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HI-RES19,99 Fr.
CD14,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 20. November 1981 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 20. Dezember 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 10. August 2004 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES15,99 Fr.
CD11,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2010 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES19,99 Fr.
CD14,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 14. August 2011 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 26. Dezember 2011 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen Choc de Classica - Hi-Res Audio
To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Franz Liszt's birth, virtuoso pianist Lang Lang has selected some of the composer's most characteristic pieces for his 2011 Sony release, Liszt: My Piano Hero. Prominent on this album is the Piano Concerto No. 1 in E flat major, which features Lang Lang in a high-energy performance with Valery Gergiev and the Vienna Philharmonic. Without a doubt, most of Lang Lang's fans will savor this Romantic showpiece, and for technical brilliance and drama, the performance doesn't disappoint. He is especially lively and vivid in this work, and his interactions with the orchestra seem spontaneous and playful, as one might well imagine Liszt would have been. But Lang Lang seems more introspective and personally involved with the solo keyboard pieces that make up the greater part of the album. Here also is the flashy side of Liszt, but there is a greater emphasis on the poetic and rhapsodic, so Lang Lang indulges in reflective pieces as much as the flashy encores. Highlights include La Campanella, the Grand Galop chromatique, Liebestraum No. 3, the Hungarian Rhapsody No. 6, and the arrangement of Schubert's Ave Maria. © TiVo
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HI-RES21,99 Fr.
CD15,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 28. September 2004 | Archiv Produktion

Hi-Res Auszeichnungen Hi-Res Audio
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 26. Juni 2012 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Having already recorded Beethoven's Fifth and Seventh symphonies for Deutsche Grammophon with phenomenal success, Gustavo Dudamel leads the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela in a bracing rendition of the Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, "Eroica," the second album in a series that promises to become one of the most compelling Beethoven cycles in years. When Dudamel made his first Beethoven disc in 2006, he was just breaking into the classical world's consciousness and was still an unknown quantity for many listeners. Six years later, Dudamel is an international celebrity whose every recording is greeted with enthusiasm and critical praise, both of which are sure to attend this recording. Dudamel brings extraordinary energy and enthusiasm to his interpretation, and the orchestra draws on his charismatic power, giving an electric performance that sustains interest for the work's duration. The Third is always a test of a conductor's control of form and the music's propulsion, and Dudamel performs these seemingly contradictory tasks of making the music coherent and volatile, as it were, finding the meeting point of Classical restraint and Romantic passion at the core of Beethoven. That control and passion are also central to Dudamel's conducting, for they inform each other and make for music that satisfies the intellect while it sends tingles up the spine. The overtures to The Creatures of Prometheus and Egmont are provided as filler works that share certain musical elements in common with "Eroica," and are quite complementary choices. Deutsche Grammophon's sound is spacious and resonant, and the orchestra has wonderful physical presence in the close-up recording. Highly recommended. © TiVo
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 16. September 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Im Jubiläumsjahr 2013 ist eine CD von Anna Netrebko, die sich mit dem Jubilar Giuseppe Verdi befasst, eine fast zwangsläufige Aufgabe für die russische Sopranistin – zumal sie ja unter anderem mit ihrem Auftritt in Verdis "La Traviata" weltbekannt geworden ist. Für die 1971 in Krasnodar geborene Netrebko, die als eine der berühmtesten und erfolgreichsten Opernsängerinnen gilt, stellt Verdi eine Erweiterung ihres Repertoires dar. Auf ihrer ersten Studio-CD seit fünf Jahren beschäftigt sie sich mit einigen der komplexeren Figuren aus Verdis Opern. Neben Elisabetta aus "Don Carlo" nehmen vor allem gleich fünf Stücke aus "Macbeth" und vier Arien aus "Il trovatore" den meisten Raum auf dem Album ein, auf dem auch Tenor Rolando Villazón in einer Szene aus "Il trovatore" zu Gast ist. Abgerundet wird Verdi mit jeweils zwei Stücken aus "Giovanna d’Arco" und "I Vespri Siciliani". Begleitet wird Anna Netrebko vom Chor und Orchester des Teatro Regio Torino unter der Leitung von Dirigent Gianandrea Noseda. Verdi ist im August 2013 bei Deutsche Grammophon erschienen und erreichte in Österreich gleich in der ersten Verkaufswoche Platz 1 der Charts. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES28,99 Fr.
