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Ab
HI-RES19,99 Fr.
CD14,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1957 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 16. April 1965 | Legacy International

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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 16. April 1965 | Everest Records

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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 16. April 1965 | Everest Records

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HI-RES16,49 Fr.
CD10,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1990 | HORTUS

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HI-RES15,79 Fr.
CD10,59 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 1997 | Music square

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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 4. November 2003 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2004 | Claves Records

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES17,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 15. Februar 2005 | Analekta

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HI-RES21,49 Fr.
CD18,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 9. Januar 2006 | Warner Classics

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES16,49 Fr.
CD10,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 30. April 2007 | HORTUS

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 11. März 2008 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

Hi-Res Booklet
Die Kunst der Fuge: what a way to make your Deutsche Grammophon solo recording debut. That's especially true if you're Pierre-Laurent Aimard, whose full-time gig is with Pierre Boulez's Ensemble InterContemporain and whose reputation was made in the avant-garde and not the late Baroque. This casting against type works in Aimard's favor. The intellectual cast of Bach's Art of the Fugue is perfect for a pianist who can play György Ligeti's etudes, and one would expect Aimard to deliver a reading of rare lucidity and crystalline virtuosity. But that he delves so deeply beneath the work's dense counterpoint to articulate the expressive art concealed by the music's technical brilliance is a pleasant surprise. Aimard's performances have not only the rigor of logic and rhetoric, they have the compulsion of drama. Recorded in translucent digital sound in the Mozart-Saal of Vienna's Konzerthaus, this recording deserves a wide audience, despite its apparent mismatch between performer and music. © TiVo
Ab
HI-RES25,49 Fr.
CD17,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Januar 2008 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Decca's Kaori Muraji Plays Bach doesn't make any pretensions toward representing the music of Johann Sebastian Bach in his historical element as has become commonplace. The orchestra used to accompany star guitarist Kaori Muraji in transcriptions of two Bach harpsichord concertos and the Air on a G String (to utilize this movement's popular title), the so-called Leipzig Bach Collegium, is a typical chamber orchestra made up of modern instruments, played in a modern way; sometimes the string basses even employ pizzicato effects, a device alien to Bach in his known orchestral scores. Likewise the part-writing in the orchestral accompaniments have been tweaked, particularly in the Air on a G String where figures in the solo part interact in a dialogue with similar gestures in the orchestra; a feature that will certainly cause Bach purists in the audience to say, "What the hell?" To get to first base with Kaori Muraji Plays Bach one will need to be able to accept the long-held notion that Bach can just about survive any treatment one can put him through or to simply not to care about the matter. Muraji, as is her wont, plays just as well here as she does on her other discs, and the solo pieces -- "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" (which sounds a little like it is overdubbed) the D minor Violin Partita and, as a bonus track, the Minuets BWV Anh. 114-115 once attributed to Bach and now known as the work of Christian Pezold are the highlights of the disc. In the orchestrally accompanied tracks Muraji is often a little buried in the mix and the tone of the string group is a little heavy, sounding a little like the "Baroque orchestras" common to recordings made in the 1950s and '60s. It's not too much of a distraction, though, and the reading of the oft-transcribed "Siciliano" in the E major harpsichord concerto is genuinely lovely. The bottom line with Decca's Kaori Muraji Plays Bach is that the attraction is mainly Kaori Muraji herself and not so much Bach, whose music has been transformed here to suit her talents. For her part, Muraji delivers, though this release is not as enthralling as her earlier Transformation album and could have used a mix that favors her sound more directly, especially given the way the Bach material is handled. Converts to Muraji should regard it as a successful entry into her canon; those heavy into Bach on his own terms, however, will most likely find Decca's Kaori Muraji Plays Bach considerably less enjoyable. © TiVo
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HI-RES15,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. April 2008 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES15,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 19. August 2008 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES2,32 Fr.
CD1,74 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 5. Februar 2009 | iM Antonio Rotunda

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HI-RES15,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 1. Juli 2009 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES37,99 Fr.
CD27,49 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 8. März 2010 | ECM New Series

Hi-Res Booklet
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HI-RES15,99 Fr.
CD12,99 Fr.

Klassik - Erschienen am 17. November 2009 | BIS

Hi-Res Booklet