific. There are four British chart hits in these 11 songs, and every one of them still sounds terrific, where later hits like "I Can't Help It" are terribly dated. The slinky "Shy Boy" and a rattling cover of the Marvelettes' "He Was Really Sayin' Somethin'" (co-starring the trio's early mentors Fun Boy Three) are classic girl group songs updated for the '80s, every bit as credible as any mid-level Spector or Motown singles. That Cook-produced debut single, "Aie a Mwana" (oddly left off the album's first U.S. edition), now sounds mostly like a curio of the brief tropical craze that hit the U.K. in 1981/1982, but "Cheers Then" is a heartbreaker, an absolutely lovely lost-love song that's possibly the best thing Bananarama ever did and certainly one of the top singles to come out of Great Britain in 1982. Surprisingly, though, Deep Sea Skiving has some album tracks that are the equal of the singles. A funky version of Paul Weller's "Doctor Love" (originally written for Weller's then-girlfriend Tracie Young, whose version came out in 1984) is a killer, as is the countrified "Young at Heart," written by the trio and Fahey's then-boyfriend, Robert Hodgens of the Bluebells (who did their own version on 1984's Sisters). Three more Dallin/Fahey/Woodward compositions present a well-rounded portrait of young girls on their own in the big city, with the bouncy, glammy "Hey Young London" like a night out on the town and the resentful "What a Shambles," a morning-after snit about an out-of-touch star from the point of view of three struggling working-class girls. It's the closing "Wish You Were Here," though, that caps the album's widely varied moods with a romantic wistfulness that's like the emotional flip side of "Cheers Then." Deep Sea Skiving is not perfect. "Boy Trouble" is awfully slight, and a cover of Steam's "Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye" is okay, but basically pointless. Still, it's Bananarama's finest album by far, and an underappreciated pop gem of its era. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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CD11,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Mai 1984 | London Music Stream - Because Music

For their second album, Bananarama underwent a telling change in persona, from the flyaway-haired, overall-clad everygirls of Deep Sea Skiving into a sleeker and glammier look. Similarly, the album has a much more polished feel than the occasionally scattershot debut, which is not always a good thing; sticking with Tony Swain and Steve Jolley to produce the whole thing (the duo had shared production duties with three others on the debut), Bananarama traded their early tropical-tinged playfulness and ironic overtones for a more commercial sound that scored well on the charts (the terrific opener "Cruel Summer" was a worldwide hit, and several other tracks were U.K. hits) but was less unique than before. What's most unusual about Bananarama is the content of the songs. Lyrically, the album is surprisingly serious, with topics ranging from sectarian violence in Ireland ("Rough Justice") to domestic violence ("King of the Jungle") to drug use ("Hot Line to Heaven"), none of which are in keeping with the trio's frothy image. Indeed, under the singalong chorus, the album's best track, "Robert de Niro's Waiting," turns out to be the traumatized musings of a teenage rape victim, set to an improbably dreamy, carefree melody. Even comparatively light songs like "State I'm In" and "Dream Baby" have an oddly paranoid tone to them. Of course, the detour into mature themes didn't last long, as the group's next album introduced the chart-bound frivolity of Stock-Aitken-Waterman into the picture, but Bananarama in an intriguing and often excellent side trip. Important discographical curiosity: original U.S. copies of Bananarama included an extended seven-minute take of "Hot Line to Heaven." After the fall 1984 release of the single "The Wild Life" (the theme to Cameron Crowe's second movie), U.S. copies of Bananarama were altered to include the new single at the start of side two, followed by the superior single edit of "Hot Line to Heaven." © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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CD11,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Mai 1991 | London Music Stream - Because Music

Despite the title, the sole Bananarama album to feature Siobhan Fahey's replacement, Jacquie O'Sullivan, is the vocal trio's decisive break from pop music into Hi-NRG dance. Recorded with a variety of writer/producers ranging all the way back to their original mentor, Steve Jolley (also including Stock-Aitken-Waterman, the architects of their biggest hits, and former Killing Joke bassist Youth, for alt-dance cred), the songs are united by their emphasis on MIDI synthesizers and canned beats. Lacking their most distinctive vocalist (the competent but colorless O'Sullivan was no match for Fahey's occasionally off-key yelp), the trio sounds utterly anonymous, like session singers on their own album. More to the point, whoever suggested that the Doobie Brothers' stoner rock anthem "Long Train Running" was a suitable vehicle for an electronic dance-pop remake should be punished. Severely. That said, the acid house-tinged single "Tripping on Your Love" is actually pretty good. © Stewart Mason /TiVo
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CD11,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 26. April 1993 | London Music Stream - Because Music

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CD17,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 14. September 2018 | LiveHereNow

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CD11,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 11. Mai 2015 | Cooking Vinyl

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HI-RES20,49 Fr.
CD16,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 19. April 2019 | IN SYNK

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Working with producers Richard X and Ian Masterson, Bananarama achieve an interesting thing with In Stereo, their first full-length album in a decade. They manage to refresh a retro vibe, adhering to the Euro-dance sound that's been their specialty since the group became a duo, but not sounding precisely like a throwback. Credit goes to how Keren Woodward and Sarah Dallin retain an infatuation with classic girl group pop structure, a foundation that allows for a bunch of glitzy neo-disco and pseudo-house accoutrements. If Bananarama aren't precisely dealing with new trends in dance, there's also a certain dignity in how they're faithful to the sounds of the '80s, '90s, and Y2K: it doesn't feel like they're outdated as much as sticking to what they know looks good on them. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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CD4,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Februar 1989 | London Music Stream

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CD11,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 29. April 2005 | A&G Records

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CD12,99 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 14. September 2009 | Strike Force Entertainment

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CD16,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. November 2019 | IN SYNK

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CD16,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 7. August 2020 | IN SYNK

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HI-RES2,99 Fr.
CD2,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 18. Januar 2019 | IN SYNK

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HI-RES2,99 Fr.
CD2,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 24. April 2019 | IN SYNK

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CD10,59 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2012 | Touch Records

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HI-RES2,99 Fr.
CD2,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 8. März 2019 | IN SYNK

Hi-Res
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CD2,49 Fr.

Pop - Erschienen am 11. Oktober 2019 | IN SYNK