CD20,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 17. Juni 2013 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
The bel canto operas of Gioachino Rossini abound with sparkling coloratura arias, and soprano Aleksandra Kurzak has selected nine examples that highlight this virtuosic style of singing. This CD, Kurzak's second album for Decca, opens with the eponymous aria "Bel raggio lusinghier," from Rossini's Semiramide, and continues with vivacious selections from Guillaume Tell, Tancredi, Matilde di Shabran, Le siège de Corinthe, Il barbiere di Siviglia, Sigismondo, Il turco in Italia, and Elisabetta, regina d'Inghilterra. Kurzak is a leading coloratura soprano, and her ease with runs, leaps, trills, turns, and other melodic embellishments makes this a tour de force of vocal display. Yet these arias are not merely about flashy techniques: the emotions that lead to such florid outbursts of scales and ornaments range from the comic to the dramatic, depending on the characters' variable moods and Rossini's effective scene painting. Kurzak's lively and highly listenable interpretations are sympathetically supported by the Sinfonia Varsova, conducted by Pier Giorgio Morandi. Their credible presence gives each track the big feeling of an operatic scene, and Kurzak's brilliance demonstrates both her charisma and consummate mastery of this art form. Anyone who seeks an appealing introduction to Rossini's music should consider Kurzak an excellent guide. © TiVo
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HI-RES21,99 Fr.
CD15,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 7. Oktober 2013 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen Hi-Res Audio
Milanese-born pianist Maurizio Pollini has a flawless technique that, for his champions, seems to merge with the virtuosic aspect of Beethoven's music. Few would disparage his readings of the late Beethoven sonatas, which like the composer's other late music reside at the limits of playability; Pollini does wonderful things there. Likewise, for Pollini's detractors, he has a willful interpretive streak that can jangle the nerves if you don't connect with what he's doing. There's plenty of ammunition for both sides of the debate on this recording, comprising an attractive selection of four early sonatas, two of them grand four-movement pieces of symphonic scope, and two, the pair of Op. 14 works, small lyrical works that look forward to the Romantics. Pollini does very well with the outer pair, the Piano Sonata No. 4 in E flat major, Op. 7, which was the first sonata to depart decisively from Haydn's world, and the Piano Sonata No. 11 in B flat major, Op. 22, which in Pollini's hands really looks forward to the monumental accomplishments of Beethoven's middle period. The two smaller works of Op.14, however, are a good deal more troublesome. Generally taken as calm, pastoral, Mendelssohnian works, they become with Pollini nervous mutterings, with the major-key passages having the flavor of rushed little etudes. It's without question an original take, but there's a question as to whether it can stand up to precedent. Nevertheless, Pollini has lost neither technical flair nor boldness in his old age, and it's always worth hearing what he has to say. © TiVo
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HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 26. August 2013 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
Before automatically dismissing the idea of the 72-year-old tenor Plácido Domingo reincarnated as a baritone, consider that he started out as one on the zarzuela stage many moons ago. In this selection of Verdi baritone arias, he sounds like the same Domingo so many millions of people have known and loved, just taken down a few scale degrees. That's both a good thing and a bad thing. You don't necessarily want a baritone to sound like a tenor, and in a few of these arias, which move the action along more than a tenor aria would, you feel that he's not really digging into the lyrics. But let's face it: who else among Domingo's tenor contemporaries could have pulled this off? The voice is not just recognizably Domingo but pleasingly Domingo, with the characteristic mixture of power and relaxed flexibility that has endeared him to listeners who have never heard any other opera singer, or any other opera singers than the Three Tenors. Domingo sounds terrific. He gets dry, competent support from the Orquesta de la Comunitat Valenciana and its associated chorus under Pablo Heras-Casado; the orchestra keeps the focus on Domingo's voice, right where it belongs. If this album were by anyone else, it would hardly work; from Domingo it is something to prize. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES37,99 Fr.
