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HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 6. November 2015 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen 5 de Diapason - Choc de Classica
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HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 24. November 2014 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet
The portraits referred to here are musical ones: German soprano Dorothea Röschmann offers Lieder devoted to some of the common women of German Romantic song: Mignon, Gretchen, and Mary Stuart. There are also some Strauss songs that don't fit the concept, and the program is similar enough to any number of other Lieder recitals. The news, though, lies in Röschmann's daring interpretations, especially of the group of songs by Schubert. They are likely to be a matter of taste, but nobody is going to be able to accuse Röschmann of merely following in others' footsteps. She is an operatic specialist with a middle-aged, slightly dark voice, and it's hard to imagine her as Goethe's waif Mignon, although in Schumann's brief Gedichte von Königin Maria Stuart, Op. 135, she's more natural. But her boldest strokes have to do not with characterization, but with rhythm: Schubert's strophic structures are pushed and pulled into shapes where they seem closer to the Hugo Wolf Mignon settings at the end rather than to the early 19th century. You could argue that Schubert's settings presupposed a dramatic development that needed to be brought out more, or that Röschmann's singing merely distorts a song like Gretchen am Spinnrade, which depends on motor rhythms it doesn't get here. You pay your money and you take your chances, but the sensitive accompaniment by pianist Malcolm Martineau is hard to fault either way. © TiVo
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CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 4. Dezember 2015 | Sony Classical - Daniel Taylor

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CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Dezember 2017 | Sony Classical - Daniel Taylor

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CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 30. April 2009 | Sony Classical

Ab
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 24. November 2014 | Sony Classical

The portraits referred to here are musical ones: German soprano Dorothea Röschmann offers Lieder devoted to some of the common women of German Romantic song: Mignon, Gretchen, and Mary Stuart. There are also some Strauss songs that don't fit the concept, and the program is similar enough to any number of other Lieder recitals. The news, though, lies in Röschmann's daring interpretations, especially of the group of songs by Schubert. They are likely to be a matter of taste, but nobody is going to be able to accuse Röschmann of merely following in others' footsteps. She is an operatic specialist with a middle-aged, slightly dark voice, and it's hard to imagine her as Goethe's waif Mignon, although in Schumann's brief Gedichte von Königin Maria Stuart, Op. 135, she's more natural. But her boldest strokes have to do not with characterization, but with rhythm: Schubert's strophic structures are pushed and pulled into shapes where they seem closer to the Hugo Wolf Mignon settings at the end rather than to the early 19th century. You could argue that Schubert's settings presupposed a dramatic development that needed to be brought out more, or that Röschmann's singing merely distorts a song like Gretchen am Spinnrade, which depends on motor rhythms it doesn't get here. You pay your money and you take your chances, but the sensitive accompaniment by pianist Malcolm Martineau is hard to fault either way. © TiVo
Ab
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 28. Februar 2008 | RCA Red Seal

Booklet
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CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 23. Januar 2009 | RCA Red Seal

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HI-RES34,49 Fr.
CD24,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 30. März 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen 4 étoiles Classica
Valentina Lisitsa's double-CD of the music of Philip Glass is a generous collection of excerpts drawn from his film music, including The Hours, The Truman Show, and Mishima, as well as from concert works, such as Glassworks, How Now, The Metamorphosis, and Mad Rush, among other selections. While Glass achieved fame through his early ensemble pieces, where he developed a bright-edged sound through the use of electronic keyboards, his minimalism is easily adaptable to the piano, though the characteristic ostinato patterns that gave his earlier scores a fierce energy are somewhat softened in the piano's blander sonorities and more introspective tone. Lisitsa has found a niche in playing minimalist music, as she demonstrated on her successful 2014 album, Chasing Pianos, where she explored the film music of Michael Nyman. This collection is a natural follow-up, and Lisitsa's aptitude for Glass' style is shown in her steady, rocking rhythms and even dynamics, as well as in her poignantly lyrical expressions. One might not have predicted this route for a pianist who started her career by playing Chopin and Rachmaninov on YouTube, but Lisitsa's success has had a lot to do with taking big chances, and here they have paid off handsomely. © TiVo
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CD38,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 15. April 2016 | Decca (UMO) (Classics)

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HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 26. März 2013 | Mercury KX

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen Hi-Res Audio
Following his recordings on Deutsche Grammophon of music by Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt, Chinese pianist Yundi Li takes on the three most popular piano sonatas of Ludwig van Beethoven, the "Pathétique," "Moonlight," and "Appassionata." Known for having brilliant technique and dynamic showmanship, Yundi plays against type in these beloved works, which call for more introspection and expressiveness than might be expected from him. Even though the outer movements of "Pathétique" and "Appassionata" and the last movement of "Moonlight" give Yundi ample opportunity to demonstrate his agility, power, and high energy, they are relatively restrained, compared to the kind of virtuosic fare that made him an international star. Furthermore, the Classical impulse that informed these sonatas calls for a balance of moods, not just bravura playing. The slow movements let Yundi show he is more than just a flashy technician, and he gives carefully considered performances that work, albeit as fairly Romantic readings. Because Beethoven's piano sonatas have been interpreted and recorded by pianists too numerous to count, it's easy to dismiss performances that fall short of the great recordings of the past, especially any that seem addressed to a mainstream audience. Yundi's CD will not impress connoisseurs who have already settled on their favorite recordings, though casual listeners may like what Yundi does with the music and learn more about Beethoven as a result. © TiVo
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HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 15. Juli 2013 | Mercury KX

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen Hi-Res Audio
Ab
HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. April 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice
This collection of French choral pieces may be designated an amûse-bouche, or chef's-choice hors d'oeuvre, but it makes a superb if light meal in itself, prepared by the English ensemble I Fagiolini ("The Little Beans"). You might be suspicious on grounds of previous early music specialists who have functioned well in only the most severe sort of 20th century music, but dig in! The centerpiece here is a world recorded premiere from the always delicious Jean Françaix (1912-1997), Ode à la Gastronomie. This sets (and often comically distorts and parodies) passages from an early (1825) classic of food writing, Brillat-Savarin's La physiologie du goût. Including a fart joke later on, the work begins with the words "Adam, and you dear Eve, who led us to perdition for an apple, what would you have done for a turkey?" Françaix's platter pokes fun not only at French attitudes toward food but even a bit toward his own neoclassic style itself. The rest of the music is sensuous rather than funny, with choral songs by Poulenc, Milhaud, and Jean-Yves Daniel-Lesur (Le Cantique des Cantiques, or Song of Songs, sorely underrated), interspersed with Satie Gnossiènnes. For the dessert course there's an original work: a choral arrangement by Roderick Williams of the slow movement from Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major. This is given fragments of text by Rimbaud and Baudelaire; take conductor Robert Hollingworth's advice and don't worry too much about the words (which aren't included along with the rest of the texts in the CD booklet), and you'll drift away into ecstasy by the end. The rather remote church acoustic doesn't suit a program that consists of chamber music par excellence, but in terms of choosing original repertoire and putting it together into a program that sustains a flavor in a satisfying way, this is nonpareil. © TiVo
Ab
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 26. März 2013 | Mercury KX

Booklet
Following his recordings on Deutsche Grammophon of music by Frédéric Chopin and Franz Liszt, Chinese pianist Yundi Li takes on the three most popular piano sonatas of Ludwig van Beethoven, the "Pathétique," "Moonlight," and "Appassionata." Known for having brilliant technique and dynamic showmanship, Yundi plays against type in these beloved works, which call for more introspection and expressiveness than might be expected from him. Even though the outer movements of "Pathétique" and "Appassionata" and the last movement of "Moonlight" give Yundi ample opportunity to demonstrate his agility, power, and high energy, they are relatively restrained, compared to the kind of virtuosic fare that made him an international star. Furthermore, the Classical impulse that informed these sonatas calls for a balance of moods, not just bravura playing. The slow movements let Yundi show he is more than just a flashy technician, and he gives carefully considered performances that work, albeit as fairly Romantic readings. Because Beethoven's piano sonatas have been interpreted and recorded by pianists too numerous to count, it's easy to dismiss performances that fall short of the great recordings of the past, especially any that seem addressed to a mainstream audience. Yundi's CD will not impress connoisseurs who have already settled on their favorite recordings, though casual listeners may like what Yundi does with the music and learn more about Beethoven as a result. © TiVo
Ab
CD30,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2013 | Decca (UMO)