CD27,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 20. Oktober 2014 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES21,99 Fr.
CD15,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 12. Januar 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet Auszeichnungen 5 de Diapason - 4F de Télérama
Due to his charismatic personality and special rapport with orchestras, Gustavo Dudamel has become one of the leading conductors of his generation, and his dramatically physical performances of exciting repertoire have made him a celebrity. His acclaimed renditions of the symphonies of Gustav Mahler have won devoted fans, particularly since he conducted the entire cycle with the Los Angeles Symphony and the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela in a series of historic concerts in 2012. Because of his success, he has been recording the symphonies on Deutsche Grammophon, giving his musicians the opportunity to become one of the best-known Mahler orchestras in the Americas. However, the Symphony No. 7 in E minor, "The Song of the Night," is not one of the most popular of Mahler's symphonies, and for many conductors, it is the most difficult to interpret. It is certainly the weirdest of the cycle, with four of its movements depicting scenes of nocturnal gloom, mystery, grotesquerie, and romance, only to be followed by a manic rondo-finale that bursts with daylight. The temptation to treat these movements as separate tone poems is strong, and many conductors have neglected the work's formal needs to emphasize its unofficial program. Dudamel succeeds in conveying the symphony's bizarre qualities, yet at the same time he maintains its propulsion and energy to hold the work together formally, and the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra plays with so much vitality and color that interest nevers flags. This is certainly one of the most compelling Mahler recordings Dudamel has made, and it's inspiring to hear what he has achieved with the oddest of Mahler's symphonies. Highly recommended. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES21,99 Fr.25,49 Fr.(14%)
CD15,49 Fr.17,99 Fr.(14%)

Klassik - Erschienen am 16. März 2014 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 12. Januar 2015 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
This is the final installment in a Beethoven sonata cycle (now also available as a box set) begun by Maurizio Pollini in the 1970s. As such, listeners might think it would differ from cycles recorded as a single creative statement, but in fact Pollini's output over his long career has been remarkably stable, especially in regard to Beethoven. The group, Nos. 16-20, released in 2014, contains some of the least-recorded items among Beethoven's sonatas, namely the highly transitional Piano Sonata No. 16 in G major, Op. 31/1, and the two student pieces, the Piano Sonata No. 19 in G minor, Op. 49/1, and Piano Sonata No. 20 in G major, Op. 49/2. Pollini in no way tosses off these minor pieces; his readings have all the virtues and, some would say, flaws of his recordings of the bigger sonatas. He can seem emotionless, but nobody can make a movement of Beethoven sound like a single large gesture, with each note precisely controlled and smoothly inserted into the whole, like Pollini can. His Beethoven is commanding without being especially dramatic, and that's quite a trick. His approach seems a bit overdone in the two Op. 49 sonatas, which work best when they're done in a simple, limpid way. But the Op. 31 group is coherent and controlled, with little outbursts of temper bursting through, and a bit of warmth allowed into the pastoral Op. 31/3. Those who have admired Pollini's Beethoven in the past will be very satisfied with this capstone to his Beethoven efforts. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES30,99 Fr.
CD21,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 26. August 2013 | Sony Classical

Hi-Res
Before automatically dismissing the idea of the 72-year-old tenor Plácido Domingo reincarnated as a baritone, consider that he started out as one on the zarzuela stage many moons ago. In this selection of Verdi baritone arias, he sounds like the same Domingo so many millions of people have known and loved, just taken down a few scale degrees. That's both a good thing and a bad thing. You don't necessarily want a baritone to sound like a tenor, and in a few of these arias, which move the action along more than a tenor aria would, you feel that he's not really digging into the lyrics. But let's face it: who else among Domingo's tenor contemporaries could have pulled this off? The voice is not just recognizably Domingo but pleasingly Domingo, with the characteristic mixture of power and relaxed flexibility that has endeared him to listeners who have never heard any other opera singer, or any other opera singers than the Three Tenors. Domingo sounds terrific. He gets dry, competent support from the Orquesta de la Comunitat Valenciana and its associated chorus under Pablo Heras-Casado; the orchestra keeps the focus on Domingo's voice, right where it belongs. If this album were by anyone else, it would hardly work; from Domingo it is something to prize. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES37,99 Fr.