Ab
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 3. Juni 2016 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Booklet
This release by accordionist Ksenija Sidorova is a bit difficult to classify, and therein lies its considerable appeal. It contains tunes from Bizet's Carmen, some of the most familiar tunes in the entire classical repertory. The accordion, an instrument on the fringes of the tradition, cannot help but evoke the strolling musicians of a century ago who might have made a living by playing operatic hits just like these. Yet the album is not a contemporary crossover release, nor one bringing nostalgia for the east European cafes of a century ago. Get past the novelty and you'll find a striking variety of treatments of Bizet's music. Sidorova is accompanied by no fewer than three ensembles: a chamber wind-and-string group called Nuevo Mundo, a trio of piano, guitar, and percussion, and the Borusan Istanbul Philharmonic Orchestra, candidly touted in the booklet as having "set its sights on becoming an orchestra of the finest calibre" (it may be that they're already there). You might think the musical results would be all over the map, but the mix of slinky accordion, jazz-like percussion, and careful chamber arrangements of Bizet's tunes holds together. Credit may go to musical director and pianist Michael Abramovich, but it accrues as well to Sidorova, who has both the chops and the attitude to pull off a project that's fun and sexy, sure, but also bracing and novel. © James Manheim /TiVo
Ab
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. April 2016 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Booklet
This collection of French choral pieces may be designated an amûse-bouche, or chef's-choice hors d'oeuvre, but it makes a superb if light meal in itself, prepared by the English ensemble I Fagiolini ("The Little Beans"). You might be suspicious on grounds of previous early music specialists who have functioned well in only the most severe sort of 20th century music, but dig in! The centerpiece here is a world recorded premiere from the always delicious Jean Françaix (1912-1997), Ode à la Gastronomie. This sets (and often comically distorts and parodies) passages from an early (1825) classic of food writing, Brillat-Savarin's La physiologie du goût. Including a fart joke later on, the work begins with the words "Adam, and you dear Eve, who led us to perdition for an apple, what would you have done for a turkey?" Françaix's platter pokes fun not only at French attitudes toward food but even a bit toward his own neoclassic style itself. The rest of the music is sensuous rather than funny, with choral songs by Poulenc, Milhaud, and Jean-Yves Daniel-Lesur (Le Cantique des Cantiques, or Song of Songs, sorely underrated), interspersed with Satie Gnossiènnes. For the dessert course there's an original work: a choral arrangement by Roderick Williams of the slow movement from Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major. This is given fragments of text by Rimbaud and Baudelaire; take conductor Robert Hollingworth's advice and don't worry too much about the words (which aren't included along with the rest of the texts in the CD booklet), and you'll drift away into ecstasy by the end. The rather remote church acoustic doesn't suit a program that consists of chamber music par excellence, but in terms of choosing original repertoire and putting it together into a program that sustains a flavor in a satisfying way, this is nonpareil. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 29. Januar 2021 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Nach dem schmählichen Fiasko seiner Sinfonie Nr. 1 bei ihrer Uraufführung am 15. März 1897 versank der junge Rachmaninow in tiefe Depression. Während einer medizinischen Hypnose-Behandlung komponierte er zum Ausgleich dieses Misserfolgs das 2. Klavierkonzert. Die Erste Sinfonie ist sehr ambitioniert. Der junge Komponist wollte so viel zum Ausdruck bringen, dass das Werk nach dem Geständnis ihres Autors, der sie später schlecht machte, zu schwülstig, überladen und formal unverständlich wurde. Die unselige Partitur durfte zu Lebzeiten des Komponisten nie wieder gespielt werden und das Manuskript ging verloren. Sie wurde später vermutlich mit Hilfe der Orchesterstimmen rekonstruiert und 1945 in Moskau wiederaufgeführt. Hier hören wir die Sinfonie in einer Live-Aufnahme, die 2018 bei einem Konzert des Philadelphia Orchestra unter der lebendigen, kraftvollen und phantasievollen Leitung von Yannick Nézet-Seguin entstand. Nézet-Seguin glaubt an dieses Werk und dirigiert es als ein Meisterwerk und nicht zum Zweck einer wie auch immer gearteten Ehrenrettung. Unter einer derart inspirierten Leitung nimmt dieses jugendliche Opus 13 stolz seinen Platz neben Rachmaninows letztem und erfolgreichsten Werk ein, den berühmten Sinfonischen Tänzen, einer Metapher für die drei Lebensalter des Menschen. Rachmaninows Besessenheit von Glockenklängen und von der christlichen Hymne Dies Irae ist bekannt. Beide Motive kommen in fast allen seinen Werken vor. Er hat sie bereits in der Sinfonie Nr. 1 verwendet, und sie finden sich auch in den Sinfonischen Tänzen wieder. Diese werden hier von dem Orchester, für das sie der Komponist 1940 – drei Jahre vor seinem Tod im kalifornischen Exil – geschrieben hatte, meisterhaft aufgeführt. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 5. Mai 2017 | Decca (UMO)

Ab
CD38,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Decca (UMO)