CD27,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 3. März 2015 | De Montfort Music-Easter

Hi-Res Booklet
The Benedictines of Mary, Queen of Apostles, are a small choir (18 voices) of nuns from a monastery in the Kansas City, Missouri, area. Probably every female convent choir has issued a recording of some kind or another, and it is a little hard to account for the runaway success of this group. Easter at Ephesus is one in a series of albums tied to parts of the liturgical year, and, backed by the marketing muscle of the large Universal Music Group, the Benedictines have notched strong sales. They are young singers and offer a consistent sound that will appeal to those using the album primarily for contemplative purposes. But the mix of pieces, ranging from chant and medieval polyphony to pieces by Catholic scholars to semi-popular hymns like Jesus Christ Is Ris'n Today (track 9), is varied enough to keep listeners guessing but homogeneous enough to deliver reassurance and calm. Listeners using it for purposes of religious celebration are going to be delighted with the album, as are those who've enjoyed previous Benedictines of Mary releases. The sound is not an example of virtuoso engineering, but the choir seems comfortable in its own Priory, and the environment ultimately works toward the project's success. © James Manheim /TiVo
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HI-RES37,99 Fr.
CD27,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 7. August 2015 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet
This 2015 version of Puccini's Turandot has been cannily marketed and has sold well. The marketers had ideal material to work with. Those coming to the opera from the crossover pop recordings of tenor Andrea Bocelli probably needed little more motivation to purchase the album than his name on the cover: he can turn out a crowd even in places where opera is very rare, such as Indonesia. Opera aficionados, by contrast, may be attracted by the presence of conductor Zubin Mehta, who led the legendary 1972 recording of Turandot with Luciano Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland, and here returns to the work in old age. And serious devotees of the operatic scene will be drawn by a lead singer who's under-represented on recordings: the American soprano Jennifer Wilson in the title role. As it happens, all three legs of this triad hold up reasonably well. Wilson, a Wagnerian soprano, is indubitably a stronger voice than Bocelli, but it is to the tenor's credit that he is not overwhelmed; taking on opera in middle age, he has wisely not tried to force his voice into areas where it won't naturally go, and he exudes real enthusiasm in the role of Calaf, the Persian prince and romantic lead. Mehta brings energy throughout to this live performance with the Orquestra de la Comunitat Valencia, or perhaps one should say performances: the booklet, although it finds space to credit Bocelli's clothier, gives no performance details. It may be that several evenings of music were spliced together to present Bocelli in the best light, but if so, the joints are not obvious. Anyhow, nothing gets in the way of the rest of the cast: Wilson is a powerful Turandot, and there are strong characterizations in the smaller roles of Ping, Pang, and Pong, and all the rest. Recommended; sample Bocelli's "Nessun dorma" if you want an idea of his sound here. © TiVo
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HI-RES34,49 Fr.
CD24,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 10. Juli 2015 | De Montfort Music-Monks

Hi-Res Booklet
The potential buyer of an album of Gregorian chant has many choices, some of which have even reached top chart levels. But this one by the Monks of Norcia, a Benedictine group (said to make great beer) whose monastery is located near the original home of St. Benedict in Nurcia, Italy, stands out in several ways. First there is the program: chant recordings tend to bifurcate into new agey relaxation exercises on one hand and involved scholarly exercises on the other. Monks of Norcia bring a group of chants on a single subject, Mary, with the different types specified (mostly antiphons and responsories): this gives the music content and focus without bogging down in detail. Second, the monks themselves are very fine singers; this is plainly an institution with a long musical history. Third, Universal does an exceptional job with the sound, recorded at the monastery itself and communicating the feeling that the singing is made to fit the place. And finally there is something common enough in places where chant is a living tradition in use, but exceedingly rare on recordings: the monks perform not only chants from the "classic" Gregorian tradition, but more recent works including one original (Nos, qui Christi iugum, track 31). All these factors combine to produce a chant recording that can fulfill a meditative function but that adds an immediacy of content that takes the music out of the purely meditative realm. © James Manheim /TiVo